Compact floating cabin pops up on water in extreme remote locations

August 11, 2017 by  
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Russian firm BIO-architects recently unveiled their latest modern modular cabin—and this one floats on water. Prefabricated offsite, the DD16 house was dropped on a lake near Moscow and is lightweight and durable enough to float and withstand harsh winter extremes. Designed for remote locations, the off-grid cabin uses solar energy for electricity, draws fresh water from the lake, and uses a composting toilet for waste. The 16-square-meter DD16 cabin is a prototype that is being tested through rentals under the DublDomClub organization. The house comprises two modules prefabricated at a factory and constructed with a laminated timber frame with milled ports. “The prototype was designed and made as a tourist equipment where the weight of every detail is taken into account so it can be used in very harsh conditions,” wrote the architects. “All the constructive elements were subject to change as well as the interior finishing compared to the regular houses.” The milled ports help reduce the structure’s weight and minimize cold bridges and gaps. Lightweight polyurethane foam is used for insulation, while the facade is clad in lightweight composite aluminum sheets for a seamless finish from top to bottom. The cabin was also constructed with modular pontoons that are used to support the floating structure and can be disassembled and stored inside the cabin during transport. DD16 can be easily put in place with a crane or helicopter thanks to beam releases that make it easy for just one person to do the rigging work. Related: Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance The customizable interior features a double bed, bathroom with shower, dining table, and living room where a wood-burning stove can be installed. Despite the compact size, the cabin feels surprisingly spacious thanks to the glazed end wall that lets in a great amount of natural light and blurs the distinction between indoor and outdoor living. Hidden storage and transforming furniture also help reduce visual clutter. The DD16 prototype is currently being rented out to clients seeking a unique retreat in wilderness. The team plans to test the house is different extreme conditions. + BIO-architects Images © Vlad Mitrichev and Ivan Ovchinnikov

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Compact floating cabin pops up on water in extreme remote locations

Swanky laneway house in Melbourne is built of recycled red brick

August 11, 2017 by  
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Austin Maynard Architects continues their valiant fight against the cookie-cutter McMansions of Australia with a beautiful new project built of recycled red brick. Located in Richmond, Melbourne within a laneway, the Brickface is a compact house addition at the end of the existing building’s rear yard. The modern and playful extension includes a garage on the ground level, studio living/guest suite above, and a roof deck. Brickface stands out from its laneway neighbors thanks to its recycled red brick facade, large round windows, sculptural form, and garage doors that are painted black instead of white to recede into the building face. The side of the extension facing the main house features an eye-catching outdoor spiral staircase, as well as a playful extruded pattern of red and blue glazed brick from the PGH Vibrant range. A new entertaining space with a pool and terrace was built between the existing home’s main living area and Brickface. “Melbourne’s property market is so inflated, that we’re now seeing a generation that are not only unable to buy a home, but also struggling to find affordable places to rent close to their work, school and community,” wrote Austin Maynard Architects. “ Melbourne does have one trick up its sleeve that many parents are increasingly exploring. Melbourne is strewn with under-utilised laneways and many home owners are creating a second residence in their backyard with frontage to the laneway, where their adult children can live during university and early employment. These second residences are becoming fully independent studio homes for adult children, allowing them to save and plan, whilst continuing to contribute to the essence of Melbourne’s most vibrant and cultural suburbs.” Related: Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions Flexibility was built into Brickface’s design. The ground-floor garage can be easily adapted into a large living space or even an office. The high-ceilinged contemporary interiors are filled with natural light and the walls painted a bright light blue. The accessible roof terrace can be used for entertaining and as garden space. + Austin Maynard Architects Images by Tess Kelly

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Swanky laneway house in Melbourne is built of recycled red brick

MyBioPod Connects Nature and Technology to Create Miniature Worlds

May 10, 2012 by  
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Scottish designer Peter Ananin has created a way to bring a little more of the outside world into our everyday lives by creating personal miniature rural worlds dubbed MyBioPod . MyBioPod provides people with green fingers, a scientific streak or city dwellers with an innovative way to feel a little more connected to the natural world, as nature and technology are combined into a single device to study small ecosystems. Read the rest of MyBioPod Connects Nature and Technology to Create Miniature Worlds Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bio , Design , eco design , ecosystem study , Eden Project , environmental design , green design , mybiopod , Nature , peter ananin , Scotland , sustainable design , sustainable learning , Technology

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MyBioPod Connects Nature and Technology to Create Miniature Worlds

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