The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Nutcracker Teach Us About Farming and Regeneration?

October 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Nutcracker Teach Us About Farming and Regeneration?

This morning I awoke to a blanket of soft white icing on the mountains around my Montana cabin , sweetly pink in the first light of day. Winter has breathed its first chill sigh here, and the lodge is shutting down for the season. Golden aspens shiver on the lower slope, eager to be left alone. A jerky movement catches my eye at the tree-line. It’s a woodpecker, I think, seeing him drunkenly flit down toward me. But I’m wrong. His harsh rasping laughs give him away. This is Clark’s nutcracker, sometimes called the Woodpecker Crow. He’s a master trickster in this high pine forest. What’s his game? With a full array of well-crafted tools nested in his chisel-like bill, he’s the ultimate farmer for these north woods. His crop? Read on in today’s Biomimicry Manual to find out more! Read the rest of The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Nutcracker Teach Us About Farming and Regeneration? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioinspiration , biomimicry , Clark’s nutcracker , Learning from nature , regenerative design , symbiosis , The Biomimicry Manual , whitebark pine , woodpecker crow        

See the original post here: 
The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Nutcracker Teach Us About Farming and Regeneration?

The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Frigate Bird Teach Us about Flight?

September 9, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Frigate Bird Teach Us about Flight?

The frigatebird is a powerful and aggressive seabird, with a deserved reputation as the pirate of the high seas. One of world’s fastest birds, he swoops and soars up to 100 miles an hour, spending up to 12 days at a time on the wing, even sleeping in the air. He ekes out a tenuous existence from the resource-poor surface of the tropical ocean, in a environment with little nesting land. To achieve this, the frigate has jettisoned anything not essential to life in the air. His tiny feet and legs do not allow him to sit or walk, and its seven-foot wingspan skeleton weighs only 4 ounces: less than his feathers. What can this exquisitely evolved aerial acrobat teach us about flight ? Find out in today’s entry of The Biomimicry Manual . Read the rest of The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Frigate Bird Teach Us about Flight? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal inspired design , animals and design , bioinspiration , biomimicry , design inspired by nature , flight adaptation , flight design , frigate , frigate bird , inspiration in nature , mother nature inspiration , nature and design , The Biomimicry Manual , what can we learn from animals        

Read the original here:
The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Frigate Bird Teach Us about Flight?

Poachers in Zimbabwe Dump Cyanide into Water Holes, Kill 41 Elephants

September 9, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Poachers in Zimbabwe Dump Cyanide into Water Holes, Kill 41 Elephants

Poachers in Zimbabwe have taken their hunt for elephants to a whole new level by poisoning their watering hole. Six men have been arrested in connection with the deaths of forty-one elephants in Harare that drank from a water source poisoned with cyanide. The men are suspected of amassing a stockpile of ivory tusks by poisoning several watering holes frequented by elephants in the region. Read the rest of Poachers in Zimbabwe Dump Cyanide into Water Holes, Kill 41 Elephants Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , elephant poachers , elephants poisoned by cyanide , endangered species , green design , Hwange National Park , sustainable design , Wildlife conservation , wildlife news , Zimbabwe elephants , zimbabwe poachers        

Excerpt from:
Poachers in Zimbabwe Dump Cyanide into Water Holes, Kill 41 Elephants

John Dabiri Uses Biomimicry to Design Cheaper, More Efficient Wind Farms Inspired by Schools of Fish

July 15, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on John Dabiri Uses Biomimicry to Design Cheaper, More Efficient Wind Farms Inspired by Schools of Fish

Wind turbine designs have improved significantly in recent years, but wind farms are still pretty inefficient. That’s because traditional wind turbines — the ones with three huge blades — interfere with each other. Putting two or more large turbines in close proximity produces wind blocks and vortices that decrease the efficiency of the overall wind farm. But CalTech biophysicist and MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” winner John Dabiri discovered a solution to that problem by studying the movement of schools fish . He found that vertical-axis wind turbines with blades that resemble fins can work together to more efficiently harness wind energy. Read the rest of John Dabiri Uses Biomimicry to Design Cheaper, More Efficient Wind Farms Inspired by Schools of Fish Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “wind power” , bioinspiration , biomimicry , John Dabiri , renewable energy , VAWTs , vertical axis wind turbines , wind energy , Wind Farms , wind turbines , windmills        

Continued here:
John Dabiri Uses Biomimicry to Design Cheaper, More Efficient Wind Farms Inspired by Schools of Fish

How the business of biomimicry is happening at the zoo

February 26, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How the business of biomimicry is happening at the zoo

Believe it's true  —  nature and tech are partnering at the San Diego Zoo's Centre for Bioinspiration.

Original post:
How the business of biomimicry is happening at the zoo

Bad Behavior has blocked 3084 access attempts in the last 7 days.