Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

April 11, 2017 by  
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Biology may hold the clues to better batteries . An international team of scientists designed a porous material inspired by the vascular structure of leaves that could make energy transfers more efficient. Similar to the way leaf veins efficiently transport nutrients, this material could help rechargeable batteries perform better and last longer. A team of researchers led by Xianfeng Zheng of China’s Wuhan University of Technology and Australia’s University of Queensland scrutinized the way leaf veins optimize the flow of nutrients, with minimum energy consumption, “by branching out to smaller scales” according to the University of Cambridge , and then applied that to their groundbreaking porous material. The nature-inspired material could help relieve stresses in battery electrodes that currently limit their lifespan. The material could also enhance the charge and discharge process. Related: American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution The team calls their product Murray material after Murray’s Law. Cambridge said according to the rule the whole network of pores in biological systems is connected in a manner “to facilitate the transfer of liquids and minimize resistance throughout the network.” Scientist Bao-Lian Su of Cambridge, Wuhan University of Technology, and University of Namur in Belgium said they applied that biological law to chemistry , saying, “The introduction of the concept of Murray’s Law to industrial processes could revolutionize the design of reactors with highly enhanced efficiency, minimum energy, time, and raw material consumption for a sustainable future.” The scientists applied Murray material to gas sensing and photocatalysis as well. Su is a co-author on a paper published online by Nature Communications late last week. There are seven other co-authors on the paper from institutions in China, Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Another co-author, Tawfique Hasan of Cambridge University, said it could be possible to manufacture the porous material on a large scale. Via the University of Cambridge Images via Christoph Rupprecht on Flickr and Pixabay

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Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can Sloths Teach Us About Energy Efficiency?

September 13, 2013 by  
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It’s a scientific fact that there’s nothing cuter than a baby sloth in a bucket. But even if Facebook ‘likes’ turn out not to correlate with biological fitness, sloths are a runaway success by any measure. Well, maybe not so much ‘runaway.’ But it’s certainly true they’re not going anywhere. Sloths have an outstanding survival strategy, as their unexpectedly high density in South and Central American tropical forests attests. In some areas, sloths consume half the energy and make up two-thirds of mammalian biomass. That’s a lot of sloths. But it’s hard to see them because they hardly move—their leafy diets just don’t provide enough energy for them to monkey around. How do they succeed on such meager rations? Simple. They are consummate energy misers. Can humans learn something about conserving energy from the sloth? Read today’s entry of  The Biomimicry Manual to find out! Read the rest of The Biomimicry Manual: What Can Sloths Teach Us About Energy Efficiency? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , bio-inspiration , biomimicry , design by nature , design inspiration , hanging gardens , hanging lamps , hanging plants , industrial ecology , inspiration from nature , kalundborg , sloth in a bucket , sloth moth , sloths , symbiosis , The Biomimicry Manual        

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can Sloths Teach Us About Energy Efficiency?

Algaerium Bioprinter 3D-Prints Nutrient-Rich Algae Superfood at Home!

September 13, 2013 by  
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In just a short time, 3D printing has revolutionized the industries of medicine , tech , and design – and the technology’s next breakthrough application could revolutionize our food system. PhD researcher Marin Sawa has developed an “Algaerium Bioprinter” that can produce nutrient-rich microalgae to alleviate food security issues in the future. Read the rest of Algaerium Bioprinter 3D-Prints Nutrient-Rich Algae Superfood at Home! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed algae , Algaerium Bioprinter , eco design , green design , Marin Sawa , sustainable design        

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Algaerium Bioprinter 3D-Prints Nutrient-Rich Algae Superfood at Home!

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