Northern Chinas largest bamboo pavilion covers nearly half an acre

March 17, 2020 by  
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After years of building bamboo houses across rural China, Italian architect Mauricio Cardenas Laverde completed his largest bamboo project yet — the Bamboo Eye pavilion, a 1,600-square-meter structure constructed entirely from 5,000 locally sourced moso bamboo poles. Completed last April for the 2019 International Horticultural Exhibition in Beijing, the new pavilion is the largest of its kind ever built in northern China, according to the International Bamboo and Rattan Organization (INBAR) . The massive pavilion was created to house programmatic activity while showcasing the architectural possibilities of bamboo in modern, low-carbon construction. Created to follow the INBAR Garden’s theme of “Bamboo and Rattan for Green Growth,” the Bamboo Eye Pavilion shows off the tensile strength of bamboo, which is greater than that of mild steel. China, which is home to over 6 million hectares of bamboo, has used bamboo for construction for thousands of years. Modern construction in the country, however, mainly depends on steel and concrete. In an effort to promote the use of bamboo for sustainable development, INBAR teamed up with Laverde to show how bamboo could replace steel and wood and thus reduce pressures on forest resources. Related: Turtle-inspired bamboo shelter contracts to half its size in case of extreme weather “We have to change the way we think about construction,” Laverde said. “If we used natural building materials in cities and changed our mindset, then it would be easy to rebuild every few decades without the huge cost of today.” The organic form of the Bamboo Eye pavilion is achieved with bamboo arches, which span 32 meters in length and 9 meters in height. The arches were bent and formed by fire baking, a process that turns the bamboo to a golden yellow and expands the material’s lifespan to 30 years. Lightweight yet strong, the truss arch structure is also sturdy enough to bear the weight of a green roof , which helps blend the building in with the nearby bamboo forest. The self-ventilating interior houses an auditorium and exhibition area. The Bamboo Pavilion was built for the International Horticultural Exhibition that was held from April to October 2019.  + Mauricio Cardenas Laverde Images via INBAR

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Northern Chinas largest bamboo pavilion covers nearly half an acre

Ramboll helps Lombok locals build earthquake-resistant bamboo housing

January 17, 2020 by  
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In 2018 when Lombok was struck by several earthquakes, some measuring up to magnitude 7, local communities around the seismic region were greatly affected. After the series of earthquakes settled, there were over 500 people dead, 445,000 people homeless and 129,000 homes damaged. Concerned that the quality of the area’s buildings was partially to blame, Els Houttave, founder of the Lombok-based charity Grenzeloos Milieu, knew that something had to be done to ensure this type of devastation never happened again. She teamed up with Ramboll bridge engineer Xavier Echegaray and structural engineer Marcin Dawydzik to find a solution that was both sustainable and resilient. When Dawydzik traveled to Lombok, he discovered the problem was in the building techniques and materials : “Villages were flattened with bricks and rubble scattered all around, in many cases the building foundations were all that remained. This was not an unusually powerful earthquake for the region, but lack of reinforcement in the buildings meant the damage, and consequential loss of life, was far greater than it should have been. What I found even more disturbing was that communities had already started rebuilding with the same absence of structural integrity that had existed in the destroyed buildings!”   As it turns out, the building solution was closer than expected. The partially-destroyed villages were surrounded by bamboo forests, a time-honored building material that is lightweight, strong, affordable, sustainable and reaches full maturity in about five years. Working hand-in-hand with the locals, Ramboll has now built three prototype earthquake-proof “template houses” made almost entirely out of locally-sourced bamboo. The homes are raised on cross-braced columns with a central staircase leading to the living area and space for two bedrooms. The walls are finished with bamboo woven sheets or canes and the roofing is made from recycled Tetra Pak carton packaging.  Going even further, the project headed by Grenzeloos Milieu and University College London will provide locals with a free blueprint on how to construct affordable earthquake-proof homes without complicated construction knowledge necessary. Additionally, Grenzeloos Milieu is growing more bamboo forests and teaching communities how to harvest the trees for food and construction. Ramboll volunteers on the ground in Lombok will teach the process hands-on while ensuring safety and efficiency . + Ramboll Via Dezeen Images via Ramboll

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Ramboll helps Lombok locals build earthquake-resistant bamboo housing

Bamboo 101 for Your Household

January 14, 2020 by  
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Families that are striving to live greener can make many … The post Bamboo 101 for Your Household appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Bamboo 101 for Your Household

We Earthlings: Recycling Jobs

January 14, 2020 by  
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What connects us all? Nature and our shared relationships through … The post We Earthlings: Recycling Jobs appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Turtle-inspired bamboo shelter contracts to half its size in case of extreme weather

