MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees

November 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees

We’re big fans of beautifully designed urban beehives on Inhabitat, and Mexico-based design studio MaliArts’ new shelters for solitary bees are just as buzz-worthy. Dubbed ‘Refugio,’ the project currently consists of three distinct and sculptural beehives aimed at attracting different species of solitary bees. Built with natural materials, each shelter offers a resting place and access to food and water for the insects. When most of us think about bees, it’s the sociable honey bees and bumblebees that first spring to mind. However, the solitary bees — which, as the name suggests, are lone bees that don’t belong to any colony — make up most of the bee species around the world. Though they’re less popularly known because they typically produce neither honey nor beeswax (and have a weak or nonexistent sting), solitary bees are powerful pollinators and have important roles to play in our food system. “When we talk about bees, we usually imagine the European honey bee ( Apis mellifera ) when in reality, around 90 percent of the bee species are considered solitary,” Gabriel Calvillo of MaliArts told  Dezeen . “The fact that solitary bees do not generate any ‘consumable product’ for humans has meant that they are not given much attention, but recent studies point to the fact that they are possibly the most efficient pollinators in nature.” Related: 6 buzz-worthy backyard beehive designs To bring attention to these bees and create habitats for the endangered insects, MaliArts created three Refugio structures each tailored to the different nesting and refuge preferences of solitary bees. Stylish enough for a wide range of urban settings, each bee hotel is built of  pine  and teak wood finished with natural oil, a ceramic roof or body and steel legs. Feeders and waterers are integrated into the design. Each shelter will also be accompanied by explanatory reading material for passersby. + MaliArts Via Dezeen Images via MaliArts

More:
MaliArts designs city-chic beehives to save solitary bees

A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

November 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

This incredibly charming Spanish bungalow in San Jose, California might have been built in 1928, but the 759-square-foot home has been retrofitted with some seriously high-tech features to convert it into a modern, energy-efficient powerhouse. While retaining some of its original features, the home was upgraded with rooftop solar panels and an electric vehicle charging port. Best of all, this bungalow just went on the market, meaning all of this energy-efficient cuteness can be yours for  $798,000 . Located on a corner lot with a large backyard, the two bedroom, one bath Spanish bungalow is a beautiful space with lots of character. The interior is bright and airy, with high ceilings and plenty of windows. To give the home a modern makeover, the interior and exterior were repainted and new tiles floors were installed in the kitchen and bathroom. Although the renovation process was focused on modernizing the living space, the home’s original wood floors, stained glass windows and wood-burning fireplace were retained. Related: An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension To create an energy-efficient space , the home was retrofitted with several modern amenities. The roof is home to new solar panels, and there is a charging port for electric vehicles. The backyard was also given a resilient makeover with drought-tolerant landscaping and mature trees. The calming outdoor area will allow the new homeowners to enjoy a brand new hot tub, which sits next to a serene seating area covered by a pergola. The charismatic  cottage is within walking distance from downtown San Jose and historic Japantown, where the new homeowners can enjoy the many shops, markets and eateries. The home is also just one mile from the proposed BART Station slated to open in the near future. + Coldwell Banker Photography by f8 Media via Coldwell Banker  

Read the original:
A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

7 bee hotels for our favorite pollinators

November 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 7 bee hotels for our favorite pollinators

