How will Los Angeles’ 2028 Olympics impact the environment?

October 13, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Hosting the Olympics is a huge honor for cities. At the same time, it’s an expensive burden. As  Los Angeles  plans for its summer 2028 games, many people say the event will be neither as sustainable or equitable as city leaders have promised. Mayor Eric Garcetti has said the games — with an estimated $7 billion price tag — will have “no impact” on L.A., neither damaging the environment nor adding debt. Part of the way he plans to accomplish this is a no-build policy that would repurpose existing structures rather than creating new stadiums. This would prevent residential displacement, limit environmental impact and save money. Most  Olympic  host cities build like crazy. Related: Those Olympic anti-sex beds? They’re actually for recycling. However, local activists have noted sneaky ways of getting around the no-build pledge. Over the last five years, three new sports facilities have been approved, two of which have already been completed. Worth $8.5 billion, these facilities will be used during the Olympics. The workaround? Most of the  construction  took place in Inglewood, not Los Angeles itself. And the stadiums are privately owned. Inglewood activists are drawing attention to  environmental racism . The majority Black and brown community is already stuck between the world’s fourth busiest airport and L.A. County’s second-biggest oil field, plus a couple of extremely busy freeways. Add in the construction noise, increased traffic and accompanying air pollution of creating major sports facilities, and Inglewood residents have had about enough. “There is a deliberate effort to unravel and dismantle our community for economic profits because they don’t see the land and the people living here as worth anything,” said Alexis Aceves, a member of the Lennox-Inglewood Tenants Union (LITU), as reported by Grist. “They’re trying to act like they just lucked upon already active construction, but there was no way this wasn’t planned.” The LITU has been warning Los Angeles that the 2028 Olympic games will further deteriorate the built and natural environment of Inglewood. Via Grist Lead image via Pexels

More here:
How will Los Angeles’ 2028 Olympics impact the environment?

TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

October 13, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Joanne Lee Molinaro is a trial lawyer, marathon runner and TikTok sensation as @thekoreanvegan. The Chicagoan took time out of her busy schedule to talk about her debut cookbook/memoir “The Korean Vegan” released on Tuesday, Oct. 12. Here’s what she had to say about being one of the best-known Korean vegans. Buy “The Korean Vegan” on Amazon Inhabitat: How did you decide to adopt a plant-based diet? Molinaro: I decided to adopt a plant-based diet at the suggestion of my then boyfriend (now husband). At his urging, I watched a lot of movies and read a lot of books about the impact animal agriculture had on health and climate change and grew more open to the idea of going plant-based. I also worried that if I didn’t join him in this change in diet that it would inject a complication into a fairly nascent relationship.  Accordingly, I decided to give it a try on a probationary basis.  Ultimately, it ended up being far easier than I expected. Also during that time, my father grew ill with prostate cancer , and given what I’d read in my research regarding the link between the consumption of red meat and cancer, I felt it best that I discontinue eating meat permanently. Related: Cooking inspiration from vegan recipes all over the world Inhabitat: How did your Korean-American family and friends respond to that decision? Molinaro: Many of them were skeptical or simply confused by the decision.  Some of them said, “But how can you be vegan? You’re Korean!” Lots of people — including Korean Americans — believe that Korean food is very meat-centric (think Korean BBQ) and, therefore, Korean people can’t be vegan. My family simply assumed that I was just trying to lose weight (and, to be honest, the thought did cross my mind at the time, even though weight loss no longer has anything to do with why I’m vegan). Now, though, I believe both my family and friends have seen just how much closer to my heritage going vegan has brought me and that it’s far more than a diet to me. Inhabitat:  Which traditional Korean dishes lend themselves especially well to a vegan interpretation? Molinaro: There’s a whole segment of Korean cuisine that is already largely plant based — Buddhist Temple Cuisine. Prepared by Korean Buddhist nuns, the food is consistent with the philosophy of “do as little harm as possible.” As such, the nuns avoid using animal products when cooking (e.g. they do not use fish sauce when fermenting kimchi).  While the ingredients are often thought of as “humble” because they do not incorporate meat (which still symbolizes wealth in Korea), in fact, many of these dishes come straight out of the kitchens of Korean courtesans — women who served in the Korean palaces often remained unmarried for their tenure and retired to Buddhist temples, where they then shared their knowledge of palace cuisine. It’s no wonder that entirely plant-based restaurants in Korea are now Michelin rated eateries — the food is stunning, flavorful and totally vegan. Otherwise, many of the banchan (or side dishes) lend themselves well to being “veganized.” Most banchan highlight pickled or seasoned vegetables and, often times, all you have to do is remove the fish sauce to render them completely plant based. A good example of this is kimchi.  Inhabitat: Any Korean dishes that were really hard to veganize?  Molinaro: The hardest thing I’ve had to veganize thus far is a good broth. Many Korean stews start out with a very rich pork or beef broth. Developing a vegetable broth that could provide the same kind of complexity and depth was challenging, but my upcoming cookbook includes a vegetable broth that is excellent. I’m quite proud of it! Inhabitat: What do you think is special about Korean food? Molinaro: I think banchan is what makes Korean food so unique. There are usually anywhere from 10 to 20 of these small dishes on a Korean dining table at dinner . Sometimes referred to as “garnishes,” the role of banchan is truly to maximize each mouthful of food (i.e. the perfect bite). Korean food teaches the palate to appreciate a combination of flavors and textures, how they interplay and enhance each other.  For example, instead of simply focusing on your protein , moving to your carbs and then nibbling on your salad. Each spoonful is an opportunity to craft a mouthwatering mosaic of complementary tastes that might include a little rice, some protein, a sliver of some pickled vegetable, all followed by a piping hot spoonful of soybean stew — salty, tart, soft, crunchy, hot and cold all come together to form a unique blend of deliciousness. Inhabitat: Tell us a little bit about your new cookbook. Molinaro: My new cookbook is designed to live up to the aphorism: “Love my food? Love my people.” I want people to see how varied Korean cuisine is — it’s not just Korean BBQ.  I also want them to see how easy it is to infuse flavors from your childhood into new plant-based favorites so that you can always retain that connection to your heritage and culture. Finally, I want people to fall in love with my family — the people behind my food. Inhabitat: What are the pros and cons to being a famous vegan on social media? Molinaro: I totally don’t think I’m famous! Believe me — my husband and dog, Rudy, would disabuse me of such a notion pretty quickly! That said, having a large social media following as a vegan, does give me access to an incredible community of plant-based individuals who share so many of the same values as I do — whether it’s a love of animals , a sense of stewardship over the planet or mindful eating in general. I am so grateful to the plant-based community for their vocal and sometimes protective support of my work. Unfortunately, on the flip side of that coin is that my large following subjects me to the trolls — those who think veganism is “unnatural.” Luckily, I don’t get much of that though! Inhabitat: What else would you like readers to know about you?  Molinaro: I used to be addicted to video games and can still go toe-to-toe with the best in Mario Kart! Inhabitat: Would you share a recipe with us? Molinaro: Sure! One of my favorite recipes in the book is the Pecan Paht Pie. It’s perfect for the upcoming holidays and it’s requested by my totally non-vegan family every year! PECAN PAHT ( ????? • Sweet Red Bean) PIE Serves 8-10 Difficulty: Medium Allergens: GFO One Thanksgiving I decided I wanted to make pecan pie that my family would actually eat. We’re not fans of overly sweet desserts, but my father absolutely loves pecans. The answer to creating a less cloyingly sweet filling was simple — paht! Not only is the red bean paste far less sugar-y than the typical custard-like filling of a traditional pecan pie, I knew my family would instantly appreciate the familiar flavor. I presented my little pie that Thanksgiving, and since then I have been asked to make it every year. For the pie crust: 1½ cups (210 grams) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt ? cup (152 grams) cold vegan butter, cut into ½-inch cubes 3 to 4 tablespoons ice water For the pie filling and topping : ¾ cup (300 grams) brown rice syrup 6 tablespoons soy or oat milk 1 cup (320 grams) paht ¼ cup (50 grams) light brown sugar 4 tablespoons (57 grams) vegan butter, melted and cooled ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups (220 gram) chopped pecans 3½ tablespoons (35 gram) potato starch 1 cup (110 gram) pecan halves Steps: 1. Make the pie crust: In a food processor, combine the flour, sugar and salt and pulse while adding the butter, a few pieces at a time. Add the ice water, one tablespoon at a time, until a dough starts to form. 2. Shape the dough into a ball. Do not handle more than necessary. Wrap with plastic and refrigerate for at least four hours, but best if overnight. 3. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 4. Make the pie filling and topping: In a medium bowl, combine the brown rice syrup, soy milk, paht, brown sugar, melted butter, salt , vanilla, chopped pecans and potato starch. 5. Place the pie dough between two sheets of parchment paper. Using a rolling pin, roll out the pie dough gently until it is large enough to line a nine-inch pie pan. Ease the crust into the pan and trim any excess dough at the edges with kitchen shears or a sharp paring knife. Pour in the filling. Top the filling with pecan halves. 6. Transfer the pie to the oven and bake until the pie filling sets (i.e. doesn’t jiggle too much), one hour to one hour 15 minutes. Cool the pie on a wire rack for two hours before serving. Via “The Korean Vegan Cookbook” Images via The Korean Vegan When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commissions at no cost to you.

