LA County beaches close after massive sewage spill

January 5, 2022 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LA County beaches close after massive sewage spill

Los Angeles County suffered a sewage spill of historic proportions last week. More than 8 million gallons of raw sewage led to seven  beach  closures over the New Year weekend. It all started on Dec. 30 in the L.A. County city of Carson. A 48-inch sewer mainline near the 110 northbound offramp to 220th Street collapsed, allowing sewage to flow into the Dominguez Channel. From there it poured into  Los Angeles  Harbor. Related: LA County beaches close after an 8-hour sewage spill Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn questioned whether an aging or inadequately maintained infrastructure led to the sewer failure. “A spill of this magnitude is dangerous and unacceptable, and we need to understand what happened,” she said in a statement. “The recent storm undoubtedly contributed, but we need  infrastructure  that doesn’t fail when it rains.” Closures included Seal Beach in Orange County and seven miles of shoreline in Long Beach. To make matters even grosser, sewage oozed onto some city streets post-spill. Reporter Jessica De Nova tweeted about a sullied  neighborhood  “filled w/awful odors & this river of raw sewage running through their street Thursday.” The spill was bad timing for a popular tradition, the New Year’s Day Polar Bear “ Swim  & Dip” at Cabrillo Beach. This year would have been the event’s 70th. Instead, it was canceled. “Tragically — the annual New Year’s Day Polar Bear Swim at Cabrillo Beach has been cancelled,” Hahn tweeted. “This is a treasured local tradition — canceling it is a terrible way to start off the year.” The city of Carson had an unusually busy start to 2022, as it rigged sewage bypass systems, monitored  water , excavated the collapsed sewer, removed debris, cleaned streets and prepared for a slip-lining procedure scheduled to begin next week. “Slip-lining involves placing a 42-inch pipe within the existing 48-inch sewer, which will provide a new, corrosion-resistant pipe to carry the sewage,” the city of Carson’s website explains. “We are expecting the 42-inch pipe to be delivered later this week and the permanent repair would then begin. Once the permanent repair is done, the area can be restored including reopening the 110 offramp lanes.” By Jan. 4, sampled water from affected beaches showed that the quality again met state standards. Via City of Carson , HuffPost , The Hill Lead image via City of Carson

Read the rest here:
LA County beaches close after massive sewage spill

Furniture transforms any space in a couple of seconds

January 5, 2022 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Furniture transforms any space in a couple of seconds

A smaller space consumes less resources, but can create problems when trying to move in the furniture. Resource Furniture understands the struggle and responds with multi-purpose furniture that fits the needs of the minimalist lifestyle, reduces waste and provides solutions for small spaces.  Resource Furniture pieces are versatile, often serving more than one purpose, which intrinsically means less furniture is required in the home . This reduces consumption of products and the materials required to build them. For example, Swing, one of the company’s cornerstone wall beds, works in conjunction with the sofa for easy set up and retraction without moving any furniture to make space. Other wall beds work in conjunction with desks. Related: Cheap, durable and natural furniture from PlayWood “Unlike a sofa bed, our wall beds are designed to be comfortable and easy enough to use every single day,” said Challie Stillman, VP of sales and design at Resource Furniture. “In a studio, for example, a wall bed transforms the way an occupant lives with and in the space. The apartment can function like a one-bedroom, and the conversion from sofa to bed also allows a mental conversion to take place — out of sight, out of mind!” The company also offers a seemingly small table that converts into a dining table that will seat eight guests. That’s a recipe for a successful dinner party, even in a small space.  It also has a desk that looks like it’s part of the wall until it’s folded out to create a workspace. Anyone living, working or studying in a small space can appreciate the ability to hide a desk from sight when it’s not in use. Similarly, the company makes hidden closets, nesting table sets and modular storage solutions. The modular aspect of many of the pieces allow the user to replace parts without the waste that comes from throwing out the entire piece of furniture. However, the company is dedicated to making durable furniture and offers a lifetime warranty with that in mind.  To this end, Resource Furniture is committed to material selection and production that ensures a long usable life for each product. According to a press release, “Resource Furniture facilities and furniture craftsmen adhere to the most stringent environmental , quality and ethical standards in the world.” This is reinforced by the selection of sustainably sourced, FSC-CoC Certified, TSCA Title VI and CARB2-compliant materials. Resource Furniture’s wall beds are constructed with composite wood panels, which contain a minimum of 90% recycled and reforested wood product. Even the mattresses are environmentally-conscious, made from completely biodegradable and solvent-free materials. The company relies on water-based lacquers, paints and glues to prevent off-gassing emissions. During production, the Italian manufacturer for the wall beds, Clei, recaptures sawdust and gas by-products that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. To the very last moment of use, Resource Furniture has a plan for environmental responsibility . “I like to say that our product is low-tech — most of the products are operated manually,” said Steve Spett, cofounder of Resource Furniture. “This serves several purposes. The furniture is easy to maintain and has a long warranty. Since it uses no electricity, it’s also a zero-emission product. The products are also easy to operate and do not require any special accommodations for electrical outlet placement.” + Resource Furniture  Images via Resource Furniture

