‘I Am a Plastic Bag’ is made from recycled single-use plastic bottles

March 2, 2020 by  
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Following the sold-out success of “I Am Not a Plastic Bag” in 2007, designer brand Anya Hindmarch has launched a new product, called “I Am a Plastic Bag”, aimed at recycling single-use plastic and leaving behind a net-zero carbon footprint from production. The initial “I Am Not a Plastic Bag” release was a campaign to raise awareness about disposable plastic bag usage. According to a press release from the company, “The British Retail Consortium estimated that in 2006, the U.K. alone used 10.6bn plastic bags, and this figure dropped to 6.1bn in 2010. Specifically, Sainsbury’s cut the number of bags they gave away by 58% in the two years that followed the campaign, giving out 312m fewer bags in 2008 than 2009 and saving 13,200 tonnes of virgin plastic over two years.” Related: Patagonia’s Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles Thirteen years later, Hindmarch has decided to shift focus. Instead of centering the campaign around reducing plastic bag usage, the new “I Am a Plastic Bag” is made from a soft, cotton-like fabric constructed from recycled plastic bottles to spotlight the excessive waste generated from single-use plastic. The manufacturing process begins by washing and sorting the collected bottles before they are shredded and turned into pellets. The pellets are then converted into fibers that are spun and woven into fabric . To achieve the weather-resistant finish, the bags are coated in a recycled PVB made from old windshields. Anya Hindmarch partnered with a Taiwanese company for the finish, which appears to be the only one of its kind that has achieved Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certification. After considering faux options, the company decided the least impactful trim was real leather. It sourced the natural meat byproduct as a way to recycle the material. Collected from a tannery in Northern Italy, the leather doesn’t travel far to the manufacturing line. While Anya Hindmarch designers don’t believe that carbon-offsetting is the answer for an industry known for excessive waste and pollution , they also partnered with EcoAct, a global climate change consultant. EcoAct has been measuring the emissions from the I Am a Plastic Bag production in order to make the process carbon-neutral. As a statement of what the line stands for, Anya Hindmarch closed its doors for three days, completely filling the store with 90,000 discarded plastic water bottles and a post on the door explaining the cause. A limited selection of bags was pre-launched in February at London Fashion Week, and the complete four-color collection will be widely available in April. + Anya Hindmarch Images via Anya Hindmarch

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‘I Am a Plastic Bag’ is made from recycled single-use plastic bottles

Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

February 27, 2020 by  
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London-based architect Margot Krasojevic has just unveiled a futuristic art gallery that runs on hydroelectric power. Slated for the coastal Russian region of Sochi, the Hydroelectric Sculpture Gallery will harness enough wave energy to not only be 100% self-sufficient, but it will also be able to channel surplus energy back into the grid, powering around 200 nearby houses and businesses as a result. The art gallery will be located on Sochi’s coastline, where it will use the exceptionally strong coastal swells from the Black Sea to power a water turbine system . Krasojevic’s vision depicts a sculptural volume that rises out of an existing wooden promenade. The building, which will be partly submerged into the sea, will be strategically angled at 45 degrees to the coastline for maximum wave exposure. Related: Oil rig off South Korea’s coast to become a floating hotel that operates on tidal energy According to the design plans, the building will “use the environment’s characteristics to generate clean, sustainable energy, without affecting the quality and nature of the landscape.” State-of-the-art engineering will allow the structure to harvest wave energy through oscillating water columns as the waves crash against it. Generating up to 300kW, the system will enable the gallery to operate completely off the grid and channel surplus energy back into the grid. It could supply clean energy to approximately 200 households and businesses in the same area. Visitors to the futuristic gallery will enter through a long walkway stretching out from the shore. The robust exterior of the building will comprise various walkways and ramps that wind around the steel structure. Sinuous volumes will conceal the building’s many turbines, which will also be partially submerged underwater. Inside, the spaces will reflect the building’s functions. The various galleries will be laid out into a power plant format, with steel clad ceilings that mimic the rolling waves that crash into the exterior. Irregularly shaped skylights will also create a vibrant, kaleidoscope show of shadow and light throughout the day. + Margot Krasojevic Images via Margot Krasojevic

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Hydroelectric art gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self-sustaining

After Cyber Monday, here comes a new spotlight on e-commerce shipping

December 4, 2019 by  
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This article is adapted from GreenBiz’s newsletter, Transport Weekly, running Tuesdays. Subscribe here.How many Amazon packages were rapidly shipped to your home this week thanks to Black Friday and Cyber Monday?For many of us, plenty. And those big cardboard boxes with tiny items inside are just one of the more visceral problems associated with the rapid rise of on-demand online shopping. 

