Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

April 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

As one of the most beautiful states in the country, Maine offers an infinite number of advantages. But the state’s notoriously frigid winters often leave new residents desperate to find some respite from the long, cold months. After spending a few years in a drafty home where she and her family lived in multiple layers of clothing, author Jessica Kerwin Jenkins and her husband decided to build their own energy-efficient home. The result is an incredible barn-inspired structure that uses solar power and multiple passive features to keep the stunning interior living spaces warm and cozy throughout the year. Once they set out to build a new home, the couple researched passive house concepts that would suit their family’s needs, which included a comfortable living space where they wouldn’t have to dress in 10 layers of warm clothing for six months out of the year. With the help of a local architect, the couple set out to build an extremely airtight structure that used solar power and passive strategies to create an energy-efficient home with a minimal carbon footprint. Related: Beautiful Maine home uses passive solar principles to achieve near net-zero energy Located in the quaint community of Blue Hill, the beautiful home is tucked into an old blueberry field just minutes away from a secluded cove. The incredibly idyllic setting set the tone for the design, which focused on creating something that would fit the region’s style but also reap the benefits of modern sustainability. As for aesthetics, Jenkins explained that she and her husband were both intrigued by the traditional Japanese practice of shou sugi ban . But they ended up cladding the home in something that would pay homage to the local seaside community — pitch tar. Typically used to weatherproof ships’ masts, the material is durable, low-maintenance and highly insulative. Additionally, the jet-black exterior allows the home to both stand out and blend in with its natural surroundings. “We always wanted to do a black house, which seems really dramatic — but there are so many evergreens here that it disappears into the tree line,” Jenkins said. The house is topped with a 26-panel, 7.8 kW solar array on the pitched roof, generating more power than the home uses. The exterior is punctuated with an abundance of triple-paned windows that, thanks to the home’s southern orientation, provide optimal solar gain to keep the interiors warm. At 2,288 square feet, the four-bedroom home is quite spacious. Plentiful windows and high ceilings add to the modern feel of the living spaces. For an extra touch of warmth, the home is equipped with a radiant floor heating and an air exchanger that pulls in air from outside and passes it through a filter. This stunning, eco-friendly home set in an unbelievable location, not far from Acadia National Park, can be all yours for just $585,000 , as it is currently listed for sale. + Christopher Group Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Bruce Frame Photography via Christopher Group

Read more here: 
Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

April 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

As one of the most beautiful states in the country, Maine offers an infinite number of advantages. But the state’s notoriously frigid winters often leave new residents desperate to find some respite from the long, cold months. After spending a few years in a drafty home where she and her family lived in multiple layers of clothing, author Jessica Kerwin Jenkins and her husband decided to build their own energy-efficient home. The result is an incredible barn-inspired structure that uses solar power and multiple passive features to keep the stunning interior living spaces warm and cozy throughout the year. Once they set out to build a new home, the couple researched passive house concepts that would suit their family’s needs, which included a comfortable living space where they wouldn’t have to dress in 10 layers of warm clothing for six months out of the year. With the help of a local architect, the couple set out to build an extremely airtight structure that used solar power and passive strategies to create an energy-efficient home with a minimal carbon footprint. Related: Beautiful Maine home uses passive solar principles to achieve near net-zero energy Located in the quaint community of Blue Hill, the beautiful home is tucked into an old blueberry field just minutes away from a secluded cove. The incredibly idyllic setting set the tone for the design, which focused on creating something that would fit the region’s style but also reap the benefits of modern sustainability. As for aesthetics, Jenkins explained that she and her husband were both intrigued by the traditional Japanese practice of shou sugi ban . But they ended up cladding the home in something that would pay homage to the local seaside community — pitch tar. Typically used to weatherproof ships’ masts, the material is durable, low-maintenance and highly insulative. Additionally, the jet-black exterior allows the home to both stand out and blend in with its natural surroundings. “We always wanted to do a black house, which seems really dramatic — but there are so many evergreens here that it disappears into the tree line,” Jenkins said. The house is topped with a 26-panel, 7.8 kW solar array on the pitched roof, generating more power than the home uses. The exterior is punctuated with an abundance of triple-paned windows that, thanks to the home’s southern orientation, provide optimal solar gain to keep the interiors warm. At 2,288 square feet, the four-bedroom home is quite spacious. Plentiful windows and high ceilings add to the modern feel of the living spaces. For an extra touch of warmth, the home is equipped with a radiant floor heating and an air exchanger that pulls in air from outside and passes it through a filter. This stunning, eco-friendly home set in an unbelievable location, not far from Acadia National Park, can be all yours for just $585,000 , as it is currently listed for sale. + Christopher Group Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Bruce Frame Photography via Christopher Group