Read more here:
Furniture transforms any space in a couple of seconds

This eco artist uses her gift to highlight climate change

November 3, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This eco artist uses her gift to highlight climate change

Most people see crushed beer cans, water bottles, old coffee cups and broken shoes as trash. Not Mariah Reading. She looks at these discarded items and gets inspired to make beautiful art . Reading is an ecological artist using her gift to show the world through a different lens. She visits national parks, beaches and forests to find discarded items that become the inspiration for her art. Reading’s goal is to showcase the reality of climate change and the beauty of nature when it is left intact and undisturbed by humans. Related: Artist 3D-prints biodegradable agar floral lamps “I collect most of the trash I use as my canvas, although sometimes I have friendly neighbors who find some cool trash and gift it to me! When I complete a painted work, I photograph the item aligned within the environment it’s based off. I share and display my work with my Instagram audience, and sell both the physical paintings as well as the photographic prints of the work in both galleries and my online shop,” Reading said. Her favorite female artists include Maya Lin, Marina Abramovic, Judy Twedt, Natasha Cunningham, Lisa Ericson and Emma Longcope. But which artists helped shape Reading’s style the most? “Growing up, I was overwhelmingly inspired by M.C. Escher and Rene Magritte because their work was so transfixing and felt like the opposite of my own impressionistic paintings at the time. I find it interesting how my work has now gravitated toward optical illusions, in vain of these formative artists,” Reading told Inhabitat. As for using her artwork to shine a light on the effects of climate change , Reading said, “I think most people in my generation are hyper-conscious of climate change – eco-anxiety is hard to avoid. Being a landscape painter, I have the privilege of living in dynamic and breathtaking environments, many of which express dramatic evidence of climate change right before my eyes.” Discussing the goals of her work, Reading said, “As an eco-artist, I aim to paint the ever-changing landscapes and fleeting moments as a historical marker and as a way to protect them. I don’t think I could navigate life without trying to make the world a more beautiful place.” + Mariah Reading Photography by Mariah Reading

See the original post here: 
This eco artist uses her gift to highlight climate change

Climate change is already affecting 85% of world population

November 3, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Climate change is already affecting 85% of world population

A recent  study  Nature Climate Change has concluded that climate change is already affecting people across the world. The study found that at least 85% of the world’s population has already been affected by climate change in some way.  The unprecedented changes that await the world are not yet well understood due to limited research . One known fact is that the effects of climate change will affect poor countries more than wealthier ones. This is despite wealthier nations having fueled the majority of pollution worldwide. Related: 110 countries pledge to end deforestation by 2030 Discussing this topic, the Nature Climate Change study states, “Our results reveal a substantial ‘attribution gap’ as robust levels of evidence for potentially attributable impacts are twice as prevalent in high-income than in low-income countries.” Friederike Otto, a senior lecturer at the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College, says that we are at a time where almost everyone is exposed to the effects of climate change. “It is likely that nearly everyone in the world now experiences changes in extreme weather as a result of human greenhouse gas emissions ,” Otto said. The disparities in data across the world make it difficult to accurately predict the future. For instance, most studies concerning the effects of climate change have been conducted in North America and Europe, leaving little to no information about Africa and South America. These disparities leave huge gaps that make it impossible for the most threatened countries to prepare for climate change’s effects. Researchers have found that climate change will force behavior changes in several ways. For instance, scientists predict the need for species to move from their traditional habitats in search of habitable ones. Additionally, reforestation measures will likely become more relevant. Mangrove forests can store four times more carbon than other tropical forests, but they are threatened by rising ocean levels. With severe weather patterns already being experienced worldwide, the recent pledge to end deforestation from countries at COP26 is more necessary than ever. + Nature Climate Change Via The Revelator Lead image via Pixabay