Read the original post: 
TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

Former BlackRock executive believes we are sleepwalking into a climate disaster

September 20, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Former BlackRock executive believes we are sleepwalking into a climate disaster

Tariq Fancy, BlackRock’s former chief investment officer for sustainable investing, thinks its governments, not businesses, that must take the lead on climate change.

Go here to see the original:
Former BlackRock executive believes we are sleepwalking into a climate disaster

A modern desert retreat for the eco-conscious cowboy

August 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A modern desert retreat for the eco-conscious cowboy

It’s the kind of thing movies are made of, but Hollywood isn’t the only one to get inspiration from this region of the vast and open Mojave Desert . Dubbed the Cowboy Modern Desert Eco-Retreat, this home pairs old west inspiration with modern eco-friendly features. Jeremy Levine Design was in charge of the project, a 1,200-square-foot family vacation home on a plot of protected desert between Joshua Tree National Park and Pioneertown, CA. The home includes two bedrooms, two baths, a great room with a kitchen, living and dining space, porches on three sides and a well-developed outdoor space where decks expand the living area and a path leads to a hot spa and cold cowboy tub. Related: Self-sufficient Sail House by David Hertz Architects looks like a ship The property came with limited access and no infrastructure, so Levine drew on his experience in  green design  to connect the indoor living space with expansive views and sustainable features. The Cowboy Modern Desert Eco-Retreat relies exclusively on locally reclaimed lumber for the interior and exterior wood surfaces. Steel, prefabricated offsite, was used to frame the home. Levine chose these materials in response to the area’s harsh weather conditions and a desire for quick, low-impact construction.  Copious large windows frame the Black Hills and Sawtooth Mountains in the distance while allowing in  natural light . Concrete floors and an open floor plan aid in keeping the home cool. The structure is situated to capture breezes as they are channeled through the canyon, and porch overhangs provide temperature control through shading. The orientation also minimizes solar heat gain.  During construction, the team took special care to avoid unnecessary grading for minimal site impact with respect to the fact that the project sits in a zone with Resource Conservation Protection. This not only minimized soil and plant disruption but required an inspection from a biologist to ensure no desert  tortoises or owls  would be affected by construction. All Joshua Trees were also preserved.  To further minimize the environmental footprint, the home uses a zero-waste system. All water from sinks, showers and washing is recycled and used for irrigation.  Solar panels  are scheduled to be installed soon. The interior design includes western-inspired leather, a fire table made from leftover construction materials and a vanity made from reclaimed lumber .  + Jeremy Levine Design Images via Lance Gerber and Tali Mackay

See original here:
A modern desert retreat for the eco-conscious cowboy

This house by the lake erases the barrier between inside and outside

August 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This house by the lake erases the barrier between inside and outside