View post: 
Solar-powered home in Maine stays warm with passive design

The 10 best tiny homes in California

March 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The 10 best tiny homes in California

If you’re looking for some cool tiny home retreats to try out a more minimalist style of living or just looking for a serene vacation spot, well, California is definitely the place to be. We’ve scoured the beautiful coastal state for some of the best tiny homes in California. Take a look! Gorgeous tiny home thrives in the California sunshine Surf’s up in this gorgeous tiny home, which is designed to be both comfy and mobile. One of Canadian studio  Minimaliste’s most recent tiny home builds, the compact 331-square-foot structure was built to perform just as well in warm climates as it does in colder regions. The interior space, although compact, was strategically laid out to provide optimal space, including a cozy sleeping loft made possible by the home’s slanted roof. Related: 8 tiny homes built tough for off-grid living Converted school bus in Malibu Creek State Park This gorgeous glamping retreat is located near Malibu Creek State Park and promises incredible mountain views. The interior is spacious and sleeps up to four people comfortably. Although you’ll most likely enjoy this cozy interior, the outdoor space is what makes this skoolie so special. An open-air deck with ample seating and dining space is a wonderful area to take in the views over breakfast, lunch and dinner. The nearby hammock is a prime napping spot. Young couple build tiny home to avoid sky-high Bay Area housing prices It’s well-known that California’s Bay Area is one of the country’s — and the world’s — most expensive places to live. However, its also an idyllic area to put down roots, or wheels for that matter. When Nicolette and Michael decided to live in the Bay Area so that Michael could stay in college, they had an impossible time finding proper housing. Frustrated at price of housing, the ambitious couple decided to just build their own tiny home . The result is a stunning, 300-square-foot home on wheels that comes with a full kitchen, sleeping loft and even a reading nook. Off-grid eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool Californian vibes Another creation by Canada-based  Minimaliste Houses , the Eucalptus tiny home is a sight to behold. Built for a client who wanted to explore the California coast, the beautiful tiny home on wheels is optimized for off-grid fun. Besides its modern design, the 28-foot-long home is equipped with roof-top solar panels , tight thermal insulation and natural light, all of which contribute to the home’s self-sustenance. Try out tiny home living in San Francisco’s ‘Pavilion’ This tiny home retreat is a perfect place to enjoy the beautiful city of San Francisco. The Airbnb property is just 450 square feet, but its charming cottage-style design, made up of several recycled and repurposed materials , makes it feel so much bigger. The retreat sleeps up to two guests, who can make use of its many amenities such as a light-filled, glass-enclosed living space surrounded by a serene garden with a pond. Relax in this retreat with a hot tub in San Francisco If you’re looking for a tiny home experience in California that is guaranteed to bring a little tranquility to your life, check out this retreat in San Francisco. Located in a spacious backyard of the owner’s home, the minuscule studio sleeps two guests comfortably in its shed-like space. The interior is compact, with just one room fitting in the bedroom, living room, kitchen and bathroom. But, the biggest draw to this retreat is its outdoor space. The home is surrounded by an open-air hardwood deck with a two-person hot tub. Built around a 700-year-old redwood tree that offers as much of a romantic touch as it does shade, the rental also boasts an outdoor shower, where you can bathe under the stars. The ‘Nugget’ in Costa Mesa takes tiny home living back to basics Located just a 10-minute drive to the beach, this beautiful tiny home in Costa Mesa is the perfect place to recharge your batteries. Although it is just 140 square feet, the retreat sleeps up to two guests comfortably. With its large sliding glass door entryway, the home boasts a minimalist feel that makes it just as perfect for a business trip as it does for a relaxing stay at the beach. A private deck wraps around the home and is shaded by bamboo trees. Tiny home getaway near San Diego These days, many travelers are forgoing the excessive displays of luxury in fancy hotels for simpler getaways. Tiny home retreats, like this gorgeous cabin-inspired tiny home near San Diego, offer guests a chance to relax and reconnect with nature. Located near beautiful Mount Laguna, the tiny home sleeps up to four people between a double bed and two sofa beds. Although the living space is more than sufficient, it is the outdoor area that is so special. The glamping retreat is completely immersed in nature, and features a rooftop terrace for guests to take in a bit of stargazing before enjoying a toasty nightcap around the private fire pit. Vintage glamping travel trailer in San Fernando Valley If there’s one iconic image that encompasses California adventure, it’s the gleaming vintage travel trailer, like this 1954 trailer just outside of Los Angeles. The trailer itself sleeps up to four and has a lovely interior. The magic really begins with the outdoor space, which features a covered deck with a romantic canopied double bed, perfect for sleeping under the stars during the long summer months. Additionally, guests can enjoy the incredible views of the San Fernando Valley from the adjacent outdoor lounge space. Off-grid tiny home in southern California Sometimes, you just need to get away from the hustle and bustle. For those times, this off-grid tiny home in Southern California will do the trick. The compact studio is outfitted with a plush, queen-sized bed. The space is tiny, but as an extra bonus, the home features a custom, garage door-style window that can be fully opened to enjoy amazing views of the 20 acres of beautiful private land that surround the tiny home retreat. Images via Minimaliste, Airbnb and Glamping Hub