Original post: 
Climate change is already affecting 85% of world population

Mystery crab deaths in England described as ‘apocalyptic’

November 1, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mystery crab deaths in England described as ‘apocalyptic’

Thousands of crabs and lobsters have been washing up along the Tees estuary and neighboring northeast shores in England. The continued deaths are raising alarms for locals and experts. The first sightings were reported in early October. Since then, dead lobsters and crabs have continued washing up on the shore, especially in Marske and Saltburn. The first incidents were reported near Seaton Carew, Redcar and Seaham. Related: Hermit crab study shows microplastic’s affect on marine life The deaths have attracted the attention of lawmakers, who are now asking questions. Jacob Young, Conservative MP for Redcar, has raised the matter with ministers, demanding answers over the deaths. In a statement, Young said it’s “deeply worrying that this seems to be continuing on our coastline .” Some people, such as former Redcar MP Anna Turley, have even termed the situation apocalyptic. Turley joins thousands of residents worried by the situation. According to Marske locals, last week’s beach scene was the worst so far. Both dead and living crabs were spotted on the shores, with some already decaying. Although experts have yet to establish the exact cause of the deaths, environmental groups are concerned about the ecosystem . Environmentalists have observed that the local fishing industry has experienced a 95% drop in lobster and crab catches. The Environmental Agency EA is currently working with the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) to find the reason behind the deaths. While speaking to the press, a spokesperson said that samples have been collected for analysis and that answers will be provided soon. “Samples of water , sediment, mussel and crab have been collected and are being sent to our labs for analysis to consider whether a pollution incident could have contributed to the deaths of the animals,” a spokesperson said. “We have also shared samples with CEFAS labs for disease analysis.” Via The Guardian Lead image via Pexels

See the original post:
Mystery crab deaths in England described as ‘apocalyptic’

2021’s top plastic polluters and a new petition to stop them

November 1, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 2021’s top plastic polluters and a new petition to stop them

The Break Free From Plastic movement has been gearing up for COP26 in Glasgow. The movement released its list of top plastic polluters, collected over 13,000 signatures on a petition calling for the  Biden  administration to stop approvals for new and expanded petrochemical and plastic facilities, and hosted an event about environmental racism. Last week, Break Free From Plastic released its 2021 global brand audit.  Coca-Cola  and PepsiCo took the top two spots for plastic pollution for the fourth straight year. This year, Unilever displaced Nestle for the non-coveted third spot. Nestle came in fourth and Procter & Gamble fifth. Related: Top 3 plastic polluters are CocaCola, PepsiCo and Nestle. Again. Break Free From Plastic holds companies responsible for the  plastic  winding up on the shores of the world’s oceans and rivers — even if the companies didn’t throw it away themselves. This year, 11,184 volunteers in 45 countries conducted 440 beach cleanups/brand audits. They collected 330,493 plastic waste items, 58% of which bore a consumer brand. Coca-Cola has pledged to collect an empty bottle for every bottle sold. But the 2021 brand audit retrieved almost 20,000 pieces of plastic branded by Coke, which is greater than the next top two  polluters  combined. Nor is  PepsiCo  dazzling the world with greenness, despite a recent commitment to cut its use of virgin plastic in half by 2030. Since 99% of plastic is made from  fossil fuels , virgin plastic is a major target of eco-warriors. Unilever’s move up to third place is especially embarrassing, as the company is a principal partner for the COP26 climate change summit. “Despite their promises to do better, the same corporate polluters make the brand audit list year after year. It is clear that we cannot rely on these companies to do the right thing,” Neil Tangri, Science and Policy Director of Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives, said in a statement. “It’s time for governments to step up and enact policies to reduce waste and hold producers accountable.” The only way to reduce plastic pollution, he said, is to reduce plastic production. “If world leaders do not take bold action to reduce plastic production, there is no way that we will meet the 1.5°C target and avoid  climate  catastrophe.” Break Free From Plastic’s petition against new, expanded petrochemical companies aims to push politicians to do just that. Via Break Free From Plastic Lead image via Break Free From Plastic