November 21, 2019 by  
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With extreme weather wreaking havoc around the world, there is a need for resilient shelters more than ever before. EEMY Architecture and Design has created a sustainable and resilient structure that can withstand nearly all severe conditions. Delta is a bamboo shelter that retracts into itself when challenged by stormy weather and expands during non-severe weather. Delta was created in collaboration with the World Bank, Build Academy, Airbnb and GFDRR. Using the Philippines as an example of areas that are prone to natural disasters , the team’s design strategy was to create something that could withstand even the most extreme weather emergencies, from floods and superstorms to typhoons and earthquakes. The structure was inspired by the traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses. The main frame is comprised of 12-centimeter-wide bamboo poles with trusses built in between for added stability. The bamboo poles are treated with a boron solution that makes them repellent to insects, a common issue in tropical climates. Related: Ingenious cardboard and bamboo emergency shelters by Shigeru Ban pop up in Sydney Created in a wide, pyramidal shape, the structure is elevated off the ground to withstand high waters. When bad weather hits, the shelter can contract to half its size, much like a turtle does at the first sign of danger. This feature is made possible by a series of folding bamboo tents that contract to half the structure’s size (430 square feet) and expand to its full size (861 square feet) after a storm. Additionally, the structure’s many windows and “wings” can be used for a variety of purposes, such as a shade from the harsh sun, drying racks or even market stalls. In addition to its flexible, sustainable and resilient design features, the Delta shelter comes with an incredibly reasonable price tag and construction time. Each bamboo shelter starts at $8,500 and can be constructed within 28 days. + EEMY Architecture and Design Images via EEMY Architecture and Design

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Turtle-inspired bamboo shelter contracts to half its size in case of extreme weather

This eco-friendly bamboo restaurant was built in just 5 weeks

July 12, 2019 by  
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Crystal-blue waters, luxury accommodations and tropical appeal aren’t the only draws of Sundy Praia , São Tomé and Príncipe’s first five?star resort. The sustainably minded destination is also home to an award-winning restaurant designed by French architect-designer agency D.L.2.A (Didier Lefort Architectes Associés). Crafted in the shape of a large fish, the restaurant features a bamboo structure that was mainly assembled by hand and built in just five weeks. Located in the Gulf of Guinea off the western coast of Africa, Sundy Praia on the island of Príncipe was created with low-impact luxury in mind. Hidden among tropical almond and banana trees are the resort’s 15 tented villas, each anchored into the ground with retractable screws to reduce impact on the forest. In keeping with this eco-friendly ethos, designer Didier Lefort created a bamboo restaurant that uses local craftsmanship and materials. Related: Bamboo community center empowers the local Brazilian community Crafted to resemble a large fish with an undulating spine and a wide-open mouth, the building structure comprises a series of bamboo arches of varying dimensions that are fastened by hand with natural ties and only bolted at key areas. Measuring 24 meters from head to tail, the restaurant can accommodate up to 100 people inside and on the terrace. The undulating size of the restaurant — from its width to its height — creates spaces for different guests. The narrowest end of the restaurant, for instance, is for VIPs who wish to dine quietly, while the large “belly” area accommodates families. The “mouth of the fish” at the entrance is a popular place for couples wanting to dine by candlelight.  The interior of the restaurant is also dressed in locally crafted products, such as the chandeliers braided from bamboo and inspired by fishermen creels and the large curtains that are held together by strings of large seeds. The long buffet tables are designed by the D.L.2.A agency. + D.L.2.A Photography by Géraldine Bruneel via D.L.2.A

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This eco-friendly bamboo restaurant was built in just 5 weeks

Architects envision sustainable bamboo mass housing for Malaysia

July 2, 2019 by  
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Overshadowed by steel, brick and concrete, bamboo is no longer a major material for everyday Malaysian construction. Yet Cyberjaya-based architectural firm Eleena Jamil Architect believes that the sustainable material should and can join the ranks of modern construction materials. To prove that bamboo is not only a sustainable building material but also a viable one for long-term construction projects, the architects have designed Bamboo Terrace Homes, an eco-friendly proposal for mass contemporary housing built predominately from locally harvested bamboo. Modeled after the typical 22-foot-wide terrace houses found across Malaysia, Eleena Jamil Architect proposed Bamboo Terrace Homes can be used in both urban and suburban areas. Although bamboo has historically been used in Malaysian architecture, the material fell by the wayside due to its low natural resistance to pests and rot when alternative materials, such as steel and brick, rose to prominence. However, the architects said that properly treated and preserved bamboo is strong and resilient enough to be used as a long-term building material. Related: Competition-winning Bamboo Stadium is a sustainable solution to Lagos’ former landfill In their proposal, treated bamboo forms the main structures save for the bathroom enclosures, which will be made of prefabricated lightweight concrete volumes to keep moisture away from the structural bamboo components. The structural bamboo frames would be prefabricated , mass-produced and flat-packed to reduce costs and environmental impact. Bamboo columns would be used to hold up the engineered bamboo floors and roofs, while the internal and external walls would be built from a lightweight bamboo composite board system. According to Eleena Jamil Architect, the Bamboo Terrace Homes would have lower construction costs and a small carbon footprint as compared to standard terrace homes without compromising quality of living. Each contemporary house would include an internal courtyard, balconies and an open-plan floor layout to enhance flexibility. Ample natural light and ventilation would be welcomed indoors through large glazed openings, while large overhangs and balconies reduce heat gain. The proposal is only in the conceptual phase; however, the firm hopes that the design will inspire developers and the local government to adopt bamboo as a sustainable building material. + Eleena Jamil Architect Image via Eleena Jamil Architect

