Recycled wind turbine blades proposed as a playscape for Burning Man

April 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Recycled wind turbine blades proposed as a playscape for Burning Man

Washington-based architect and designer Michael Mannhard has unveiled designs for BladeYARD, a proposal for a Burning Man 2021 installation built from recycled wind turbine blades. Created as a visual warning of the effects of climate change and shortsighted solutions, the installation mimics a large-scale ruin with parts of the blades submerged in the sands of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. Part of Mannhard’s inspiration for the project stems from a recent Bloomberg News article that says wind turbine blades can’t be recycled, and as a result, they are piling up in landfills at a rate of nearly 8,000 blades a year. “What does it mean when this symbol of hope fails us so greatly?” asks Mannhard, who recalls growing up in the Midwest and marveling at sights of the massive turbines. “How is it that the most prominent symbol of our sustainable future was designed in such a way as to simply be buried in the ground at the end of its working life as a blade? These objects are now layered in new meaning as symbols of our shortsightedness in how we approach our built world and the incredible challenge of designing for the whole life cycle of products.” Related: Windwords proposal turns wind turbines into public art The BladeYARD project would explore those questions by bringing people up close with a “graveyard” of wind turbine blades. The massive blades — some of which can reach 100 meters in length — would be arranged like the bleached bones of an animal carcass, with some elements lying flat and partly buried in the sand while others stick straight up. Burning Man participants would be able to climb atop of, seek shelter under and wander through the sculptural installation. If it is accepted as an installation at Burning Man 2021, Mannhard plans to have BladeYARD dismantled and moved to a more permanent home after the event. Burning Man is scheduled to take place every year at the end of the summer in Northern Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. + Michael Mannhard Images by Michael Mannhard

The rest is here:
Recycled wind turbine blades proposed as a playscape for Burning Man

Marine veteran converts a school bus into a nonprofit traveling art studio

April 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Marine veteran converts a school bus into a nonprofit traveling art studio

It’s safe to say that Marine veteran Jessica Rambo is not one to rest on her laurels. After 10 years of service in the Marine Corps, the mom of two worked day in and day out for two years in order to convert a 1997 Blue Bird school bus into a full-time tiny house on wheels that also serves as a roaming art studio. Now, Rambo and her two kids are about to embark on a long road trip to bring her nonprofit art organization, The Painted Buffalo Studio , to veterans around the country. After serving in the Marines, Rambo enrolled in art school as a way to transition back to civilian life. As a single mother, she decided that she also needed to downsize to show her kids the importance of living a life without excess . Once she decided to renovate the old Blue Bird school bus, she also found a new purpose to her project — to serve her fellow veterans by offering art classes to those who need an outlet after coming home. Related: Old bus is converted into a mobile greenhouse to teach students about sustainable eating habits Doing most of the work herself on the weekends, Rambo took two years to completely renovate the bus. The result is a light-filled, cabin-like tiny home on wheels with dark wood throughout the space, enhanced with white and teal accents. The living space includes a surprisingly large kitchen with butcher-block counters and teal cabinets. Alongside the kitchen, a small dinette doubles as a workspace on one side, and a long, cushioned bench with storage underneath was installed along the other wall. The skoolie even has a small zen garden/shrine under the front windshield. For sleeping, the bus features two bunk beds for the kids as well as a master bedroom at the back of the tiny home for Rambo. One unique feature is the bathroom, which has just enough space for a cool metal soaking tub and a composting toilet . According to Jessica, the skoolie conversion was much more than just turning an old bus into a home. “I wanted to do something wild. I wanted to prove to myself that when I set my mind to something I complete it,” Rambo said. “I felt like I didn’t complete my mission in the Marine Corps, I was struggling to get through art school, and I wanted to show myself and my children that just because you fail at something that is important to you, you can dust yourself off and try again.” After the long DIY renovation , Rambo and her family moved into the converted bus in August 2019. They are currently mapping out a road trip around the country in order to bring art classes to veterans through her nonprofit organization, Painted Buffalo Traveling Studio . + Painted Buffalo Traveling Studio Via Tiny House Talk Images via Painted Buffalo Traveling Studio

See the original post here: 
Marine veteran converts a school bus into a nonprofit traveling art studio

Bad Behavior has blocked 4877 access attempts in the last 7 days.