10 Unexpected new recipes that feature delicious winter vegetables

November 12, 2016 by  
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For many people, the idea of eating seasonally is a brilliant idea. That is until the colder months roll along. After all, there’s a spectacular amount of produce available to be played with from early spring to mid autumn, but once Halloween passes, the culinary palette seems to be comprised of a few scant offerings. This couldn’t be further from the truth! Root vegetables, brassicas, winter greens, and hard-fleshed fruit can be fabulous when paired the right way. Below are a few ideas for using seasonal produce to its greatest potential. Cabbage and Ramen Noodle Salad This salad may sound a bit weird, but the flavors all combine gorgeously into a fun, crunchy autumn/winter dish. 1 head of napa cabbage, shredded finely 1 bunch of green onions, sliced 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 package of ramen noodles, broken up into small pieces 1 cup slivered almonds 1/4 cup cider vinegar 3/4 cup vegetable oil 2-3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari Blend the cabbage and green onions in a large bowl, and refrigerate until ready to serve. In a large skillet, melt the butter or margarine on medium-high heat, and toss in the ramen noodles and almonds. Use a spatula to turn this mixture often, and remove your pan from the heat once the majority of it has been browned. Set aside. For the dressing, heat the vinegar, oil, sugar, and soy sauce in a small pot on medium-high heat. Allow it to boil for about a minute, then set aside to allow it to cool for a bit. Combine the cabbage and ramen-nut mixture with a set of salad tongs, and mix the dressing into it just before serving so it doesn’t get soggy. Root Veggie Chips Take a quick jaunt over to Amy’s Cooking Adventures for an incredible tutorial on how to make perfect root vegetable chips . These are great alternatives to chips for scooping up your favorite dips, and if you use veggies like watermelon radish, heirloom carrots, and a bunch of different beets, you’ll have a veritable rainbow of snacks to nibble. I like to spice mine up with cumin, paprika, garlic powder, and onion salt, but they’re delightful plain as well. Stems and Roots Slaw You can use whatever root vegetables you have in the house for this, and adapt it to your own tastes. I like to add in grated apple on occasion, or switch out the lemon juice with orange instead. Sometimes I’ll even throw in toasted nuts and dried cranberries. Be creative! 2 carrots (different colors, if available), julienned 1 bulb fennel, shredded 2 radishes (if you can get 2 different colors, all the better), grated or julienned 1 golden beet, grated 2 broccoli stems, peeled and julienned 1/2 small celeriac root , peeled and julienned 1/2 red onion, peeled and sliced thinly 1 cup plain yogurt (dairy or soy) 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon lemon juice Salt and pepper Combine all the shredded vegetables into a large bowl. Blend the yogurt , lemon juice, and mustard together and pour over the vegetables, tossing the lot to combine it. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Refrigerate for 30 minutes before serving. Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Now, this isn’t so much a recipe as a basic idea that you can add to with whatever suits your own whims. I usually use one sweet potato per person eating, and fill with a variety of different bits, depending on what I have in the house. Preheat your oven to 400 F. Poke a few holes in your sweet potatoes , and bake for 1 hour or until soft and tender. You can also cook your potatoes in the microwave for 10 to 15 minutes or until soft, but since I haven’t had a microwave in over a decade, I can’t vouch for this method. When the sweet potatoes are cooked,  slice a piece off the top lengthwise, and scoop out the flesh so you have a nice big bowl to fill up. At this point, I generally use a bit of what I’ve scooped out as part of the filling that’ll go back in (the rest goes into soups and such). I like to create a spicy, smoky black bean veggie chili, into which I pop some of the sweet potato and a bit of cooked quinoa. That gets ladled into the potato shells, topped with cubed avocado, corn salsa, and a dollop of plain yogurt. Tuscan Kale and White Bean Soup This is a great warming dish for a chilly day, and it’s packed with iron and protein. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup yellow onion, diced 4 large garlic cloves, chopped coarsely 4 cups vegetable or onion broth/stock 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped finely 4 cups chopped kale 1 large can Italian-style diced tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste Salt, pepper 2 large carrots, peeled and diced 1 large can of white cannellini beans, drained and rinsed (use white kidney beans if cannellinis aren’t available) Sautee the onion in the olive oil until it softens, and then add in the garlic. Cook for an additional minute or so, but don’t allow the garlic to brown. All all remaining ingredients except the beans, cover with a lid, and cook on medium heat for 8-10 minutes. Add in the beans, stir thoroughly, and season with