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Architects envision sustainable bamboo mass housing for Malaysia

9 ways to introduce nature into your dull work space

March 27, 2019 by  
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Your home, office or home office can be your sanctuary even when deadlines loom. Mitigate the stress of your work surroundings by bringing the intrinsic calm of nature into your office space. From the selection of natural elements to green design,  there are many ways to connect with nature even when you’re trapped between four walls. Here’s some inspiration to help transform your work space into a lively zen zone. Set a theme It’s easier to pull together a complete look with a theme in mind. Are you thinking Japanese garden , have an affinity for hot air balloons, need a forest feel or love the beach? When planning, think about the colors, sights and sounds associated with that activity or space. Choose scents, colors, textures and green designs that represent your favorite natural places. Related: A tiny, 96-square-foot rustic pavilion brings the outdoors in Music For an all-encompassing natural environment , set up a station on your favorite listening app and enjoy tropical birds, ocean waves, wind or simple meditative sounds as you work. Paint and wallpaper If you have the ability to design your own space, start with a wall color that screams nature. From seafoam to forest green right through greys, browns and blues, there are endless options for your wall color. For a bolder look, you could have someone paint a mural or use a premade wall wrap with a forest or ocean print. Wallpaper is another option for all or part of your space, especially if you don’t have any windows where you can actually see the world during your work day. Wall and room decor Your eyes can play tricks on you, and that is not always a bad thing. Surrounding yourself in outdoor decor can visually transport you from the monotonous task at hand to a sandy beach with an umbrella drink until you are able to make it there in person. Again, follow your theme if you wish, but always select pieces that bring you joy. For some, that might be a framed photo of a bike race and for another it might be the profile a person standing on the summit of a mountain. Choose wall decor with your outdoor happy place in mind. Then, accentuate that theme around the room with seashells, pinecones, wood carvings, glass floats, rocks and a snuggly theme-printed blanket. Plants Plants obviously grow in nature, therefore making them the most obvious way to bring the outdoor world inside and a touch of green to your day. Depending on the size of your work space, you could have a single plant or an entire wall of them. For a desk in a cubicle, think about plants that will thrive without direct sunlight. If you are blessed with a window to the outdoors, take advantage of the filtered or focused light. Add plants to bookcases and file cabinets to surround yourself in greenery. Many plants are forgiving enough to survive less-than-ideal growing conditions. Put a spider plant up high so it can drape down the sides. For your desk, incorporate succulents, cactus or bamboo. Even fresh flowers, rotated out frequently, will bring a smile when you enter your space. Remember to stay away from wildflowers and strong scents if you share a space with others who might be allergic. Related: 10 easy eco-friendly home decor tips Open the window In addition to artificial scents, bring in the real thing every chance you get. Open the windows regularly and swing open the door— if you have one. Combine sounds and smells with natural wood or seashell wind chimes. Set fragrant flowers near the window to encourage the pleasant scent to waft through the space. Scents In addition to the visual aspect of your office design, remember to feed the other senses too. Part of the joy of nature is the scents that surround you while you paddleboard or meditate. The good news is that you can bring those scents into the workplace to bring a little calm to your day. Candles or incense (again consider the allergies of others) can remind you of that Caribbean vacation or afternoon in the salty beach air. Musky or woodsy aromas take you right to the forest. If candles are too strong of a scent, try bringing in natural woods. Think of the smell when you open a cedar chest or lay fresh bark dust and you’ll see what we mean here— maybe some driftwood from a recent trip or pinecones you’ve collected at some point. Water feature Another way to feed the need for the outdoor sensory experience is through the sounds of moving water. Even a small desktop fountain can help muffle the sounds from the neighboring cubicle and help maintain focus. For a larger space, you can bring in a freestanding wall water feature or other fountain. With so many varieties available you can create the sound you want through material selection and size. The further the water falls, the louder the sound and remember that wood mutes the sound more than rock and other materials. Other natural elements If you have the opportunity to design your space from the ground up, consider each material carefully. For example, go with a natural wood flooring option in either a hardwood or laminate material. Select soft, natural window coverings that allow light into the room. Even desk accessories can bring a natural element when you select bamboo instead of metal or plastic. Just because you are saddled up to a desk doesn’t mean you have to lock the outdoors out. Instead, envision where you want to be and surround yourself with those green elements. Remember to consider all of the senses when you brainstorm ideas and make your workspace a retreat that inspires. Images via Shutterstock