Read more here: 
2021’s top plastic polluters and a new petition to stop them

Black and White Beach House employs climate-ready architecture

October 12, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Black and White Beach House employs climate-ready architecture

With construction earning the unwanted title of a top-ranking dirty industry, architecture focused on energy efficiency, natural materials and durability even in the face of natural disasters is a win for the environment and the home or business owner. In consideration of the increased number of hurricanes connected to the effects of climate change in coastal communities, Unabridged Architecture developed the Black and White Beach House to address these issues. The family complex sits in an area heavily impacted by storm activity, in a historic Gulf of Mexico beach town. In fact, the previous house on the site was lost during Hurricane Katrina. In its place, Black and White Beach House has already endured two substantial hurricanes with its climate-ready design. Related: Miami Beach Convention Center receives a stunning LEED Silver makeover Unabridged Architecture co-principal Allison Anderson said, “Built on the site of a home lost in Katrina, creating architecture to last requires a willingness to experiment with form and material to meet climate challenges.” Developers placed the dual homes at the highest point of land, supported by a plinth to bring it above the flood zone. The move away from the water also preserved a grove of historic oak  trees  that have survived at least 300 years of coastal storms. The main home pays homage to traditional southern architecture with a white exterior and wraparound porch, while the next-door additional family home and outbuildings are clad in shou sugi ban, charred Accoya  wood . Between the buildings, a terraced garden provides a gathering space, and crushed limestone paths connect the areas. The  natural material  selection provides a durable and functional walkway that naturally allows stormwater to permeate the surface. Throughout the landscape, walls are built using travertine tiles, and terraces are reinforced with steel edging.  The invasive species that had taken over the lot following Hurricane Katrina were replaced with native  plants  that grow well with few water requirements. The native habitat is also salt-tolerant and attracts a variety of animals. Architects also addressed  energy efficiency  with deep overhangs, an airtight building envelope, and comprehensive insulation. As stated in a press release, Unabridged Architecture is “rooted deeply in building for the future. Their mission is to produce sustainable, resilient design, specializing in architectural responses to climate challenges. Most notably — their substantial role in rebuilding Mississippi towns post-Katrina and winning a COTE “Top Ten” award for their Marine Education Center at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory project.”  + Unabridged Architecture Images via Unabridged Architecture 

Go here to see the original: 
Black and White Beach House employs climate-ready architecture

England plans single-use plastic ban

August 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on England plans single-use plastic ban

England has announced a planned ban on polystyrene cups and single-use plastic cutlery and plates. But frustrated activists say the government is moving way too slowly. This autumn, the English government will start coming up with a plan to curtail single-use plastic and polystyrene perhaps within a couple of years. Meanwhile, the  EU  banned these same items in July. Related: 4ocean and Poralu Marine present BeBot, the beach cleaning robot The English government has a firmer plan for a plastic packaging tax, which will go into effect in April 2022. Companies that use plastic with less than 30% recycled content will have to pay a tax of £200 per ton of plastic. This measure seeks to encourage the use of  recycled  material. “We’ve all seen the damage that plastic does to our  environment ,” said George Eustice, environment secretary, as reported by The Guardian. “It is right that we put in place measures that will tackle the plastic carelessly strewn across our parks and green spaces and washed up on beaches. We have made progress to turn the tide on plastic, now we are looking to go a step further.” England has already successfully limited some plastics. Since supermarkets started charging for plastic bags in 2015, their use has dropped by 95%. In 2018, England banned plastic microbeads from use in washing products. In 2020, it was goodbye to plastic  straws , drink stirrers and cotton swabs — or cotton buds, as they’re called in England. However, England is still lagging on charging deposits on plastic bottles, which probably won’t happen until 2024 or 2025. Americans and British people lead the world in per person plastic  waste . According to British ministers, the average person uses 37 single-use forks, knives and spoons and 18 disposable plastic plates each year. Plastic litter is blamed for killing more than 100,000 sea mammals and turtles and 1 million birds annually worldwide. Vegetable and fruit stickers, PVC cling film, teabags,  plastic  coffee pods and crisp packets may also find themselves forbidden in the future. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

