Black bear cub in Oregon euthanized after too much human contact

June 20, 2019 by  
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After months of eating trail mix and making human friends, a black bear cub had to be euthanized in Oregon. According to state officials, the unfortunate incident is a reminder to tourists and locals that bears and all wildlife should never be fed or engaged with. Visitors at a boat launch on Hagg Lake frequently saw the bear cub, and many continued to leave food and take photos with the bear. After the Washington County Sheriff’s Office received numerous calls about bear cub sightings and noticed circulating social media photos of “selfies” with the bear cub, they investigated the sightings and set out a trap. Deputies are working to get this bear cub near Hagg Lake to go back into the woods… please stay away from the area near Boat Ramp A. pic.twitter.com/tI8m5yTbyk — WCSO Oregon (@WCSOOregon) June 13, 2019 The state officials eventually caught the bear cub with the intention of releasing him farther into the forest , away from busy roads and popular family recreation sites. However, upon realizing that the bear was not fearful when they approached and instead had become very comfortable around humans, the officials reported that they had no choice but to euthanize the cub. Related: Seven commandments of leave no trace camping “This is a classic example of why we implore members of the public not to feed bears,” wildlife biologist Kurt Licence said in a statement. “While the individuals who put food out for this bear may have had good intentions, bears should never, ever be fed.” According to Oregon state law, it is illegal to scatter food to attract or lure wildlife . The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife explained that miscellaneous food can not only make bears sick, it can also cause them to become habituated to human interaction. This dependency and comfort opens the door for dangerous encounters, especially when the bears become older and larger. Many people expressed outrage upon hearing news of the killing; however, most understood that the state officials had no choice and that the situation could have been avoided by those who fed the bear. “They got the bear killed and that’s not OK,” local resident and frequent visitor to Hagg Lake Jennifer Harrison told the local news . “They tried to do something they thought was a good thing, but it ended up getting the bear killed, so please do not feed the bears.” Rangers guessed that the bear cub was approximately 3 years old. Via Huffington Post Image via Keaton

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Black bear cub in Oregon euthanized after too much human contact

Experimental timber prototype champions sustainable modular housing for the masses

June 20, 2019 by  
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Mexico City-based architectural firm Dellekamp Schleich designed a modular timber home as an inspiring prototype for affordable and eco-friendly housing in Mexico. Originally created as one of 84 experimental proposals for the 2017 “From the Territory to the Dweller” showcase in Morelos, Dellekamp Schleich’s housing prototype is currently on show at INFONAVIT’s Laboratorio de Vivienda (Housing Laboratory) in Apan. The Laboratorio de Vivienda is an exhibition of 32 housing prototypes that sensitively rethinks low-income dwellings in Mexico. Created for self-construction, the low-cost housing prototype was built with a modular system of timber parts. Both the “From the Territory to the Dweller” program and the Laboratorio de Vivienda exhibition are initiatives of Research Center for Sustainable Development, INFONAVIT, which invited national and international architecture firms to prototype affordable housing for different areas in Mexico. Related: Tatiana Bilbao’s $8,000 house could help solve Mexico’s social housing shortage At “From the Territory to the Dweller,” Dellekamp Schleich was asked to design a housing prototype for Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro, a small village in the Mexican state of Michoacán. The site-specific house is based on the local vernacular styles of the village. Because the timber industry is a major part of the town, Dellekamp Schleich’s housing prototype is built primarily of readily available pine and features construction techniques and styles traditional to that area. Built atop a raised foundation, the modular housing prototype is lined with unfinished wood inside and out. The building is topped with a gable roof painted red and hemmed in by a small fenced-in yard. Operable folding doors open up to a small deck and yard to expand the living areas to the outdoors. Inside, the interiors are dressed with timber furnishings and bathed in natural light from large windows. A compact living area occupies the ground floor, while the bedroom is located in a lofted area. In Laboratorio de Vivienda, Dellekamp Schleich’s housing prototype is one of 32 dwellings that incorporate traditional and locally sourced materials as well as concepts of scalability. The housing prototypes are located within a master plan designed by New York-based MOS Architects and include a Dellekamp Schleich-designed Materials Laboratory as well as a MOS Architects-designed Welcome Center. The exhibition is on show in Apan until June 23, 2019. + Dellekamp Schleich Photography by Jaime Navarro via Dellekamp Schleich

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Experimental timber prototype champions sustainable modular housing for the masses