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After Cyber Monday, here comes a new spotlight on e-commerce shipping

With the world heating up, who needs an event such as Burning Man?

July 31, 2019 by  
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The ephemeral city in the desert is seeking to achieve carbon negativity, yet its impact as a cultural movement expands far beyond Black Rock.

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With the world heating up, who needs an event such as Burning Man?

Newlyweds forgo pricey wedding to embark on an incredible tiny home adventure

July 9, 2019 by  
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When Alexandra Steltzer and her partner Jon were planning their wedding, they decided to spend the money they would have spent on a lavish, one-day ceremony on a three-month adventure traveling around the U.S. in a 19-foot-long renovated camper instead. After their wonderful trip, their love of tiny homes on wheels was sealed, and the crafty couple went on to renovate their own permanent tiny home, converting the old RV into a bohemian oasis. After Alexandra and Jon returned from their three-month adventure traveling around the United States, they felt pressured to put down roots and buy a “conventional” home. But soon after moving into a four-bedroom house, the adventurous couple began to feel trapped in the large space. They they decided to make a change, opting instead to downsize to a minimalist lifestyle . Related: Young couple build their own tiny home to avoid sky-high housing prices in the Bay Area The daring duo decided to rent their house out and move into a tiny home on wheels. After purchasing the old camper on Craigslist for just $3,000, Alexandra and Jon went to work doing much of the renovation themselves . The camper is just 240-square-feet of living space , but the savvy interior design makes it feel much larger. In the living room, a cozy L-shaped sofa sits next to the dining/working table that can be pulled away from the wall to make room for dinner guests. The kitchen is also a modern space, with a few vibrant, retro touches, such as the black and white backsplash. The kitchen comes with all of the basic amenities, such as a butcher block countertops and storage. There is also a four-burner stove. The rest of the home is just the right size for the couple, with a small bedroom tucked into the back end of the renovated camper . As for the interior design, Alexandra says that she and Jon have sourced most of the home’s decorations and furnishings secondhand. + Alexandra Steltzer Via Apartment Therapy Images via Alexandra Steltzer

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Newlyweds forgo pricey wedding to embark on an incredible tiny home adventure

A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

May 13, 2019 by  
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An idyllic forestscape setting that lies deep within the Canadian wilderness has inspired Montreal-based firm Appareil Architecture to build a vacation home in the form of two jet-black, pitched-roofed cabins. The Grand-Pic Chalet is actually made up of two monochromatic cottages separated by a connecting wooden deck, which allows the beautiful family home to sit in serene harmony with the surrounding nature. When the homeowners tasked the Canadian firm to create a cabin that would be a welcoming space to host family and friends, the design team was immediately inspired by the building site. Surrounded by soaring evergreen trees and a rolling landscape, the designers were drawn to create a welcoming but sophisticated space that enjoys a strong connection between the home and the forest . Related: The Little House clad in black cedar is nestled among Washington’s evergreens The house is a total of 1,464 square feet separated into two cabins. The main cottage contains the living room and open kitchen area, while the smaller cabin is used as a guest house. In contrast to the black exteriors, the interiors are clad in light Russian plywood panels. The open layout is perfect for socializing, either with a large party or small family gathering. A series of tall, slender windows let optimal natural light into the interior living spaces as well as provide stunning views of the forestscape. Taking inspiration from Nordic traditions, the minimalist interior design is comprised of a neutral color palette and sparse contemporary furnishings. A simple wood-burning chimney sits in the corner to keep the living space warm and cozy. Meanwhile, the core of the design is the open kitchen, which features a large island with bar stool seating — the perfect space for catching up with friends and family. + APPAREIL Architecture Via Archdaily Photography by Félix Michaud via APPAREIL Architecture

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A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