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9 ways to introduce nature into your dull work space

‘Funnel-shaped’ cabin in an Ecuadorian forest is made of locally sourced wood

March 22, 2019 by  
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When it comes to creating living spaces that meld into their environment, savvy architects are showing us that sometimes less is definitely more. Quito-based architect Emilio Lopez has just unveiled a beautiful cabin made with  locally sourced wood and bamboo. At approximately 1,200 square feet, Cabana Don Juan is formed like a boxy funnel, with both sides featuring large glazed walls that provide stunning views of the coast on one side and a lush forest on the other. Located in the country’s Manabí Province, the beautiful two-story cabin is tucked into a native deciduous forest. Built on top of a hill along the coast line, the home rests in a setting that is picture-perfect, with views of the ocean on one side and the forest on the other. Related: Sculptural wood cabin is an alpine retreat with magnificent views To make the most of its natural environment, Lopez designed the cabin in a unique funnel shape with two extended sides that feature ultra-high, all-glass facades. The shell of the home is made out of concrete and covered with locally-sourced Amarillo and Asta wood. The interior was clad in eco-friendly bamboo , which provides a warm and cozy atmosphere. The living space is approximately 1,200 square feet, spanning two levels that connect through double-height ceilings. The ground floor houses the living, dining and kitchen area, while the two loft-like bedrooms are on the second floor, facing the ocean. The open-plan layout with large windows not only embeds the cabin and its inhabitants into the surroundings but also provides natural light and ventilation throughout the year. + Emilio Lopez Via Dwell Photography by Jag Studio via Emilio Lopez

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‘Funnel-shaped’ cabin in an Ecuadorian forest is made of locally sourced wood

Adobe brick combines with wood in a low-carbon villa in Chiang Mai

March 14, 2019 by  
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Architectural practice Chiangmai Life Architects has completed a striking villa that blends elements of traditional Thai architecture together with environmentally savvy construction practices and modern amenities fit for 21st-century living. Located in the mountains of northern Thailand , the project, dubbed the ‘Earth & Wood Villa,’ was built primarily of locally sourced natural materials from the self-made adobe bricks to the exposed timber elements throughout. In addition to mountain vistas, the property is sandwiched between Lamyai tree orchards and rice fields, views of which are maximized throughout the home. Spanning an area of nearly 7,500 square feet, the expansive residence serves as the family home for a couple and their three children. The main house is a U-shaped structure oriented toward the north with four bedrooms lined up in a row in the east-facing private wing. The open-plan living area, dining room, kitchen and pantry are clustered across a hallway in the south of the building; full-height glazed folding doors open the living room and dining area up to an outdoor swimming pool. An entertainment area is in the west wing. A small home office is tucked into a second-floor mezzanine gallery and overlooks views of the surrounding landscape. The guest cottage with a sunset veranda sits adjacent to the main house. To meet modern living comforts, the residence is equipped with air conditioning in the private wing; however, it relies solely on natural ventilation in the living areas. Large openings allow for cross breezes and hot air while the raised roof — inspired by local vernacular architecture — permits hot air to escape and induces air circulation. The thick adobe brick walls that were built of local clay, sand and bamboo shavings provide thermal insulation. The exterior is coated in a water-resistant mixture of lime and fine earth powder. Related: Breathtaking bamboo building withstands earthquakes and boasts a zero-carbon footprint Locally sourced  bamboo  was used to construct the carport, barn and entrance gate; natural stone tiles were used for flooring. “The client was looking for a modern interpretation of using natural materials,” Chiangmai Life Architects explained. “Adobe brick walls combined with wooden roof structures were designed in a way to make this earth and wood residence both functional as a modern family home as well as in harmony with its environment and surroundings. This meant a design and finish fit for the needs and requirements of a 21st century family.” + Chiangmai Life Architects Photogrpahy by  Alberto Cosi , drone shots by Markus Roselieb via Chiangmai Life Architects

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Adobe brick combines with wood in a low-carbon villa in Chiang Mai

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