IKEA offers open-source design for Bee Homes

June 5, 2020 by  
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While nearly everyone has heard of IKEA, you may not be familiar with its design lab, called SPACE10, which is focused on creating sustainable and functional solutions for the evolving challenges of daily life. One of the most recent challenges is colony collapse , an epidemic that threatens up to one-third of the world’s food supply. With this in mind, SPACE10 partnered with design studio Bakken and Bæck and product designer Tanita Klein to develop Bee Home, an open-source beehive anyone can design for free. “I want people to design a dream home for bees that provides the perfect environment for their offspring, while at the same time being incredibly easy to design, assemble and place,” Klein said. “It was important for me that Bee Home is aesthetically pleasing and almost feels like you’ve added a sculpture to your garden or your balcony. This project really exemplifies how design can do good for both people and their environment.” Related: This recycled plastic beehive is designed for happy bees The process is easy and fun. Simply visit the Bee Home website to review the options. Select the size, height and style that appeals to you and fits best for your yard, garden or patio. With the parameters chosen, download the design files. Then use the files to build your Bee Home or source someone locally who can do the work for you. The website also provides a list of makerspaces to help you find one in your area. Once your Bee Home is constructed, place it in your desired location and plant flowers nearby to attract bees. Bee Home is intended for solitary bees . Solitary bees are super workers; a single bee can pollinate as much as what 120 honeybees typically pollinate. Each female is a queen, who produces around 20-30 offspring, and several queens can share a Bee Home, potentially resulting in hundreds of solitary bees. “To reconnect with the many bees in our environment, we need to give back what we have taken from them: their homes,” said Myles Palmer, project lead for Bakken and Bæck. “By designing new interactive experiences, we can create a more sustainable manufacturing process for doing so: one that is truly open-sourced, informed by local living and customizable for many contexts and uses.” The homes are simple to design, build , place and maintain. Once in place, leave your Bee Home alone to provide a safe environment for its inhabitants. Once every three years, clean your Bee Home. Otherwise, enjoy the visual appeal of your free design. The planet will thank you. “For almost 80 years, IKEA has enabled people to create a better everyday life at home. But our home is more than just four walls — our home is also the planet we live on,” said Kaave Pour, director of SPACE10. “That is why we launch Bee Home: we want to enable people everywhere to help rebalance our relationship with the planet and ensure a sustainable home for all of us.” + Bee Home + SPACE10 Images via SPACE10

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IKEA offers open-source design for Bee Homes

Urban Beehive Project creates a buzz around honeybee education

January 29, 2020 by  
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In Charlottetown, Canada, a delightful buzz of eco-friendly activity has descended on a new public destination — the Urban Beehive Project, a community installation that highlights the importance of pollinators and their role in a sustainable ecosystem. Local architecture and multidisciplinary firm Nine Yards Studio designed the sculptural community project to not only provide habitat for local bees but also to serve as a platform for hands-on learning and play. Located at Charlottetown’s largest urban garden, the PEI Farm Center, the Urban Beehive Project draws the eye with its two free-standing geometric structures that house demonstration beehives. Each structure is punctuated with two windows — one at child height and the other for adults — to provide glimpses of the bees working inside the plexiglass hive. Visitors can also watch the bees exit and enter the hive at the bee landing pad; a door provides beekeepers access to the hives. The raised installations are built from timber and secured in place by helical anchors to minimize site impact. Related: SCAD students fight food insecurity in Georgia with organic farming and beekeeping “Plan Bee” of the Urban Beehive Project is a three-tiered, 30-foot-by-15-foot amphitheater also built from a series of wooden 3-foot hexagonal blocks. The honeycomb-inspired hexagon blocks are stacked to create seating for small groups on all sides. At the back of the amphitheater is a series of upright hexagonal elements — some with attached graphic interpretation signage about the bees — that rise up to 9 feet above the platform and are large enough for children to sit in. Grass berms surround the structure to provide an extra play element for children. “The Urban Beehive Project has created a dynamic and multifunctional apiary destination in Charlottetown,” the architects explained in a statement. “The project has become a play structure, a sculpture, a garden as well as a tool for hands-on learning. More importantly for us, it has become an example of how design can play an important role in our community, our development and our environment.” + Nine Yards Studio Photography by Tamzin Gillis via Nine Yards Studio

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Urban Beehive Project creates a buzz around honeybee education

MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees

November 5, 2018 by  
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We’re big fans of beautifully designed urban beehives on Inhabitat, and Mexico-based design studio MaliArts’ new shelters for solitary bees are just as buzz-worthy. Dubbed ‘Refugio,’ the project currently consists of three distinct and sculptural beehives aimed at attracting different species of solitary bees. Built with natural materials, each shelter offers a resting place and access to food and water for the insects. When most of us think about bees, it’s the sociable honey bees and bumblebees that first spring to mind. However, the solitary bees — which, as the name suggests, are lone bees that don’t belong to any colony — make up most of the bee species around the world. Though they’re less popularly known because they typically produce neither honey nor beeswax (and have a weak or nonexistent sting), solitary bees are powerful pollinators and have important roles to play in our food system. “When we talk about bees, we usually imagine the European honey bee ( Apis mellifera ) when in reality, around 90 percent of the bee species are considered solitary,” Gabriel Calvillo of MaliArts told  Dezeen . “The fact that solitary bees do not generate any ‘consumable product’ for humans has meant that they are not given much attention, but recent studies point to the fact that they are possibly the most efficient pollinators in nature.” Related: 6 buzz-worthy backyard beehive designs To bring attention to these bees and create habitats for the endangered insects, MaliArts created three Refugio structures each tailored to the different nesting and refuge preferences of solitary bees. Stylish enough for a wide range of urban settings, each bee hotel is built of  pine  and teak wood finished with natural oil, a ceramic roof or body and steel legs. Feeders and waterers are integrated into the design. Each shelter will also be accompanied by explanatory reading material for passersby. + MaliArts Via Dezeen Images via MaliArts

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MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees

A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

November 5, 2018 by  
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This incredibly charming Spanish bungalow in San Jose, California might have been built in 1928, but the 759-square-foot home has been retrofitted with some seriously high-tech features to convert it into a modern, energy-efficient powerhouse. While retaining some of its original features, the home was upgraded with rooftop solar panels and an electric vehicle charging port. Best of all, this bungalow just went on the market, meaning all of this energy-efficient cuteness can be yours for  $798,000 . Located on a corner lot with a large backyard, the two bedroom, one bath Spanish bungalow is a beautiful space with lots of character. The interior is bright and airy, with high ceilings and plenty of windows. To give the home a modern makeover, the interior and exterior were repainted and new tiles floors were installed in the kitchen and bathroom. Although the renovation process was focused on modernizing the living space, the home’s original wood floors, stained glass windows and wood-burning fireplace were retained. Related: An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension To create an energy-efficient space , the home was retrofitted with several modern amenities. The roof is home to new solar panels, and there is a charging port for electric vehicles. The backyard was also given a resilient makeover with drought-tolerant landscaping and mature trees. The calming outdoor area will allow the new homeowners to enjoy a brand new hot tub, which sits next to a serene seating area covered by a pergola. The charismatic  cottage is within walking distance from downtown San Jose and historic Japantown, where the new homeowners can enjoy the many shops, markets and eateries. The home is also just one mile from the proposed BART Station slated to open in the near future. + Coldwell Banker Photography by f8 Media via Coldwell Banker  

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A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

16 green holiday gifts for gardeners and backyard farmers

December 5, 2017 by  
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Gardening, backyard farming, and homesteading have become more popular than ever, and chances are you have at least one green thumb to shop for this holiday season. From monthly seed subscription boxes to eco-friendly gardening tools , terrarium kits , and even backyard beehive s, we’ve rounded up some fabulous gift ideas for plant lovers of all ages and abilities. Check out what we’ve found in this year’s Green Holiday Gift Guide! GIFTS FOR THE GREEN THUMB >

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16 green holiday gifts for gardeners and backyard farmers

Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

June 17, 2016 by  
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First installed at the world expo last spring, the multi-award-winning Hive was disassembled at the end of the event and moved to the Kew Gardens, where it was reassembled as the UK’s first-ever rebuilt Expo pavilion. Its lattice-like design was inspired by the lifespan of the honeybee and “highlights the important role of bees and other pollinators in feeding the planet,” says Stage One. The complex structure comprises nearly 170,000 parts assembled in 32 horizontal layers with hexagonal cells for a metal honeycomb effect. Each piece was etched with a reference number to make reassembly a possibility. Related: Wolfgang Buttress-Led Team Wins Bid to Design 2015 UK Milan Expo Pavilion More than just an elaborate artwork, the Hive serves an educational purpose and guides visitors through a multi-sensory experience simulating a real beehive . An array of almost 1,000 LEDs line the Hive’s internal void and are complemented with orchestral sound recordings. Sensors that monitor activity within a real beehive at Kew control the light and sound intensity. The Hive will stay at the London gardens until the end of 2017. + Wolfgang Buttress + Stage One Via Dezeen Images via Stage One