May 3, 2019 by  
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German architect studio, Buero Wagner , designed a modern, chemical-free home using a twist on the traditional Japanese practice of charring wood. The Black House is located near Munich’s Lake Ammersee and features a rural German architecture with a sleek industrial design. It is an addition to an existing family home and uses the site’s natural topography to create a stacked look on the exterior with a fluid, open concept inside. The charred timber façade is a popular trend in Western architecture and uses a sustainable Japanese practice that creates weather-proof wood through a fire-treatment process. The black house has three levels, with the bedroom and open bathroom in the basement level, kitchen and dining in the middle and a living room at the top, all connected by short steps to create modular but overlapping spaces. Related: Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zürich “Spaces and uses form one fluid entity, creating a variety of spatial situations,” said Buero Wagner. Perhaps the most dramatic design element to the house is the pivoting windows on the northwest corner of the living room space. Virtually the entire northern and western walls pivot on an off-center single axis and open up onto the terrace — creating one seamless and open space for hosting. This space also builds a connection from the interior to a small forest outside. The concrete flooring blends seamlessly with the concrete terrace, creating an entirely new, hybrid and open-air space, without a clear line between inside and outside. The house most notably uses a charred wood façade that has a resurgence of popularity in Western architecture. The wood is fire treated and then coated with a natural oil. The result is a jet-black, charcoal aesthetic that is naturally weatherproof. Charred wood is carbonized, which means it is resistant to water , fire, bugs, sun and rot. Despite the charred wood ’s resistant properties, it can be a difficult and tedious process to fire-treat and install. The interior walls and floor utilize an untreated oiled oak combined with slabs of exposed, sandblasted concrete. Together, these materials give the interior an industrial and modern look. A panel heating system is incorporated into the concrete walls and floors, and provides energy efficient  thermal energy storage. + Buero Wagner Via Dezeen Images via Buero Wagner

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This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

Report Report: Banking, blind spots, carbon capture and climate risk

May 1, 2019 by  
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A new BlackRock report on assessing climate-related risks is among the standouts in the latest research.

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Report Report: Banking, blind spots, carbon capture and climate risk

Fund managers worth $10.2 trillion urge oil firms to align with Paris Agreement goals

May 1, 2019 by  
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A new survey of leading fund managers reveals a large majority want oil majors to adopt Paris Agreement-compliant strategies.

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Fund managers worth $10.2 trillion urge oil firms to align with Paris Agreement goals

This tiny home eschews minimalist design for vibrant colors and bold patterns

January 24, 2019 by  
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Most tiny homes tend to go for the standard “less is more” strategy when it comes to interior design. But one Texas designer, Galeana Younger from the Galeana Group , is breaking that mold with her stunning “maximalist” tiny home. Forgoing the typical neutral color palette, Younger decked out the 190-square-foot tiny home with a host of vibrant colors, funky patterns and plenty of personal touches that give the home a jubilant character. Recently, the designer told Lonny that she wanted the tiny home design to be full of fun. “I wanted to create an environment that would allow/encourage people to feel comfortable and happy but still slightly elevated and outside of themselves,” Younger said. “Like they were in a hip, urban locale that made them feel a little more chispa than usual.” Related: The off-grid Eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool, Californian vibes Accordingly, the bold interior design found throughout the home has quite a bit of “spark” from the moment you enter. The living space features a small wicker sofa covered with various pillows in an array of colors and textures. To the right, the bedroom is wallpapered in a lively black and white cactus print. Contrasting the busy pattern on the walls is the ceiling, which is painted a light ethereal blue. A triangle-patterned rug is on the floor, nicely connecting the black door and trim, which is found throughout the interior. Moving into the kitchen , the blast of fun, vibrant colors cannot be missed. The geometric backsplash is comprised of multiple hues and shades that add a sense of whimsy to the cooking area. Open shelving stores the home’s dishware along with decorative bottles in different shapes and colors. Further into the back of the space is the bathroom. Surprisingly spacious for a tiny home, this black and white motif still manages to be filled with personality. The shower stall was hand laid with the words, “Howdy, ya’ll.” Above the bathroom, a ladder leads to a compact sleeping loft . + The Galeana Group Via Curbed Photography by Mark Menjivar via The Galeana Group

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This tiny home eschews minimalist design for vibrant colors and bold patterns

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