the salt and pepper to taste. I generally deglaze the onions with a bit of wine before adding in the veggies, and I tend to add a kick of spice with some cayenne pepper and smoked paprika, but do what you like to make this soup your own. Squash and Winter Greens Salad I don’t have a recipe for this per se, as it depends on many variables, so feel free to adapt it however you like. To make this, I grab an acorn or delicata squash, slice it into half-moons, remove the peel, drizzle it with olive oil and salt, and roast it at 425 F for about 20 minutes, or until it’s browning and fork-tender. Set that aside to cool. In a large bowl, mix together whichever winter greens you like best (I like spinach, sliced endives, and arugula that I’ve grown on my windowsill, but massaged kale works well too), nuts of your choice (try sunflower seeds or walnut pieces), and any other produce you think would work well in here. I’m fond of adding sliced of pears, but if you prefer a salad that’s less sweet, you can use halved cooked fingerling potatoes, shredded beets, etc. For the dressing, whisk together a simple vinaigrette with a couple of tablespoons each of lemon juice and vinegar, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, and 1 teaspoon honey or agave syrup. Toss the greens together and top with the squash. If you’re not vegan, feel free to add some crumbled feta or chèvre on top for a lovely, creamy note. Roasted Purple Potato and Beet Tarte Tatin This gorgeous, gluten-free dish is as delicious as it is colorful. It’s perfect for a special occasion brunch, or even a light supper with a side salad and bowl of soup. The recipe can be found on the Canelle etVanille website, and is absolutely worth trying out as soon as you can. Sweet and Sour Cauliflower Say that out loud a couple of times and just try to stop yourself from smiling. This is fabulous with rice, or even on its own as an appetizer or light lunch. 1 small head of cauliflower, cut into florets 1 tablespoon flaxseed meal 2 tablespoons water 1/3 cup water 1/3 cup corn starch 1/4 cup flour 1 teaspoon oil Oil for frying Mix all of the ingredients together and let sit for a few minutes to form a batter. Its consistency should be that of a thick pancake batter, but if you feel that it’s too gummy, add a bit more water. Heat approximately 1/2 a cup of oil in a large skillet until it spits when a water droplet is flicked at it. Dip each cauliflower floret into to batter, and then fry in the oil until browned and crispy. Drain on some paper towels or newspaper. For the sauce: 4 garlic cloves, minced 5 or 6 green onions, sliced thinly 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons of soy sauce or tamari 2 tablespoons white or rice vinegar The zest and juice of 1 orange 1/4 teaspoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon corn starch Saute garlic in a bit of oil for a minute or so, then add the green onions, and both the orange zest and juice. Cook for another minute or so, and then add in the rest of the ingredients. Whisk this together as it comes to a boil, and then remove it from the heat. Toss your cauliflower nuggets into this sauce, ensure that they’re coated well, and then serve immediately. Perfect Brussels Sprouts Most people cringe at the thought of eating these mini brassicas, but they’re one of my all-time favourite veggies. The key is to roast them in order to bring out their natural sweetness. 1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon black pepper Preheat your oven to 400 F. Use a sharp knife to cut the stem ends off the Brussels sprouts, and be sure to remove any loose or yellowed outer leaves. Cut the larger sprouts in half lengthwise, and then toss the lot in a large bowl with olive oil, salt, garlic powder, and pepper. Pour these into a shallow baking dish or baking pan and roast for about 40 minutes, until the outsides are crunchy and the insides are slurpy-soft. Sprinkle with a bit more salt (if desired) and serve hot. Pear, Fig, and Goat Cheese Pizza A vegan version of this can be created by using a sour cashew “cheese” in lieu of chèvre.   1 lb pizza dough 1/4 to 1/3 cup fig jam 1 large bosc pear, sliced thinly 1/3 cup goat cheese (soft chevre), or soft cashew cheese Additional cheese (dairy or vegan) of your choice. (I like to dot this pizza with bits of gorgonzola, but it’s also lovely with fontina, gruyere, or even mozzarella Daiya shreds) Slices of prosciutto (if you eat meat and happen to like it) Preheat oven to 450 F. Oil a round cookie sheet, and then place a couple of pieces of parchment onto it. Oil that too. Soften the fig jam by placing the jar in warm water for 5-10 minutes, and then spread the jam over the crust, leaving a 1-inch border, since it’ll ooze as it warms up. Top with pear slices, and crumble the goat cheese around fairly evenly. If you’re using prosciutto, now’s the time to lay it on, and then sprinkle with any remaining cheese, if desired. Bake for 12-15 minutes until the edges of the crust are brown, and the cheese is bubbly. Shake the pizza free from the sheet onto a wire cooling rack, let it sit until it’s less likely to burn your face off from the inside, then place upon a large cutting board, slice up, and serve. All images via  Shutterstock