Read the rest here:
The 10 best tiny homes in California

Aquascaping for Beginners: 11 Beautiful Aquatic Plants

July 31, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Aquascaping for Beginners: 11 Beautiful Aquatic Plants

It’s a well-known fact that immersing yourself in nature can … The post Aquascaping for Beginners: 11 Beautiful Aquatic Plants appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Aquascaping for Beginners: 11 Beautiful Aquatic Plants

Disconnect in this serene tiny home tucked into a coastal sheep farm in New Zealand

February 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Disconnect in this serene tiny home tucked into a coastal sheep farm in New Zealand

Tiny homes around the world offer guests stunning views and relaxing atmospheres, but this studio-style tiny retreat in New Zealand is right up the alley for anyone looking to reconnect with nature. Located in Akara, South Island, the compact, pitched-roof cabin has a floor-to-ceiling glass wall to provide stunning views of the rolling green landscape that leads out to the sea. If that’s not enough, the open-air front patio features a large cedar hot tub for watching the sun go down after a nice day of surfing in the bay. Located just 30 minutes from Akara, South Island, this charming tiny cottage is tucked into a coastal sheep farm just steps away from beautiful Little Akaloa Bay. To get to the property, guests must make their way on a five-minute stroll through scenic native bush. Nestled into the tall trees and rolling green landscape, the tiny home is a welcoming beacon. Related: This geometric cabin in Slovenia is a perfect romantic getaway for nature-lovers The tiny studio sleeps just two people, with a double-sized bed that folds up when not in use. There is a small kitchenette and bathroom. The home is kept warm and toasty during the chilly months thanks to a wood-burning stove. The massive, floor-to-ceiling glass wall looks out from the interior, providing stunning, unobstructed views all day long. Of course, at the heart of the retreat is the outdoor space, which includes an open-air deck. There’s a barbecue grill and small dinette set for meals, as well as plenty of seating and a hammock for just taking in the views. However, the best place to relax in and around the tiny cabin is definitely the round cedar hot tub. The picturesque area is the perfect spot for hikers and outdoor enthusiasts or those simply wanting a respite from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Guests will be able to enjoy the beautiful remote bays that surround the beautiful property by renting the surfboards, paddle boards and fishing equipment available. + Glamping Hub Tiny Home Rental Via Tiny House Talk Images via Glamping Hub  

Original post:
Disconnect in this serene tiny home tucked into a coastal sheep farm in New Zealand

Post-war home in Kyoto brilliantly renovated to blend modernity with tradition

November 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Post-war home in Kyoto brilliantly renovated to blend modernity with tradition

