How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

October 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

In order to preserve biodiversity, we need to protect land — land that’s been resettled for agriculture.

Read the original post:
How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

October 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

In order to preserve biodiversity, we need to protect land — land that’s been resettled for agriculture.

Read more from the original source:
How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

Earth911 Podcast, Sep. 3, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Land Restoration with Adam Sachs

September 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earth911 Podcast, Sep. 3, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Land Restoration with Adam Sachs

Adam Sachs, Executive Director of Biodiversity for a Livable Climate, … The post Earth911 Podcast, Sep. 3, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Land Restoration with Adam Sachs appeared first on Earth911.com.

Originally posted here:
Earth911 Podcast, Sep. 3, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear — Land Restoration with Adam Sachs

When it comes to habitat, having an edge is not a good thing

August 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on When it comes to habitat, having an edge is not a good thing

The side effects for biodiversity and species conservation aren’t usually positive. Here are four ways that businesses can mitigate the impact.

Read more from the original source:
When it comes to habitat, having an edge is not a good thing

Can businesses practice profitable conservation?

August 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Can businesses practice profitable conservation?

Investing in the environment proves valuable for all organizations. Here’s how.

Read the original here:
Can businesses practice profitable conservation?

How to effectively design for a biodiverse, urban future

June 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How to effectively design for a biodiverse, urban future

We need to make our city areas more welcoming to wildlife. Here are five ways we can do so.

More:
How to effectively design for a biodiverse, urban future

We calculated how much money planting trees can save for your city

June 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on We calculated how much money planting trees can save for your city

From Beijing to Cairo to Mexico City to New York.

Read the original post:
We calculated how much money planting trees can save for your city

Dropping the ball: how the sports industry affects biodiversity

June 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Dropping the ball: how the sports industry affects biodiversity

A Q&A with Giulia Carbone of IUCN on how she works with key stakeholders to turn challenges in the sports industry into sustainable opportunities.

See the original post:
Dropping the ball: how the sports industry affects biodiversity

One-third of the world’s protected areas face ‘shocking’ human impact

May 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on One-third of the world’s protected areas face ‘shocking’ human impact

Bad news for wildlife: 2.3 million square miles of protected areas around the world face human pressure from activities like road building, urbanization, or grazing, according to a new study . Lead author Kendall Jones, a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland , said in a statement , “We found major road infrastructure such as highways, industrial agriculture, and even entire cities occurring inside the boundaries of places supposed to be set aside for nature conservation .” Millions of square miles “have this level of human influence that is harmful to the species they are trying to protect,” University of Queensland professor James Watson told the BBC . “It is not passive, it’s not agnostic; it is harmful and that is quite shocking.” Scientists at the University of Queensland, University of Northern British Columbia , and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) teamed up for the study, described as a reality check, that was recently published in the journal Science . Related: Chile creates five new national parks from 10 million acres of land in historic act Watson said that governments claim the areas are protected “when in reality they aren’t.” Even though more land has been protected in the last few decades, the lack of real protection is a major reason for  biodiversity ‘s continued, catastrophic decline. There was a ray of hope in the study’s findings: protected areas that have strict biodiversity conservation objectives in place tend to experience less human pressure. WCS listed the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary in Cambodia, the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador, and the Madidi National Park in Bolivia as examples. Watson said, “We know protected areas work — when well-funded, well-managed and well placed, they are extremely effective in halting the threats that cause biodiversity loss and ensure species return from the brink of extinction . There are also many protected areas that are still in good condition and protect the last strongholds of endangered species worldwide. The challenge is to improve the management of those protected areas that are most valuable for nature conservation to ensure they safeguard it.” + Wildlife Conservation Society + University of Queensland + Science Via the BBC Image via Depositphotos

Here is the original post: 
One-third of the world’s protected areas face ‘shocking’ human impact

Scientists predict catastrophic loss of forest fauna and flora with existing CO2 emissions

March 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists predict catastrophic loss of forest fauna and flora with existing CO2 emissions

If we don’t do something to slow down carbon emissions, we could lose up to half of all the plant and animal species in the world’s forests. A new report by the World Wildlife Federation shows that a temperature increase of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius would decimate the flora and fauna of vital ecosystems in Asia, Africa, North America, South America and Australia. Since scientists project that we are likely headed towards a rise of 3.2C, the implications could be disastrous. According to the study, a rise of 3.2C would kill off 60 percent of plant species and 50 percent of animal species in the Amazon . If countries get their act together and limit temperature rise to 2C, we will lose fewer species, but the devastation will still destroy 35 percent of species. Then there’s the grim forecast of a rise of 4.5C, which is what many experts believe we will hit if emissions remain unchanged. In that scenario, we could expect to lose more than 70 percent of reptiles and plants, and 60 percent of mammals and birds. Related: Scientists warn Amazon jungle faces “death spiral” The picture is just as dire in Africa and Australia, but with an additional impact to some species based on tension with human needs. According to the study, competition for resources in Africa, Bangladesh, Madagascar and the Caribbean could devastate animals, such as elephants , even more. “For the Amazon and Guianas, the WWF report is scary as hell. The loss of half or more of the region’s stunning plant diversity would be a biological blow of almost unimaginable severity,” said William Laurence, director at the Center for Tropical Environmental and Sustainable Science. “However, such computer models with all their assumptions and complexities are really ‘scientific cartoons’ giving us only a rough sketch of the future. But even if they’re only half right, these are very frightening cartoons indeed,” he continued. The study was published by the WWF, James Cook University and the University of East Anglia in the journal Climate Change . Via The Guardian Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

Read more: 
Scientists predict catastrophic loss of forest fauna and flora with existing CO2 emissions

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2050 access attempts in the last 7 days.