Continued here:
England plans single-use plastic ban

Copper-clad Bondi House highlights compact, multi-level living

August 24, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Copper-clad Bondi House highlights compact, multi-level living

Armed with a thoughtful combination of natural light, garden outlooks and angled design, this copper-clad townhouse in Australia manages to achieve compact, multi-level living with a deep sense of  privacy  — despite its location on an exposed corner site. The Bondi House, named for the beachy suburb where it’s located in eastern Sydney, comes from Fox Johnston Architects and has already been shortlisted for the 2021 Australian Interior Design Awards, Houses Awards and the AIA NSW Architecture Awards. The home itself spans an impressive 212 square meters on a 153 square meter site, while still leaving room for  landscape  spaces for the owners to cultivate. The small space doesn’t infringe upon the neighbors either, instead using its setback and deep balcony to offer up additional space along the public walkway and light to the homes on the northwest side. Related: A sustainable, zinc-clad family home on a budget in Australia The living room uses concrete floors paired with exposed timber beams, as well as windows and doors crafted from western red cedar. The architects also chose local Sydney sandstone for the office plinth and dark stone for the kitchen benchtops. Natural light and organic tones cover the entire interior, culminating in a central  courtyard  that separates the kitchen from the living room, accented with curved windows. The office sits where the car space once stood, though the area could easily be refitted into a parking space if the owners ever choose to sell the property.  “The central courtyard was an early idea we developed to gather light and segment the living level into zones, which we think is more interesting in a small space, rather than that feeling of just being in one long room,” said Conrad Johnston, Director at Fox Johnston. “The copper wall is big gesture for the setting and the street. Next to a traditional semi we’ve attached this bold, curved copper wall on a tiny block. This sculptural element crowns and connects the entire site. It’s a bit full on but in a gentle way.” Copper lasts long and doesn’t easily degrade or corrode, making it immune to most environmental elements or hazards. Plus, it is completely  recyclable  at the end of its life.  Other sustainable features to the home include locally sourced construction materials, low VOC diminishes, 4 Green Start fittings and fixtures, native landscaping to reduce water usage and a 3,000-liter  rainwater  tank for irrigation. + Fox Johnston Via ArchDaily Images courtesy of Brett Boardman

Original post:
Copper-clad Bondi House highlights compact, multi-level living

The High Performance Surfing Center honors nature inside and out

July 23, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The High Performance Surfing Center honors nature inside and out

When Branco Cavaleiro Architects was asked to develop a plan to house the High Performance Surfing Center in Cabedelo, Viana do Castelo, Portugal, the designers chose to incorporate protections for visitors as well as the surrounding landscape. The High Performance Surfing Center was designed with sustainable construction in mind. This idea was reflected in the selection of green building materials and choice to reduce energy consumption. Situated on a dune system within a grove of pine trees, the Surfing Center needed to respect the natural environment. For minimal site impact , architects designed the building to perch over the dunes through the use of pillars. Similarly, they worked around the pine trees, allowing the trees to remain untouched. Related: Eco hotel and golf resort boasts ocean views in Portugal The campus includes dormitories, a service area and a surf training wing with a gym and showers. The different wings connect with a central patio, which leads to the beach. The love for the surrounding nature is seen throughout the buildings via geothermal temperature control, LED lighting with a centralized management system for optimal efficiency and cladding in agglomerated black cork , which surrounds the whole building, including the roof. Designers kept sustainability in mind with the use of the cork, a local natural material in Portugal. The architects said, “Cork is a 100% natural, recyclable, non-toxic and durable material. In the process of manufacturing cork products, 100% of the material’s resources are used, in which production waste is reused again for cork agglomerates.” They explained that cork is “associated with behavior as a barrier against soil desertification, as it provides micro-ecosystems with high biodiversity, as well as contributing to the fixation of CO2.” The building’s tight envelope and thermal enhancements provide a high level of energy efficiency . Vast windows allow views, but the glazing minimizes heat transfer. Windows on the south side have a higher solar factor, while those facing north have a lower solar factor. + Branco Cavaleiro Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by José Campos via Branco Cavaleiro Architects

Original post: 
The High Performance Surfing Center honors nature inside and out

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8355 access attempts in the last 7 days.