Historic French building stuffed with plastic bags looks ready to explode

November 15, 2017 by  
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A shockingly large number of plastic bags appeared to fill a historic stone building to near bursting in Bordeaux last month. The eye-catching installation is the most recent work of Luzinterruptus , a design collective famous for raising environmental awareness with plastic art installations. Created for the FAB Festival de Bourdeaux, the temporary artwork, titled The Plastic We Live With, turned into a light installation at night evocative of illuminated stained glass. Inspired by France’s ban of single-use plastic bags passed last year, The Plastic We Live With draws attention to the staggering amount of plastic waste in the world. “The idea was to graphically visualize, in a way that could be understood by all, the plastic excess that is around us, a recurrent subject in our work and in life, since practically everything we consume is either made with this material or it is wrapped in it or we are eating it in small particles in the meat and the fish we ingest,” Luzinterruptus wrote. Related: PlasticWaste Labyrinth is a stunning look inside our plastic waste problem The team, aided by 30 volunteers from the Asociacion Bénévoles en Action, collected thousands of plastic bags and recycled plastic for months from the city stores and warehouses. The bags were assembled in the openings of the building’s facade and lit from behind at night. The installation was on view for four days, after which the plastic was taken down and recycled with the building returned to its original condition. + Luzinterruptus Images via Lola Martínez

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Historic French building stuffed with plastic bags looks ready to explode

Adorable owl cabins let you camp inside for free and off the grid in France

July 7, 2017 by  
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A giant trio of adorable timber owls has popped up in rural France—and you can sleep inside them for free! Perfect for summer camping in Bourdeaux, these beautiful cabins are the work of Bruit du Frigo partner Zebra3/Buy-Sellf and built as part of the Refuges Périurbains (Peri-urban shelters) in the Bordeaux region. Named “Les Guetteurs” (The Watchers), this sixth unique cabin of the series is located off the grid along the edge of the city and is designed to encourage urban hiking and exploration of lesser-known sites. Zebra3/Buy-Sellf designed and built “Les Guetteurs” in the likeness of Bourdeaux’s ground-dwelling owls that live in open landscapes. The three enchanting owls are huddled together as a single mass, creating a large cabin with three floors. The building features a circular plywood frame clad in strips of curved wood. Shingles cut to look like feathers top the roof, while giant circular windows are installed for the owl’s “eyes.” The shelter is built atop a boardwalk elevated over a wetlands area. Related: MVRDV to upgrade historic French city with modern, ecological design A forest-inspired glazed door opens up to a light-filled interior with faceted timber walls. Operating off-grid without running water or electricity, the cabin is fairly bare bones yet its timber palette creates a cozy environment. Circular white beds built to look like nests are located on the different levels connected via ladders. Like all of the shelters in the Refuges Périurbains project, “Les Guetteurs” can host up to nine people and helps encourage locals and visitors to reconnect with Bourdeaux’s landscape and environment. Bookings for the free lodging can be made on the Refuges Périurbains website. + Zebra3/Buy-Sellf Via Tiny House Blog

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Adorable owl cabins let you camp inside for free and off the grid in France

Minimalist wine-tasting pavilions sustainably embrace Napa Valley

July 7, 2017 by  
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There are few places better to enjoy fantastic wines and views than Napa Valley , and Walker Warner Architects has elevated that experience with a series of elegant wine tasting pavilions. Crafted with environmental sustainability in mind, the pavilions were built for Quintessa Estate Winery, a Napa Valley estate also designed by Walker Warner Architects in 2003. The minimalist structures harmonize with nature with locally sourced and reclaimed materials, as well as prefabricated construction to minimize site impact. Winner of a recent American Institute of Architects San Francisco (AIA SF) Citation Award , the Quintessa Pavilions is commended for exemplifying “the ideal fusion of architecture and nature” on the ridgeline of a beautiful 280-acre winery estate. Carefully placed amongst existing oak trees and surrounded by drought-resistant native grasses , each 250-square-foot pavilion was crafted to provide an immersive, privately hosted wine-tasting experience. The pavilions’ industrial materials palette references the winery’s architecture and will age elegantly over time. Related: The Bardessono is Napa Valley’s Newest Eco Resort and Spa The architects carefully sited each pavilion to shade visitors beneath tree canopies, optimize views, and protect existing mature oaks. Visitors access the pavilion through a doorway carved into a concrete wall, built of fly ash, that runs along the ridgeline. Once inside the prefabricated steel structure, the visitors enjoy plenty of natural light, cross winds, and panoramic views through full-height glazed operable doors. Custom furnishings are built of FSC-certified Afromosia. Reclaimed Sinker cypress was used for casework and ceilings, while locally prefabricated concrete pavers cover the terrace surface and Napa syar stone retaining walls hold back earth. + Walker Warner Architects Photo credit: © Matthew Millman