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10 Unexpected new recipes that feature delicious winter vegetables

DIY Foodie Gift: 7 Easy Recipes for Pickled Veggies

December 6, 2013 by  
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If you’re fond of making food gifts for the holidays , chances are that you’ve already started baking or assembling tasty niblets like almond bark, cookies, fudge, and other tasty treats. Although most people have a soft spot for sweets on special occasions, there may be some family members and friends whose tastes lean towards salty, sour, and spicy rather than sugary—a perfect opportunity for you to do a little bit of weekend canning to make easy, tasty pickles from a variety of veggies . Below are some recipes that are sure to please any foodie on your list. Read the rest of DIY Foodie Gift: 7 Easy Recipes for Pickled Veggies Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beet , beet relish , beets , canning , canning DIY , Christmas , christmas presents , DIY , diy gifts , DIY pickle gift , diy presents , easy pickles , hanukkah , holiday gift , Holiday present , holiday presents , holidays , Kwanzaa , mushrooms , onions , pickled beets , pickled mushrooms , pickled onions , Pickled vegetables , pickled veggies , pickles , pickling , solstice , Xmas , xmas gifts , xmas presents , Yule        

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Texas A&M Unveils the World’s Biggest Gingerbread House!

December 6, 2013 by  
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What do you get when you combine 1,800 pounds of butter, 7,200 eggs, 7,200 pounds of flour and truck-loads of candy? The world’s biggest gingerbread house! Located at the Texas A & M Traditions Club and certified by the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest gingerbread house ever, the 39,000 cubic foot (and 36-million calorie) structure is big enough to live in and even has electricity. All proceeds earned from the sweet house will go to charity, and while you can’t actually take a bite (it’s roped off), you can go for a visit. Read the rest of Texas A&M Unveils the World’s Biggest Gingerbread House! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Biggest Gingerbread House , Bill Horton , Bill Horton Traditions Club , Guinness , Guinness Largest Gingerbread House , St. Joseph Health System , St. Joseph Health System Trauma Center , texas a&m , Texas A&M Fundraiser , Texas A&M Gingerbread House , Texas A&M Traditions Club , Texas Gingerbread House , Traditions Club Gingerbread House , World Record Gingerbread House , World Records , World’s Largest Gingerbread House        

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Texas A&M Unveils the World’s Biggest Gingerbread House!