Designed to harmonize with the surrounding landscape , this home merges outdoor spaces with indoor living for a multi-generational family in a home known by architecture practice Atelier Starzak Strebicki as “Single family house by the lake.” Located in Poland , this home has a common space in the connected kitchen and dining room for gatherings of any size. Massive windows provide panoramic views of the outdoors, erasing the division between the spaces. The home also provides four bedrooms, one with a moving wall for ever-changing needs as the family grows. It includes three bathrooms, a utility room, media room, garage and more. Related: The Cantilever House combats a hot climate with sustainable design The design throughout the space keeps the eye pulling forwards. Steel columns support a unique concrete roof, and the walls are constructed from  brick . The ceiling seems to reflect the flooring for a cohesive feel throughout the space. From nearly every room, residents can access terraces, including those on the roof with a view of the lake and garden. Terraces accessible from the bedrooms are covered for shade.  In addition to connecting everyday life to nature, the design team focused on  energy efficiency  with a water-to-water heat pump that relies on underground heat, pulling from two boreholes extending up to 150 meters beneath the surface. The concrete roof and thick, well-insulated walls ensure comfortable temperature control throughout the space. The architectural team at Atelier Starzak Strebicki also included a  passive design  with carefully placed windows for natural light and heat reduction. The notable skylights were placed on the north side to avoid intense heat while still allowing natural light. All of the many windows are triple-glazed for maximum efficiency in all types of weather.  When the temperature drops, a fireplace in the living room warms the space. This couples with the coziness of the space’s  natural materials  such as walnut veneer, stone and old planks from the demolished platform that were used to finish the interior.  + Atelier Starzak Strebicki  Images via Danil Daneliuk

Read more here: 
This house by the lake erases the barrier between inside and outside

What does it Mean to be Net-Zero in the Financial Sector?

August 9, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on What does it Mean to be Net-Zero in the Financial Sector?

Investors, lenders and climate policy experts discuss how the financial sector can achieve net-zero lending and investment portfolios. Speakers: Brian O’Hanlon | Executive Director, Center for Climate-Aligned Finance | RMI Danielle Sugarman | Director, Investment Stewardship | BlackRock Deborah Ng | Head of Responsible Investing and Director, Total Fund Management | Ontario Teachers’? Pension Plan Jacqueline Smith | Vice President, Sustainability | JPMorgan Chase This session was held at GreenBiz Group’s VERGE Net Zero, July 27-28, 2021. Learn more about the event here: https://events.greenbiz.com/events/verge-net-zero/online/2021

Go here to see the original:
What does it Mean to be Net-Zero in the Financial Sector?

Investors, companies demand consistent climate risk data

June 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Investors, companies demand consistent climate risk data

Two of the world’s largest asset management firms, State Street Advisors and BlackRock, publicly support improved disclosure.

More:
Investors, companies demand consistent climate risk data

How climate laws can catalyze more equitable cities

June 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How climate laws can catalyze more equitable cities

Environmental justice advocates are working to ensure California’s efforts to combat climate change benefit everyone — and then applied nationwide.

Original post:
How climate laws can catalyze more equitable cities

Lego, Tesco face risks with public renewables goals

June 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Lego, Tesco face risks with public renewables goals

Renewables are now firmly in the mainstream, but corporates must overcome the barriers to deliver the scale that is needed.

The rest is here:
Lego, Tesco face risks with public renewables goals

Spherical timber teahouse hides in the treetops of Austria

May 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Spherical timber teahouse hides in the treetops of Austria

Teatime is served with a side of enviable treetop views at the pod-shaped Teahouse Riedenthaln nestled in an Austrian garden. Architecture firm a-lp architektur designed the curious igloo-shaped timber hideaway as a modern interpretation of the traditional Japanese teahouse . The 10-square-meter elevated space was largely built from recycled oak wood offcuts. Located in a private garden, the spherical room serves as a place to drink tea, for hosting regression therapy clients, and as a possible sleeping area. A ramp leads up to the low and narrow entrance that opens to a light-filled and surprisingly spacious interior. Natural light fills the cave-like space through a large painted skylight and two rectangular windows. Related: Cocoon Tree: A lightweight, spherical treehouse for sustainable living The tiny teahouse retreat is raised on four black-painted pillars, made of tree trunks. Locally chopped oak timber was used as the main material for the teahouse. The wood cladding was recycled from the small timber offcuts of a local wine barrel-maker and assembled in stacks of over forty layers. The furniture, which includes a counter with a sink, window seat, and sleeping area, is also made from oak timber. + a-lp architektur Via ArchDaily Images by Christine Leuthner

Read more from the original source:
Spherical timber teahouse hides in the treetops of Austria

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 14429 access attempts in the last 7 days.