Escape the stresses of city life with the off-grid Into the Wild cabin

August 8, 2018 by  
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Slovakian architecture studio Ark Shelter has recently unveiled the latest iteration of its beautiful Ark Shelter—a tiny, self-sufficient unit that can be placed almost anywhere you please. Dubbed the “Into the Wild” cabin, their newest off-grid shelter typology embraces the outdoors from all sides with large walls of glass. Developed from three years of research and development, the Into the Wild cabin offers modern comforts with minimal landscape impact. Prefabricated in a factory offsite, the Into the Wild cabin encompasses nearly 431 square feet of living space. To recede the tiny cabin into the landscape, the architects used black-stained spruce for the exterior cladding. In contrast, the interior is lined in light-colored spruce and fitted out with lacquered oak furnishings and surfaces with a beige finish. Ark Shelter custom-designed the table, dining table, couch and lamp while the drawing and conference table was sourced from Croatian manufacturer Prostoria. Punctuated with glazing on all sides, the light-filled cabin features an open-plan living area, dining space and kitchen, as well as a bathroom, storage space and bedroom space with a concealed Jacuzzi beneath the bed. An extra module added to the top of the cabin creates space for an upper loft that can be used as a second bedroom. The cabin is equipped with solar panels, batteries and rainwater collection systems for off-grid living. Related: 7 charming off-grid homes for a rent-free life “The Shelter, with its low-tech outlook facade, is created so that it attempts to blend with nature, while refining its complex and sophisticated system that automatically works with space and light,” wrote the architects. “Thanks to an automatic system the heating, cooling and shadings can be pre-programmed. The double bed goes up automatically in the ceiling and beneath the bed there is a hidden jacuzzi, creating a new relaxing area.” + Ark Shelter Images by Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma / BoysPlayNice

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Escape the stresses of city life with the off-grid Into the Wild cabin

Handsome timber-clad extension embraces Australias great outdoors

August 3, 2018 by  
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When the residents of a home in Eganstown, Australia, decided to add a modest extension to their house, they were looking for more than just extra breathing room. Enlisting the help of Melbourne-based emerging design practice Solomon Troup Architects , they envisioned the extension as a way to more fully embrace the expansive hillside landscape. The resulting structure—named the Limerick House—does just that, all while referencing the outdoors with its natural materials palette . Covering an area of nearly 2,100 square feet, the Limerick House offers a twist on the original home’s pitched forms with an asymmetrical gabled roof inspired by the lean-to timber shearing sheds found throughout the local landscape. “The gabled form of the addition responds to the existing pitched roofs of the existing house,” explains Solomon Troup Architects. “The new addition has the same dimensions and shape as the existing three railway cottages used to build the existing house, but is sloped on the eastern boundary to create a doorway, used to link the house to another existing house on the property.” In another nod to the local sheds , the new extension is built mainly from timber. Spotted gum decking boards—stained black—clad the exterior and will develop a silvery patina over time. In contrast to the dark facade, the interior is lined with light-colored silvertop ash boards, which the architects say give the addition the look of a “warm winter weekend cabin.” Related: A modular extension boasts a seamless indoor-outdoor living experience The extension houses an open-plan kitchen and dining area, freeing up room in the main house, which now includes a master ensuite, two bedrooms and a living room that opens up to a cozy den through a sliding door. A massive steel-framed pivoting door opens the new structure up to the outdoors and a spacious timber deck partly sheltered by a deep roof overhang. Large windows let in plenty of natural light and views. + Solomon Troup Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Tatjana Plitt

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Handsome timber-clad extension embraces Australias great outdoors