Moringa Oleifera Tree Seed Extracts Purify Water Naturally

December 6, 2013 by  
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Moringa Oliefera tree seeds via Shutterstock A seed extract from the Moringa Oleifera tree could provide a natural and inexpensive solution for water purification . Through a collaborative research project between Uppsala University, Institut Laue-Langevin in France and the NIST Center for Neutron Research in the USA has optimized the process to make the seed extract even better at removing particulates from water. The new research gives improved insight and could now be advanced for use in larger-scale water treatment plants. Read the rest of Moringa Oleifera Tree Seed Extracts Purify Water Naturally Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: drumstick tree , horseradish tree , Institut Laue-Langevin , moringa , moringa oleifere tree , moringa tree , natural water filtration methods , NIST Center for Neutron Research , seed extract , uppsalla university , water filter , water filtration , water issues , water purification        

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Moringa Oleifera Tree Seed Extracts Purify Water Naturally

10 Unexpected New Recipes That Feature Yummy Winter Vegetables

November 6, 2013 by  
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For many people, the idea of eating seasonally is a brilliant idea. That is until the colder months roll along. After all, there’s a spectacular amount of produce available to be played with from early spring to mid autumn, but once Halloween passes, the culinary palette seems to be comprised of a few scant offerings. This couldn’t be further from the truth! Root vegetables, brassicas, winter greens, and hard-fleshed fruit can be fabulous when paired the right way. Below are a few ideas for using seasonal produce to its greatest potential. Read the rest of 10 Unexpected New Recipes That Feature Yummy Winter Vegetables Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autumn , autumn vegetables , beans , beets , carrots , eating seasonally , eating with the seasons , fall , fall cooking , fall vegetables , kale , parsnip , roots , salads , soup , squash , vegan , vegetables , vegetarian , veggies , winter        

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10 Unexpected New Recipes That Feature Yummy Winter Vegetables

The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables

December 17, 2012 by  
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Want to throw down some sick underground beats using vegetables that actually grow underground? Get back to your musical roots by jamming on the BeetBox , a simple musical instrument powered by a Raspberry Pi with a capacitive touch sensor, audio amplifier, wooden box, and six of your favorite tubers. Created by Scott Garner , the drum machine is an exploration of the interaction between nature and technology. Read the rest of The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arduino , beetbox , beets , drum machine , pygame , python , raspberry pi , scott garner , sparkfun

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The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables

The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables

December 17, 2012 by  
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Want to throw down some sick underground beats using vegetables that actually grow underground? Get back to your musical roots by jamming on the BeetBox , a simple musical instrument powered by a Raspberry Pi with a capacitive touch sensor, audio amplifier, wooden box, and six of your favorite tubers. Created by Scott Garner , the drum machine is an exploration of the interaction between nature and technology. Read the rest of The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arduino , beetbox , beets , drum machine , pygame , python , raspberry pi , scott garner , sparkfun

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The BeetBox Kicks Out the Jams With the Help of Root Vegetables

Cornell Soothes Stressed Out Students by Installing Grassy Lawn in the Olin Library

December 17, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Cornell Soothes Stressed Out Students by Installing Grassy Lawn in the Olin Library Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cornell university , Cornell University Human Ecology Department , eco design , grass in library , green design , indoor garden , indoor grass , Olin Library , sustainable design

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Cornell Soothes Stressed Out Students by Installing Grassy Lawn in the Olin Library

Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

December 17, 2012 by  
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A Brazilian fast-food chain has introduced a clever solution for customers tired of having to unwrap their hamburger before eating it: edible packaging . As part of a marketing campaign designed to position their burgers as literally irresistible and reduce paper waste headed for the landfill, a restaurant chain called “Bob’s” recently experimented with a burger wrapping made from edible paper.  According to PSFK , the campaign was so successful that not a single customer threw away the wrappings, which meant a lot less trash to haul out to the dumpster. I’m sure you’re wondering exactly what this so-called edible packaging is made from and what it tastes like. Unfortunately, those details are a little hard to find.  Comunicadores  reports that agency NBS created the packaging, and that the specially wrapped burgers were only available in Bob’s restaurants for a limited time. Most edible papers are made from sugar or rice, so its conceivable that those ingredients also come into play with the NBS packaging. As you’ll see in the video it’s possible to apply condiments and stuff the burger in your mouth wrappings and all, so it can’t taste that bad. Although the gastrointestinal wisdom of eating an unwrapped hamburger is questionable, there’s no denying that this type of packaging could be great for the environment. Remember when public pressure forced major fast food chains to abandon Styrofoam boxes for the paper wrap and paperboard boxes used today? While it’s better for the environment, paper packaging still come with a huge carbon footprint and creates mountains of unnecessary waste. Edible packaging is biodegradable and compostable, reducing the amount of litter that must be carted off to the landfill. via DesignTaxi

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Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

HOW TO: Pickle Beets In Just 1 Hour

October 17, 2012 by  
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Beets come in all shapes and sized, from dark red and pink striped to light orange and everything in between . We used a bunch of gorgeous organic Chioggia beets from the farmer’s market. Chioggia beets are recognizable by their distinctive pink and white striped flesh. Unfortunately, the stripes don’t stand out very much after you’ve cooked your beets in preparation for pickling, so if you’re hoping for the bright fuschia color that some pickled beets have, make sure you choose the dark red variety. Here’s what you need to do to start pickling some tasty beets: STEP 1: Gather your ingredients One or more bunches organic beets (6-8 small beets will fill two jelly-jar sized canning jars; double that for a large quart-size jars White vinegar Sugar and salt Cinnamon and cloves Canning jars or clean, sterilized recycled jars (salsa jars work well) STEP TWO: Trim, boil and dice Trim off the leafy beet greens and set them aside – they are a delicious and iron-packed veggie that tastes great sauteed with a little lemon and butter! Drop the beets into a saucepan of water and bring them to a boil. Simmer the beets for about thirty minutes, or until soft all the way through (you can test with the tip of a sharp knife or a fork). Save the beet cooking liquid, which you’ll use to make the pickling liquid. Peel and dice the beets. Once cooled, the peels should come right off in your hands. Dice the beets into wedges or coins, as you prefer. STEP THREE: Prepare the pickling liquid Here is where you’ll need to determine how many jars of beets you want to make. We fit about 6 small beets in a 10-ounce canning jar along with about 2/3 cup of pickling liquid. To make two small jelly-jars of beets, you’ll need about 2/3 cup liquid and about 6-8 beets, and to make a quart size jar, you’ll need 1 cup of liquid and about 14-16 small beets (adjust accordingly depending on the size of the beets you have). Now that you know how much pickling liquid to prepare, all you need to know is that the ratio of beet cooking liquid to white vinegar is 1:1 (so for a quart jar, you’ll measure out 1/2 cup of the beet cooking liquid and add another 1/2 cup of white vinegar). In a bowl, measure out your white vinegar and warm beet cooking liquid that you saved earlier. Add in 1 tablespoon sugar and 1/2 teaspoon salt per half cup of liquid. Add a few cloves, and either a cinnamon stick or a 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon to the mix. Stir the liquid until the salt and sugar have dissolved. STEP FOUR: Jar the beets Jar the beets and pour the pickling liquid right up to the very lip of the jar, making sure to cover the beets completely. Place a piece of parchment paper over the beets and screw on the lid. Pop them into the fridge and wait three days so you can do your first taste-test! Here are some fun additions and variations you can try: Have dark red beets? Add thinly sliced rings of onion to add a spicy flavor and score some hot-pink onions to boot. Add more sugar and less salt for a sweeter beet that tastes great with cheese and in salads. Add fresh ginger slices for a spice-infused pickled beet that works well with Asian-inspired dishes .

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HOW TO: Pickle Beets In Just 1 Hour

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