US govt developing brain implants that give humans the ability to never forget

November 19, 2015 by  
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Supported by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), scientists are hard at work on a brain implant that will grant humans the ability to never forget. The Restoring Active Memory (RAM) project is focused on restoring memory abilities to veterans of the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. If successful, RAM could have an enormous positive impact on the lives of over 300,000 veterans who have returned home with brain injuries. Read the rest of US govt developing brain implants that give humans the ability to never forget

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US govt developing brain implants that give humans the ability to never forget

The Story Pod is a tiny little lending library that glows like a lantern at night

November 19, 2015 by  
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The Story Pod is a tiny little lending library that glows like a lantern at night

Scientists Trick Iron-Eating Bacteria into “Breathing” Electrons in Effort to Create Biofuels

January 29, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock Scientists have developed a technique to “trick” common iron-eating bacteria into capturing electrons which the bacteria uses to grow. Typically the bacteria contributes to corrosion of steel pipelines, bridges and ships, but instead the researchers at the University of Minnesota’s BioTechnology Institute used electrons from an electrode to make the bacteria “breathe.” It’s hoped that the method could be combined with renewable energy sources to developed sustainable biofuels . Scientists Daniel Bond, Zarath Summers and Jeffrey Gralnick of the University of Minnesota’s BioTechnology Institute used the co-called electrochemical cultivation to grow iron-oxidizing bacteria without any presence of iron. By adding marine oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, along with some nutrient medium to an electrode, the bacteria was tricked into consuming electrons as if it were in its natural, iron-saturated environment. The bacteria absorbed electrons directly from the electrode, which enabled it to capture carbon dioxide and multiply. “It’s a new way to cultivate a microorganism that’s been very difficult to study. But the fact that these organisms can synthesize everything they need using only electricity makes us very interested in their abilities,” said Daniel Bond. By funneling electricity generated from renewables to iron-oxidizing bacteria that combines it with carbon dioxide, scientists would be able to create and store biofuels, along with other useful products. The actual process of converting energy in electricity into a product that could be stored in a tank requires additional research, according to Bond. The research will be published in the January issue of mBio , an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. + American Society for Microbiology Via Phys.org Photos from Wikimedia Commons

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Scientists Trick Iron-Eating Bacteria into “Breathing” Electrons in Effort to Create Biofuels

Scientists Trick Iron-Eating Bacteria into “Breathing” Electrons in Effort to Create Biofuels

January 29, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock Scientists have developed a technique to “trick” common iron-eating bacteria into capturing electrons which the bacteria uses to grow. Typically the bacteria contributes to corrosion of steel pipelines, bridges and ships, but instead the researchers at the University of Minnesota’s BioTechnology Institute used electrons from an electrode to make the bacteria “breathe.” It’s hoped that the method could be combined with renewable energy sources to developed sustainable biofuels . Scientists Daniel Bond, Zarath Summers and Jeffrey Gralnick of the University of Minnesota’s BioTechnology Institute used the co-called electrochemical cultivation to grow iron-oxidizing bacteria without any presence of iron. By adding marine oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, along with some nutrient medium to an electrode, the bacteria was tricked into consuming electrons as if it were in its natural, iron-saturated environment. The bacteria absorbed electrons directly from the electrode, which enabled it to capture carbon dioxide and multiply. “It’s a new way to cultivate a microorganism that’s been very difficult to study. But the fact that these organisms can synthesize everything they need using only electricity makes us very interested in their abilities,” said Daniel Bond. By funneling electricity generated from renewables to iron-oxidizing bacteria that combines it with carbon dioxide, scientists would be able to create and store biofuels, along with other useful products. The actual process of converting energy in electricity into a product that could be stored in a tank requires additional research, according to Bond. The research will be published in the January issue of mBio , an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. + American Society for Microbiology Via Phys.org Photos from Wikimedia Commons