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Minimalist wine-tasting pavilions sustainably embrace Napa Valley

Free off-grid shelter pops up for urban explorers in Bordeaux

July 5, 2017 by  
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Exploring the fringes of France’s famed wine-growing region is now easier and better than ever. After a long day’s hike—and enjoyment of some Bordeaux wine and cheese—urban explorers can take refuge in Le Haut Perché, an elevated shelter designed by London-based Studio Weave . Crafted as part of the Refuges Périurbains project, this unique shelter is one of eleven free overnight shelters on the edge of the city that encourage the exploration of Bordeaux’s fringe sites. Refuges Périurbains founder Bruit du Frigo and Zebra 3 commissioned Studio Weave to develop the Le Haut Perché hiking shelter, which sits along a pedestrian route connected by a series of site-specific overnight shelters. “The fringes of Bordeaux remain relatively unknown,” Studio Weave wrote. “As is common to this periphery in most cities, these areas are often overlooked, experienced from afar by car rather than as destinations in their own right. Bridging city and wilderness, peripheral urban sites also offer their own magic and potential.” The Refuges Périurbains shelters encourage exploration by providing free accommodation that sleeps up to nine people. Studio Weave’s contribution to the project is an organic shelter in the peaceful heart of Le Parc des Jalles and surrounded by watermills Le Moulin du Moulina. Elevated next to one of Bordeaux’s main water sources, Le Haut Perché takes inspiration from traditional water towers with its material palette and form. The raised shelter is built of timber and weathering steel to blend into the rural landscape. Related: Tiny off-grid Le Tronc Creux shelters blend into Bordeaux’s forests like old tree trunks “The arching platform captures focused sounds and vistas of water and woodland,” said the studio. “Each opening is composed to frame a particular moment, some to be experienced lying down, others stood or sat-up.” The arched roof extends over the sides of the shelter for solar shading . The Le Haut Perché can be booked in advance on the Refuges Périurbains website . + Studio Weave Images by Bruit du frigo

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Free off-grid shelter pops up for urban explorers in Bordeaux

Greenery-covered ziggurat symbolizes Burkina Fasos new era of democracy

July 5, 2017 by  
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African architect Francis Kéré is making headlines for this year’s Serpentine Pavilion , but London’s not the only place where he’s making a splash. The Berlin-based architect was commissioned to redesign his home country’s National Assembly, the Burkina Faso parliament building that had been set ablaze during the country’s revolution in 2014. Covered in green terraces, the striking ziggurat structure draws on traditional African principles and will be complemented with a memorial park. After 31 years of dictatorial rule, the people of Burkina Faso revolted against their government in a series of demonstrations and riots known as the 2014 Burkinabé uprising. In protest of the old regime, the former National Assembly was set ablaze and destroyed. As part of the country’s new start into democracy, architect Kéré was commissioned to design a new parliament building that would not only symbolize the country’s ideals for transparency, openness, and equality, but also catalyze development for Ouagadougou. The proposed National Assembly is a giant ziggurat structure that rises to a height of six stories. “The stepped pyramidal structure becomes a monument that citizens can climb and have an elevated view of Ouagadougou,” wrote the Kéré Architecture. “In an area where the highest altitude does not exceed more than 400 meters, this unexpected but accessible height in the middle of the flat urban fabric offers a new perspective both literally and metaphorically.” A tree occupies the heart of the building in reference to “arbre à palabres” (tree of discussion) under which Burkinabé leaders make decisions in the countryside. Related: Diébédo Francis Kéré unveils 2017 Serpentine Pavilion with rain-gathering roof The 25,000-square-meter 127-seat public assembly also pays homage to subsistence farming since 90% of the country’s labor force is dedicated to agriculture. The pyramidal building’s facade provides solar shading and also includes publicly accessible green terraces that serve as educational tools to pioneer new urban farming methods. Strategically placed openings allows for crosswinds and natural cooling. The ruins of the old assembly are transformed into a shaded depression for the collection of rainwater that will be reused for on-site irrigation. A Memorial Park with a reflection pool and landscaping complements the building and offer a space for reflection on those who lost their lives in the revolts. + Kéré Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Kéré Architecture