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Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

June 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

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First installed at the world expo last spring, the multi-award-winning Hive was disassembled at the end of the event and moved to the Kew Gardens, where it was reassembled as the UK’s first-ever rebuilt Expo pavilion. Its lattice-like design was inspired by the lifespan of the honeybee and “highlights the important role of bees and other pollinators in feeding the planet,” says Stage One. The complex structure comprises nearly 170,000 parts assembled in 32 horizontal layers with hexagonal cells for a metal honeycomb effect. Each piece was etched with a reference number to make reassembly a possibility. Related: Wolfgang Buttress-Led Team Wins Bid to Design 2015 UK Milan Expo Pavilion More than just an elaborate artwork, the Hive serves an educational purpose and guides visitors through a multi-sensory experience simulating a real beehive . An array of almost 1,000 LEDs line the Hive’s internal void and are complemented with orchestral sound recordings. Sensors that monitor activity within a real beehive at Kew control the light and sound intensity. The Hive will stay at the London gardens until the end of 2017. + Wolfgang Buttress + Stage One Via Dezeen Images via Stage One

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Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand

February 23, 2015 by  
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We know that honeybees are having a rough time , so we’re very excited to hear about Flow Hive —a new honey collection and extraction system that allows beekeepers to easily harvest honey from their hives by quite literally having it on tap. The result of 10 years of careful research and design from Australian father and son duo Stuart and Cedar Anderson, the Flow system replaces regular frames in standard beehives and means beekeepers can ‘rob’ their hives without having to open them, disturb the bees or risk being stung. The Flow Hive blew its Indiegogo campaign out of the water on its first day, receiving more than $1 million in pledges. Click through to read more about the design that could revolutionize beekeeping and that makes it so much easier for backyard beekeepers to do their bit to help honeybees and their vital pollination work . Read the rest of Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , apiculture , beehive , beekeeping , bees , colony collapse disorder , Flow Frames , Flow Hive , Gardening , honey , honey extraction , honey extraction without disturbing bees , Honey Flow , honey on tap , insects , pollinators , urban beekeeping

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Flow Hive: New crowdsourced project lets beekeepers harvest honey on demand

Peter Kogler’s spectacular graphic illusions take visitors into a dizzying swirling vortex

February 23, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Peter Kogler’s spectacular graphic illusions take visitors into a dizzying swirling vortex Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2D into 3D , computer-generated art , digital art , Franz Pomassl , Peter Kogler , spectacular illusions , Street art , swirling vortex , Viennese art

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Peter Kogler’s spectacular graphic illusions take visitors into a dizzying swirling vortex

18 Green Gifts for the Home

November 30, 2014 by  
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  A house becomes a home when it’s filled with the energy of those who live there, and the houseware items  we’ve put together for this year’s gift guide can help make a home as luminous and eco-friendly as possible. Recycled glass tumblers, sustainable bamboo bowls, and the cutest little hedgehog dryer buddies ever are just a few of the gems  we’ve found that can help make this holiday the greenest yet. GREEN ECO-GIFTS FOR THE HOME > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adjust-a-bowl , apartment laundry machine , apiary , bamboo bowls , bamboo cutting board , bamboo toothbrushes , bee hive , beehive , bowl , bowl covers , bowls , candle , candles , castile soap , compost , compost pail , cork , Cork Bowl , cotton bowl covers , cotton paper towels , countertop compost pail , cutting board , Dr. Bronners , dryer hedgehogs , eco candle , eco christmas , eco friendly presents , eco holiday , eco soy candle , eco xmas , eco-friendly gifts , eco-friendly gifts for the home , environmentally friendly gifts , environmentally friendly presents , gifts for the home , green christmas , green gift guide , green holiday , green holidaygift guide , green presents , green xmas , guest toothbrush , hedgehogs , hemp produce bags , home gifts , home presents , household gifts , household presents , Kikkerland , laundry pod , map coasters , neighbourhoods , organic cotton , produce bags , recycled glass , recycled glasses , soy candles , stainless steel straws , steel straws , straws , throw blankets , Williams-Sonoma

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18 Green Gifts for the Home

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