Gorgeous Washington barn house marries rustic elements with modern style

June 19, 2017 by  
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This gorgeous American barnhouse in Washington is the fruit of four years of collaborative architect-client labor. Seattle-based SkB Architects worked together with clients Charlie and Tracey Brown to design and build the Manson Barn, a large and modern multipurpose farmhouse built from the ground up with local materials. The gambrel structure puts a modern twist on traditional American barn vernacular and frames stunning views of the Cascade Mountain Range. Located within twelve acres of apple orchards in central Washington state, the Manson Barn combines a working barn with qualities of a luxury vacation retreat. The 10,000-square-foot barn distinguishes itself from its rural neighbors with its hybrid roof that adds dormers and gull wings to a traditional gambrel roof. The large dormers help break down the scale of the building, increase natural light to the upper levels, and provide additional floor space for guest rooms. Black-stained wood siding clads the exterior, which will develop a silvery gray patina over time, blending into the landscape. The Manson Barn’s ground floor is mostly an open-plan space for entertaining – it includes a commercial kitchen with a custom-design pizza oven, a dining area, and storage for orchard equipment. Large, sliding carriage doors open up to expansive exterior patios on both ends of the building, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living. The garage doors beneath the gull wings also open up to reveal stunning landscape views. A wine cellar with sanded cobblestone flooring is on the basement level. Related: Family renovates century-old barn into stunning modern home in Washington state The upper floor houses the master bedroom, guest bedrooms, and a living area that wraps around the building in mezzanine fashion. The center of the upper floor is left open to the ground floor below. Cedar sink wood pulled from the bottom of a nearby lake was milled and reworked into sliding barn doors in the wine cellar and master bedroom. In a nod to the apple orchards, the architects added a solid wall clad in vintage apple crate panels next to the three-story steel staircase. + SkB Architects

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Gorgeous Washington barn house marries rustic elements with modern style

Green-roofed visitor center blends into Quebecs lakeside landscape

January 23, 2017 by  
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This handsome timber building by the lake looks like a sumptuous holiday retreat, but rest assured it’s open to the public for all to enjoy. Canadian design studio Anne Carrier Architecture completed the visitor center in Quebec’s Mont Orford National Park and skillfully blends the building into the landscape using a black-stained facade and green roof . The building, known as the Bonnallie Services Center, is one of several design projects the architecture firm has completed for the national park. Located next the stunning Stukely Lake, the 430-square-meter Bonnallie Services Center embraces views of the lake and mountains beyond. The two-story building is partially embedded into the earth and is angled to maximize views and frame an outdoor amphitheater . Full-height glazing is installed on the second floor for panoramic viewing and opens up to a covered outdoor terrace with seating. Related: Visitor center disguised as a hill to welcome visitors to Denmark’s historic Kalø Castle Ruins The visitor center is clad in black-stained timber to make the building recede into the landscape. In contrast, the interior is dominated by pale cedar . In addition to a welcome center for visitors, the contemporary building comprises boat maintenance and storage facilities, kitchen, and gift shop. “Exterior and interior spaces are connected by a network of walkways, stairs, covered passages nooks that are inspired by the natural meandering of walking trails,” said the architects to Dezeen . + Anne Carrier Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Anne Carrier Architecture , by Stephane Groleau

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Green-roofed visitor center blends into Quebecs lakeside landscape

Modern timber frame oyster shack grows a garden on its roof

April 17, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Modern timber frame oyster shack grows a garden on its roof Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: black stained timber , Bretagne , france , green roof , minimalist , minimalist design , oyster farmer , oyster hangar , oyster house , oyster shack , Raum architects , timber frame , white timber

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Modern timber frame oyster shack grows a garden on its roof

We Make Carpets creates designs made out of materials like sponges, pasta and little army men

April 17, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of We Make Carpets creates designs made out of materials like sponges, pasta and little army men Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Furniture Fair 2015 , green carpets , green design , milan 2015 , Milan Design , Milan Design Week , Milan Design Week 2015 , Milan Design Week Ventura Lambrate , Milan Fair We Make Carpets , Milan Furniture Fair , Recycled Materials , recycled textiles , Ventura Lambate , we make carpets , We Make Carpets Milan , We Make Carpets recycled rugs , WeMakeCarpets

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We Make Carpets creates designs made out of materials like sponges, pasta and little army men

Contemporary Bungalow Triptych Captures Views and Sunlight in Three Directions

March 28, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Contemporary Bungalow Triptych Captures Views and Sunlight in Three Directions Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: al fresco dining , balck stained larch , black stained timber , Blee Halligan Architects , bungalow triptych , double height windows , framed views , house extension , machester , pitch roof , solar heat gain , sun’s path , timber porch        

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Contemporary Bungalow Triptych Captures Views and Sunlight in Three Directions

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