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Greenery-covered ziggurat symbolizes Burkina Fasos new era of democracy

MVRDV to upgrade historic French city with modern, ecological design

June 15, 2017 by  
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France’s historic Bordeaux World Heritage Site is getting a modern ecological refresh thanks to prolific Rotterdam-based firm MVRDV . Working together with local architecture studio Flint , the architects unveiled Ilot Queyries, a pilot project for a new neighborhood that combines the European city’s historic qualities with eco-friendly and contemporary features. The dense and mixed-use masterplan not only calls for modern architecture and green space, but will also include solar panels, an integrated water system, and optimization of natural lighting in all buildings. Located east of the River Garonne, the 2.5-hectare Ilot Queyries neighborhood occupies a coveted riverside site with views towards the water and the historic city. The mixed-use masterplan comprises over 300 apartments, commercial units, a glass-fronted rooftop restaurant, and a large public park located at the heart of the development with a garden of alder, birch, and high grasses. To optimize views, natural ventilation , and access to daylight , the architects designed the building facades with 45-degree angles. These angular buildings give the development a modern sculptural aesthetic. A large landmark building at the riverfront will feature a unique angled facade covered with varying gold shades of ceramic tiles for a beautifully textured effect. Related: MVRDV transforms an abandoned highway into a “plant village” in the sky “For the Bastide Niel master plan we make an update of the European city: based on the values of the historic city that is intimate, dense and mixed, whilst at the same time proposing new objectives like sunlight for all, even on the ground floor, new energy supplies with solar panels , integrated water system and more green spaces,” said MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas. “The concept of the cuts of the volumes is introduced here at Ilot Queyries which can be interpreted as a pilot project of the master plan Bastide Niel. Cuts in the volume allow the new qualities and allow adapting to the neighbours and mimic the height of nearby buildings. The result is ‘a true Grande Dame’ which stretches from very low pavilion-like housing towards the neighbourhoods at the back and more ambitious and monumental where the scale permits to do so, for example at the Garonne riverside facing the historic left bank.” Ilot Queyries is located next to and is a part of the larger ZAC Bastide-Niel masterplan, also designed by MVRDV, that aims to create an inviting, attractive, and greener extension to Bourdeaux’s city center. Ilot Queyries will be completed in mid-2019. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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New City of Wine museum in Bordeaux looks like wine swirling in a glass

July 21, 2016 by  
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The shape of La Cité du Vin references wine in a variety of ways; it could be interpreted to mimic gnarled vine stock or wine swirling in a glass. Its round volumes are clad in silk-screen printed glass panels and perforated, lacquered aluminum panels that change appearance depending on the time of day. Related: Italy’s Green-Roofed Antinori Winery is Topped With a Vineyard! Two entrances on opposite sides of the building facilitate and accentuate movement and flow, leading visitors to the highest point of the structure-an observation tower offering expansive views of the city. The ground floor features numerous mirrored surfaces that encourage visitors to move up towards the light, just like a vine plant grows upwards towards the sun. Wooden structural elements visible in the interior are reminiscient of boats, wine, and its travels. + XTU Architects Via World Architecture News Photos by XTU Architects

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New City of Wine museum in Bordeaux looks like wine swirling in a glass

ANMA transformed marine hangars into a naturally-ventilated housing block in Bordeaux

July 17, 2015 by  
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Stunning animated Vortex sculpture uses LEDs to show its site’s energy consumption

December 5, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Stunning animated Vortex sculpture uses LEDs to show its site’s energy consumption Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1024 Architecture , bordeaux , Darwin Project , footbridge , france , Green Building , green renovation , interactive art , interactive installation , LED lights , realtime data , Vortex , vortex sculpture , wooden sculpture

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Stunning animated Vortex sculpture uses LEDs to show its site’s energy consumption

Sublime Wine Storage Unit Lights up the Night with Low Energy LEDs in France

November 17, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Sublime Wine Storage Unit Lights up the Night with Low Energy LEDs in France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Baggio-Piechaud , Ballande Group , bordeaux , creative wine storage , eco design , france , green design , LED facade , LED lights , moat , sublime wine facility , sustainable design , wine storage unit

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Sublime Wine Storage Unit Lights up the Night with Low Energy LEDs in France

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