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Scientists Trick Iron-Eating Bacteria into “Breathing” Electrons in Effort to Create Biofuels

Recycled Shipping Pallet Pavilion Springs Up in Christchurch, New Zealand

January 28, 2013 by  
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Christchurch, New Zealand suffered a number of devastating earthquakes in the past 2 years, which left almost 200 people dead and thousands without a home. Now artists and architects are rebuilding the city with innovative projects that seek to revitalize open spaces. One of these brilliant projects is the Summer Pallet Pavilion in central Christchurch – an impressive venue made entirely from recycled materials and wooden shipping pallets . Gap Filler collaborated with emerging designers, established professionals, architects and numerous volunteers to create this self-contained space, which is covered in plants and features a stage, several counters/table and a large amount of seating. It is incredible that even in a city that has been reduced to rubble, there is so much inspiration and innovation leading the drive to rebuild. + Pallet Pavilion + Gap Filler Via Rincarnation The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Christchurch , green architecture , green design , New Zealand , pallet pavilion , Recycled Materials , recycled shipping pallets , salvaged pallets , shipping pallets , sustainable design

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Recycled Shipping Pallet Pavilion Springs Up in Christchurch, New Zealand

MIT Turns Carbon Dioxide from Bioengineered Soil Bacteria into Clean Biofuel

January 25, 2013 by  
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Scientists at MIT have genetically engineered a soil bacteria that can create fuel for cars. The bioengineered Ralstonia eutropha converts carbon into isobutanol—an alcohol that can replace or blend with gasoline used by vehicles. The new technology could help reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and significantly decrease our carbon footprint. Read the rest of MIT Turns Carbon Dioxide from Bioengineered Soil Bacteria into Clean Biofuel Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , Advanced Research Projects Agency ARPA-E , Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology , bioengineered bacteria , biofuels , biotechnology , carbon emissions , green technology , isobutanol fuel , MIT Research , Ralstonia eutropha bacteria , scientific research , soil bacteria fuel , U. S. Department of Energy

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MIT Turns Carbon Dioxide from Bioengineered Soil Bacteria into Clean Biofuel

HOK Architects Win Competition to Design One of World’s Most Eco-Friendly Biomedical Research Centers

November 27, 2012 by  
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HOK Architects were just selected from 14 entrants in an international design competition to design the new Ri.MED Biomedical Research and Biotechnology Center (BRBC) in Southern Italy.  The $269 million facility will be at the forefront of modern medicine and will focus on moving the research from the lab to the marketplace in order to prevent or cure diseases. Read the rest of HOK Architects Win Competition to Design One of World’s Most Eco-Friendly Biomedical Research Centers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: architecture competitions , biomedical research centers , eco-friendly research centers , educational architecture , HOK architects , LEED certified buildings , Ri.MED Biomedical Research and Biotechnology Center (BRBC)

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HOK Architects Win Competition to Design One of World’s Most Eco-Friendly Biomedical Research Centers

Within 5 Years, Tires Could be Made From Sugar Cane, Corn, or Switchgrass Instead of Oil

March 26, 2010 by  
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Photo: Flickr , CC The Greenest Tire is No Tire, But if That’s Not Possible… According to the Rubber Manufacturers Association trade group, it takes about 7 gallons of oil to make 1 car tire (the oil is turned into isoprene), and 1 billion of them are made each year.

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Within 5 Years, Tires Could be Made From Sugar Cane, Corn, or Switchgrass Instead of Oil

Good Advice for Green Spring Cleaning

March 26, 2010 by  
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Image credit: Good Spring is here and for most people that means it’s time to open the windows and brush a winter’s worth of dust off the furniture. It’s a lot of work, but celebrating the first warm weekend of spring with a whole-house clean is a refreshing way to welcome the season

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Today on Planet 100: Top 5 Eco-Shock Campaigns (Video)

March 26, 2010 by  
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Today on Planet 100: Top 5 Eco-Shock Campaigns (Video)

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