Arctic permafrost already thawing at a rate not expected until 2090

June 20, 2019 by  
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Frozen ground — called permafrost — is thawing in the Arctic up to 70 years earlier than scientists originally predicted. The thawed landscapes were discovered during an expedition trip by a team of researchers from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The rock and soil in this area has been frozen for thousands of years, but a string of unusually warm summers was enough to drastically alter the temperature and ecosystem. “What we saw was amazing. It’s an indication that the climate is now warmer than at any time in the last 5,000 or more years,” University professor Vladimir Romanovsky told Reuters . The scientists used a small propeller plane to collect data in the far reaches of the Canadian Arctic . Some locations are so remote that the closest human settlement is up to 186 miles away. To their amazement, the landscape looked remarkably different than it had the last time they flew over 10 years ago during a baseline data collection mission. Related: NASA finds cavity the size of Manhattan underneath Antarctic glacier Instead of frozen ground and solid ice, the team saw depressions in the ground indicating thawing and sinking, and ponds where ice had melted, called thermokarst. They also saw vegetation in these areas, which is highly unusual for such a frozen place. The thawing of the permafrost is not only alarming because of the changes to ecosystems; the ice in these areas also contains large quantities of greenhouse gases. As the ice melts, the gases are released into the atmosphere and contribute to the climate crisis . According to the researchers findings, published on June 10 in Geophysical Research Letters , the amount of gases released could undo progress to curb emissions through the Paris Agreement . Jennifer Morgan from Greenpeace International told The Guardian, “ Thawing permafrost is one of the tipping points for climate breakdown, and it’s happening before our very eyes. This premature thawing is another clear signal that we must decarbonize our economies, and immediately.” Via The Guardian and Reuters Image via Bureau of Land Management

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Arctic permafrost already thawing at a rate not expected until 2090

Polar bears could go extinct sooner than scientists previously thought

February 5, 2018 by  
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We’ve long known climate change will cause trouble for polar bears in the wild, but a new study reveals their metabolic rates are higher than we thought, and a changing environment is making it harder for them to snare enough food to satisfy energy needs. As they struggle to find prey, The Guardian reported they could go extinct faster than scientists previously feared. A team of scientists led by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center and the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) studied nine polar bears over three years during a time period in April, in the Beaufort Sea near Alaska . They discovered the bears required three juveniles or one adult ringed seal every 10 days. But five of the nine polar bears didn’t reach that goal during the study, and their body weight plummeted as a result – up to around 44 pounds, during one study period of 10 days. Related: Video of starving polar bear ‘rips your heart out of your chest’ USGS biologist Anthony Pagano told The Guardian, “We found a feast and famine lifestyle – if they missed out on seals it had a pretty dramatic effect on them. We were surprised to see such big changes in body masses, at a time when they should be putting on bulk to sustain them during the year. This and other studies suggest that polar bears aren’t able to meet their bodily demands like they once were.” Metabolic rates the scientists measured in the field averaged over 50 percent higher than previous studies predicted. Combined with other studies on drops in the numbers of polar bears recently, and their body condition, scientists say this new study, published this month in Science , reveals the bears are in a worse plight than we thought. The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average, per The Guardian. Polar bears hunt for prey on sea ice , but as that ice diminishes, many polar bears must resort to foraging for food on land – like in garbage bins of remote towns, according to The Guardian. + University of California, Santa Cruz + Science Via The Guardian Images via Jessica K. Robertson, U.S. Geological Survey and Anthony M. Pagano, USGS

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Polar bears could go extinct sooner than scientists previously thought

UK’s first polar bear cub in 25 years born in Scotland

January 3, 2018 by  
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25 years have passed since a polar bear was born in Britain – but the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) just announced some exciting news. The United Kingdom’s only female polar bear Victoria recently gave birth to a cub at Highland Wildlife Park in Scotland. And it’s possible there could be more than one – Head Keeper for carnivores Una Richardson said in a statement , “We first heard promising noises in the week before Christmas and these have now continued into the new year. Because we don’t have sight inside her cubbing box we can’t be sure if Victoria has had more than one cub but we can confirm the birth.” The UK has at least one new animal resident: a baby polar bear! Highland Wildlife Park staff started hearing what the society described as distinct high-pitched sounds from the maternity den, and have now confirmed at least one cub was indeed born. You can listen to the pretty adorable noises in the park’s video below: Related: Watch a little polar bear cub experience snow for the first time RZSS’s statement did caution the first three months are dangerous for the cubs, whether they’re born in captivity or in the wild . The babies are born blind and don’t weigh much more than a guinea pig, so they’re completely dependent on the mother polar bear. Richardson said, “While we are absolutely thrilled, we are not celebrating prematurely as polar bear cubs have a high mortality rate in the first weeks of life due to their undeveloped immune system and the mother’s exaggerated need for privacy, with any disturbance risking the cub being killed or abandoned.” Naturally the park is taking steps to give the baby or babies a chance. Richardson said they’re monitoring Victoria, and her enclosure is closed to the public. Keeper activity will be kept to a minimum too. If all goes well, visitors might be able to glimpse the cub (or cubs) around March. + Royal Zoological Society of Scotland Images via Highland Wildlife Park on Twitter and BIAZA on Twitter

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UK’s first polar bear cub in 25 years born in Scotland

