Japanese researchers create tasty new banana with a thin edible peel

February 5, 2018 by  
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Researchers in Japan have developed a new banana , which possesses a peel thin enough to eat. According to Quartz , the researchers developed the Mongee Banana using the freeze thaw awakening method – and sell the sweet treat for around $6 a pop. Here’s how freeze thaw awakening works: bananas tend to be cultivated in tropical locations, with temperatures staying around 80 degrees Fahrenheit, but D&T Farm keeps their banana trees in temperatures of around negative 76 degrees Fahrenheit before replanting them in 80 degrees Fahrenheit environments. This prompts the bananas to grow rapidly, so the peel doesn’t completely mature and ends up thin, soft, and delicious, according to Quartz. National Geographic explained the fruit “matures before the skin can catch up.” Related: Stop throwing away banana peels – eat them instead HI Kyosyke ! Have you tasted it? Mongee Banana, the most interresting thing about this banana is that you can eat the skin! I'ts only grown in OKAYAMA Perfecture, and they only sell 10 bananas per week. D&T Farm in Okayama. @ffffujiwara pic.twitter.com/jLKj1FCnSx — hapa (@hapahr) January 27, 2018 The company says on the Mongee Banana website the product is not genetically modified , and is pesticide -free. The peel contains extra zinc, magnesium, vitamin B6, tryptophan, and sugar – Quartz cited Japanese media as saying the banana actually contains 24.8 grams of sugar, beating a regular banana’s sugar content of around 18 grams. They also cited taste-testers at outlet Rocket News 24 as saying the banana smelled similar to a pineapple and had a tropical taste. Mashable said the edible skin has a lettuce-like texture. Good luck snagging one of these fruits, though. Mongee Bananas are available in tiny, 10-banana batches, and one will run you $6. But Quartz said D&T Farm hopes to expand and is looking for more banana farmers. The banana is Japan’s most popular fruit, although they currently import 99 percent of the bananas they eat. + Mongee Banana Via Quartz , Mashable , and National Geographic Images via Depositphotos and Lotte Löhr on Unsplash

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Japanese researchers create tasty new banana with a thin edible peel

The top 5 Inhabitat videos of the year

December 31, 2016 by  
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From foraging for mushrooms (and avoiding the poisonous ones) to eating your banana peels instead of throwing them away and touring NYC’s first micro apartment buildings , we had loads of fun bringing you all sorts of videos this year. Check out our top 5 videos of the year below and vote for your favorite. [poll id=118]

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The top 5 Inhabitat videos of the year

Banana Peels Can Remove Toxic Metals From Wastewater According to Scientists

March 13, 2011 by  
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We’ve seen a lot of interesting and inexpensive green methods of cleaning wastewater: algae , sewage eating poo-gloos , and indoor wetlands , just to name a few.

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Banana Peels Can Remove Toxic Metals From Wastewater According to Scientists

Chemist Discovers a Non-Prank Use for Banana Peels

January 3, 2011 by  
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Photo: sandman_kk / CC Like a yellow jumpsuit that every banana must shed before going skinny-dipping in our tummies — those infamous peels have eluded any further purpose for centuries. But, just when you thought that banana peels were destined merely to be the tormentor of cartoon characters and video-game go-kart racers, science has finally found a use to nature’s most slippery litter. It turns out that peels can do more than clean the clock of some unobservant pedestrian — they can clean dirty water, too….

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Chemist Discovers a Non-Prank Use for Banana Peels

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