Scientists may have just found the chemical "missing link" for the origins of life on Earth

November 7, 2017 by  
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In attempting to recreate the conditions of Earth circa billions of years ago, a research team may have uncovered a key “missing link” in our knowledge of the origin of life on Earth. The discovery of diamidophosphate (DAP), a compound that may have been present in early Earth, is an exciting step forward in understanding how early life emerged from various ingredients and conditions. “It reminds me of the Fairy Godmother in Cinderella, who waves a wand and ‘poof,’ ‘poof,’ ‘poof,’ everything simple is transformed into something more complex and interesting,” said Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy , senior author of the study published in  Nature Chemistry  and chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in California. The key to DAP’s “magic” is its ability to facilitate a process called phosphorylation, an essential process in the function of chemicals from neurotransmitters to proteins , and the linking of a particular compound with a phosphate. This process is very common in biochemistry and enables proteins, neurotransmitters and countless other chemicals to function within organic systems. To determine DAP’s fitness to facilitate the origins of life, the team checked DAP’s ability to phosphorylate with several crucial organic compounds. These included RNA, which is essential for the decoding and messaging of genetic information as well as protein synthesis, fatty acids, which make up cell membranes, and amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Related: Researchers shocked to discover protein that conducts electricity All of the tested organic chemicals, when mixed with water and an additional chemical thought to be found on early Earth, successfully reacted with the DAP. While scientists lack the ability to truly know what early Earth was like, or whether the origin of life involved DAP, these experiments show one feasible path through which life could have developed. Via Newsweek Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Scientists may have just found the chemical "missing link" for the origins of life on Earth

MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

November 7, 2017 by  
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The wait is over— MUJI’s microhomes are now officially on sale to the public. Ever since MUJI debuted their line of tiny prefabricated homes in 2015, fans of the minimalist design brand have eagerly awaited the chance to get their hands on one of their tiny prefabricated homes, called MUJI Huts , starting at a little over $26,000 USD. Per MUJI’s famous minimalist aesthetic, the MUJI Huts are elegant and understated. Timber surfaces and a light-tone color palette creates a cozy and welcoming character. The first MUJI Hut to hit the market is a compact 9-square-meter cabin clad in blackened timber and lined in domestic fir wood. Sliding glass doors let in ample natural light and open up to a small covered patio. The simplicity of the design makes it easy for the microhome to adapt to variety of environments and uses. Related: MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall Base pricing for the MUJI Hut starts at 3 million yen (approximately $26,340 USD), tax and construction costs included. Insulation and electrical outlets are optional add-ons. Unfortunately, MUJI Hut is presently only available for sale in Japan—lucky residents can order a microhome from MUJI’s global flagship store at Yurakucho —but fans of the microhome are always welcome to test drive a MUJI Hut at the MUJI Camp in Tsumagoi , about an hour out of Tokyo via bullet train. + MUJI Hut Via SoraNews24

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MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

16-Year-Old Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair 2014 With World-Changing Crop Yield Breakthrough

September 24, 2014 by  
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Irish teenagers Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey and Sophie Healy-Thow , all 16, have won the Google Science Fair 2014 . Their project, Combating the Global Food Crisis , aims to provide a solution to low crop yields  by pairing a nitrogen-fixing bacteria that naturally occurs in the soil with cereal crops it does not normally associate with, such as barley and oats. The results were incredible: the girls found their test crops germinated in half the time and had a drymass yield up to 74 percent greater than usual. Read the rest of 16-Year-Old Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair 2014 With World-Changing Crop Yield Breakthrough Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2014 , agriculture , Émer Hickey , biochemistry , Ciara Judge , food security , global food crisis , good bacteria , Google Science Fair , increased crop yield , Ireland , Irish teenagers win Google Science Fair 2014 , nitrogen fixing , rhizobia , Sophie Healy-Thow , symbiotic relationship , world hunger

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16-Year-Old Irish Girls Win Google Science Fair 2014 With World-Changing Crop Yield Breakthrough

Colorful Intricate Insects Made from Recycled Prints and Magazines

September 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Colorful Intricate Insects Made from Recycled Prints and Magazines Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , IGEPA Benelux paper , origami , Paper Craft , recycled paper , Soon Agency , sustainable design

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Colorful Intricate Insects Made from Recycled Prints and Magazines

Marin Sawa’s “Algaerium” Incorporates Algae Into Interior Design

November 8, 2010 by  
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Architect and textile designer Marin Sawa ’s beautiful work explores ways that we can incorporate the production of biofuels within our built environments . With her Algaerium, she has created a series of living surfaces and textiles that cultivate and produce green energy in the form of algae. Read the rest of Marin Sawa’s “Algaerium” Incorporates Algae Into Interior Design http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3-dimensional textiles , 3-dimetional textiles , biochemistry , biomimetics , craft vs

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Marin Sawa’s “Algaerium” Incorporates Algae Into Interior Design

Glaxo Smith Kline Will Build Largest Rooftop Solar Array

November 8, 2010 by  
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Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) have announced that they will build the largest solar rooftop array in North America at its distribution center in York, PA .  The rooftop array will be the size of  seven American football fields (360,000 square feet) and generate enough solar energy to support the entire pharmaceutical facility, making it the first GSK building to be completely powered by renewable energy. Read the rest of Glaxo Smith Kline Will Build Largest Rooftop Solar Array http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: glaxosmithkline distribution centre solar , glaxosmithkline solar array , gsk building , gsk fresno facility , gsk philadelphia facility , gsk renewable energy , gsk solar array , gsk solar energy , gsk solar facility

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Glaxo Smith Kline Will Build Largest Rooftop Solar Array

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