Japanese architecture is known for its minimalist sophistication and this beautiful renovation of a pre-war home in Kyoto is a shining example. Designed by Osaka-based firm, atelier Luke , the renovation process of the Ichijoji House included exposing the beautiful timber beams that were once concealed and conferring with local craftspeople to create design elements that pay homage to the traditional Kyoto vernacular. The home was originally built in 1961, but had become rundown over the years. A Danish-Australian furniture maker purchased the home to convert into a modern living space while maintaining its traditional character. Related: This nomadic origami teahouse is made of hundreds of sheets of folded paper Due to the poor state of the home, the first step was gutting the space while trying to retain the original timber structure. During the renovation process, the team found that many of home’s structural timber elements, such as the large cambered roof beams , had been hidden from sight. The decision was made to leave the beams exposed in order to create a series of wooden sculptural forms that enhance the home’s neutral, minimalist design. To make better use of the space, the layout of the home was reversed from the original layout. The first floor would now house the private spaces while the living area was installed upstairs, reached by a timber ladder. What was once the ground floor kitchen was converted into a beautiful traditional Japanese bedroom, complete with tatami mats , shoji screens, and handmade wallpaper. An extension was added to back of the home in order to make room for indoor plumbing system for the new bathroom and kitchen. The space was also built out to create a peaceful screened-in courtyard reached through a series of sliding timber doors and paper screens. As for the interior design , the design team went to local craftspeople from Kyoto, as well as Osaka and Nagano to create a traditional atmosphere. Most of the decorative or functional elements such as the stained wallpaper, lacquered flooring, and timber joinery were either hand crafted or finished using traditional techniques. Bespoke furniture pieces including various cabinets and the “floating” dining table were made out of Japanese oak. + atelier Luke Images via atelier Luke

Read the original post:
Post-war home in Kyoto brilliantly renovated to blend modernity with tradition

5 Responsible Tourism Tips

September 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 5 Responsible Tourism Tips

When we travel, our most memorable moments are of the beautiful places we see and the people we interact with. But have we made those people’s lives better by visiting them? Did our visit have a positive impact? Socially and environmentally…

Read more from the original source:
5 Responsible Tourism Tips

Adidas x Parley host giveaway for 3D-printed sneakers made from recycled ocean plastic

June 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Adidas x Parley host giveaway for 3D-printed sneakers made from recycled ocean plastic

If you’ve ever wanted to get your hands on a 3D-printed shoe, here’s your chance. In honor of World Oceans Day , Adidas and Parley for the Oceans are giving away 50 free pairs of their beautiful 3D-printed running shoes made almost entirely of recycled ocean plastic. Around 16.5 post-consumer plastic bottles and 13 grams of gill-net plastic were used in the production of every sneaker. Read on to learn how you can enter.

Original post:
Adidas x Parley host giveaway for 3D-printed sneakers made from recycled ocean plastic

The mysterious phenomenon of “hair ice” finally solved by scientists

August 13, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The mysterious phenomenon of “hair ice” finally solved by scientists

For nearly a century, scientists have been baffled by the phenomenon known as hair ice – hair-like ice formations found in the forest during certain times of the year. Now, scientists have discovered that the answer to the mystery may be found in the humble fungus. Though most of us don’t realize it, fungi are pretty incredible organisms. The majority of carbon sequestration in northern forests is facilitated by fungi , clean-burning biofuel can be created by fungi, and fungi can be used to remove toxins such as BPA out of the environment.  Not impressed? Fungi also play an essential role in building the environment, as scientists recently determined after finding that the beautiful and rare “hair ice” are the handy work of fungi. Read the rest of The mysterious phenomenon of “hair ice” finally solved by scientists

Originally posted here:
The mysterious phenomenon of “hair ice” finally solved by scientists

INFOGRAPHIC: Learn the history behind modernist design

July 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on INFOGRAPHIC: Learn the history behind modernist design

Have you ever wondered where all the beautiful modernist buildings featured on Inhabitat got their roots? London’s modern furniture store ARAM sheds light on the history of modernist design with an infographic. The visual explores multiple aspects of Modernism, from its key principles and art movements to the important figures like Le Corbusier . Understanding how Modernism evolved from a philosophical movement and into the art and architecture spheres is critical to appreciating its legacy. Read on to learn more. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: Learn the history behind modernist design

More here: 
INFOGRAPHIC: Learn the history behind modernist design

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 21449 access attempts in the last 7 days.