Giant K-abeilles Hotel for Bees pavilion by AtelierD offered resting place for bees and humans For the 2012 Muttersholtz Archi Festival, AtelierD designed the K-abeilles Hotel for Bees. Shaped like a huge honeycomb , the wood pavilion was comprised of hexagonal components, some open and some packed with natural materials where bees could nest. Humans could sit inside the pavilion on hexagonal seats, close enough to marvel at and appreciate the bustling bees. Related: Bees placed on the endangered species list for the very first time Tea company Taylors of Harrogate creates The Grand Beedapest Hotel inspired by Wes Anderson UK tea company Taylors of Harrogate , whose blends depend on fruits pollinated by bees, decided to raise awareness about bee population decline with an adorable luxury bee hotel. They teamed up with Kew Gardens to create the Grand Beedapest Hotel , evocative of the magnificent hotel in Wes Anderson’s most recent film. Details like a peppermint leaf swimming pool and lemongrass ginger bar added to the quirky charm of the bee hotel. PopTarts Works designers utilize laser cut, recycled cardboard to make Beehive Hotel for an entire bee colony The designers of PopTarts Works decided to create their Beehive Hotel to help out the bees of Toronto . Using recycled corrugated cardboard , they made a five-foot-high habitat that resembles wild hives. They installed the hotel and bees speedily began to nest inside. The Beehive Hotel has enough room for a whole mason bee colony, whose members can pollinate as much as 2,000 flowers every day. University student Tom Back created Thrive Hive to imitate bees’ natural habitats While a student at Kingston University , Tom Back of Thumb Designs created his Thrive Hive out of straw and wood. The hive design was meant to more closely match natural habitats of bees than box homes do, and woven straw insulation ensured the bees inside would flourish even in severe weather . His concept is one that has potential for urban areas as it could be used on a balcony or in a small backyard. Back showed his design at the London Design Festival . University at Buffalo architecture students get in on the bee-saving action with steel cylindrical Elevator B bee skyscraper When a bee colony was found dwelling in an old grain mill, University at Buffalo architecture students decided to design them a better home. Courtney Creenan, Scott Selin, Lisa Stern, Daniel Nead, and Kyle Mastalinski created Elevator B , a towering 22-foot-tall bee apartment made with steel , cypress, and glass . The bee skyscraper mimics the silos where the bee colony once lived, and is equipped with insulation to offer the bees space to reside in the city even during cold winters. Tomoko Azumi upcycles UK auction house waste catalogues into colorful Bee Hive UK auction house Phillips de Pury & Company asked creatives from around the world to transform waste packaging and catalogs into habitats for bees, bats , or birds. Tomoko Azumi of tna design studio responded by upcycling the papers into a modern, colorful Bee Hive . 13 other architects, designers, and artists also utilized Phillips de Pury & Company waste materials to create funky homes for pollinators, and the auction house sold the creative designs to raise money for Adventure Ecology, founded by David de Rothschild. MIT Media Lab creates controlled Synthetic Apiary to keep bees safe from pesticides, drought, climate change Even MIT is trying to make a difference for bees. The MIT Media Lab and Mediated Matter created the indoor Synthetic Apiary , where researchers can control conditions to keep bees safe year-round from pesticides, drought , and climate change . While they’re still testing the design, they did record the first ever birth of a bee in an artificial environment . Images via ©Stephane Spach, screenshot , PopTarts Works , Thumb Designs , Hive City , Tomoko Azumi , and Mediated Matter/MIT

Read the original post:
7 bee hotels for our favorite pollinators

World’s first streetlights powered by footsteps installed in Las Vegas

November 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on World’s first streetlights powered by footsteps installed in Las Vegas

Originally posted here: 
World’s first streetlights powered by footsteps installed in Las Vegas

Architects Design Luxe Bug Hotels For London Parks

June 8, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architects Design Luxe Bug Hotels For London Parks

Read the rest of Architects Design Luxe Bug Hotels For London Parks http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , arup , bee hotel , bee house , british land , bug architecture , bug hotels , city of london , colony collapse disorder , Design Competition , eco design , green design , insect hotels , London , Sustainable Building

Go here to see the original: 
Architects Design Luxe Bug Hotels For London Parks

British Supermarket Installs Bee Hotels

April 2, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on British Supermarket Installs Bee Hotels

Everyone wants to help save the bees –  even British supermarket chain Sainsbury’s, who will be installing eight bee “hotels” on the land around its Gloucestershire supermarket.

Original post:
British Supermarket Installs Bee Hotels

Bad Behavior has blocked 3518 access attempts in the last 7 days.