Climate change is squishing the Earth and making oceans heavier

January 3, 2018 by  
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The ocean floor may be sinking under the weight of heavier oceans as a result of climate-change -induced glacier melting and sea level rise, according to a new study. Scientists at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands discovered that the deforming impact of a heavier ocean on the seafloor is too large to be accurately measured using traditional satellite altimeters. This means that measurements of sea level rise based on the assumption of a static seafloor may be inaccurate. Researchers suspected that traditional sea level measurement methods might be off. “We have had tide gauge sea level rise measurements for more than a century,” Delft University of Technology geoscientist and study Thomas Frederikse told Earther . “You put an instrument at the sea bottom and see how far sea level changes relative to the bottom. Satellites orbiting the Earth measure sea level from space . We wanted to see how large is the difference.” After modeling and analysis of new data, the team determined that, as a result of sea level rise and climate change, the ocean floor had been sinking on average by about 0.1 mm/year between 1993-2014, or 2.1 mm in total. This relatively small change can have a big impact on the accuracy, or inaccuracy, of sea level measurements if not taken into account. Related: Scientists find the Earth’s constant hum is coming from the ocean floor In their study recently published in Geophysical Research Letters , researchers determined that traditional satellite measurements are underestimating sea level rise by about four percent. Now that this disparity is known, corrections can be made. “The effect is systematic and relatively easy to account for,” wrote Frederikse and his co-authors. Over the course of the study, the researchers uncovered some unexpected impacts of heavier oceans, including a slight ocean floor rise in areas most impacted by sea ice and glaciers, such as Greenland and the Arctic. The small but significant change in our measurements of sea level is a reminder of all that we still do know about climate change and its impacts on every part of this planet. “ The Earth itself is not a rigid sphere, it’s a deforming ball,” said Frederikse, according to Earther . “With climate change, we do not only change temperature.” Via Earther Images via NASA and Frederikse, et. al.

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Climate change is squishing the Earth and making oceans heavier

New Jersey’s beloved walking bear "Pedals" may have been killed by hunters

October 17, 2016 by  
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Beloved New Jersey bear Pedals is said to be dead. A Facebook fan page for the American black bear who ambled around on two legs reported Pedals dead on Friday, possibly killed by hunters . Fans of Pedals are calling out for justice for the bipedal bear. Locals began to post about the upright bear on social media in 2014. It was unclear if Pedals had a congenital defect or suffered an injury; Lisa Rose-Rublack, who started a petition for the walking bear, reported he was “missing one front paw and the other is permanently injured.” Related: Criminal charges possible in Cincinnati Zoo gorilla Harambe’s death Many people were attempting to get help for Pedals and send him to The Orphaned Wildlife Center in New York. A GoFundMe page had amassed over $22,000, and over 300,000 signatures had been attached to Rose-Rublack’s petition petition calling on Governor Christie and the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife to send Pedals to the sanctuary, paid for by those who donated to the GoFundMe page. But Pedals may have been killed during a five-day black bear hunting season which took place last week. According to The New York Times, 487 bears were killed during the hunt. A Facebook page for Pedals posted, “PEDALS is dead…PEDALS is at peace now because his beautiful soul left his body when he was killed.” The NJ Division of Fish & Wildlife responded with a statement that said, “While the Division appreciates the concern for the bear, it has no way of verifying the identity of any bear that has not been previously tagged or had a DNA sample previously taken.” A spokesperson for the Division told The New York Times they had snapped photos of a bear with injuries that may or may not have been Pedals, and that they planned to release the photos some time this week. One Facebook page for Pedals asked fans to sign this petition to stop New Jersey’s “bear hunt” and write on Governor Christie’s Facebook page ” as he is the only guilty one .” Via The New York Times Images via RIP Pedals The Walking Bear Facebook

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New Jersey’s beloved walking bear "Pedals" may have been killed by hunters

Anna Garforth Unveils a 3D Digital Model of a Migrating Bear In an Urbanscape

December 4, 2012 by  
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Activist and sustainable designer Anna Garforth created a wonderful piece for the recent edition of Dutch Design Week. Dubbed ‘Wondering Territory’, the 3-D model illustrates the migration of a brown bear and the evolving urban landscapes that have spoiled its natural habitats. The recycled cardboard work woefully highlights the impact humans have had on our planet’s precious animals. Read the rest of Anna Garforth Unveils a 3D Digital Model of a Migrating Bear In an Urbanscape Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , Anna Garforth , Art , Bear , Dutch Design Week , Green Design Events , human landscape , migration , PaperCraft , recycled cardboard , Recycled Materials

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Anna Garforth Unveils a 3D Digital Model of a Migrating Bear In an Urbanscape

Dino the Facebook Bear Shot in Slovenia

March 27, 2011 by  
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Image: Facebook, Dino the Bear Dino, the bear with over 25,000 Facebook friends , mostly Italians, was shot by a hunter in Slovenia. Hunting bears is legal in Slovenia, where approximately one hundred bears are killed annually, under permits intended to maintain the population at current levels. But the bears, like Dino, that wander west into parts of Europe no longer inhabited by their species gain a degree of special prot…

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Dino the Facebook Bear Shot in Slovenia

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