The worlds first 3D-printed reinforced concrete bridge is almost complete

September 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Eindhoven University of Technology has a massive 3D printer capable of printing immense objects – and it’s currently creating the world’s first 3D-printed reinforced concrete bridge. The bridge will be installed this month in the small Dutch town of Gemert, and it will be the first of its kind thanks to an innovative printing technique that reduces waste. Technically, Madrid introduced the world’s first 3D-printed bridge earlier this year – but the Gemert bridge will be built using a special process that reinforces the concrete layers with steel cables as the concrete blocks are formed. This technique – which was was developed by a team of researchers working with Teho Salat, a professor of concrete construction – ensures that the bridge’s concrete is “pre-stressed” in order to avoid the typical tensile stress that often occurs in concrete construction. Related: World’s first 3D-printed pedestrian bridge pops up in Madrid The concrete used to print the bridge is thicker than normal, so it retains its form as it is printed. This is important because it means little – if any – concrete is wasted. Concrete production releases carbon dioxide, so reducing waste is incredibly important for the environment. Additionally, printing with moldable concrete means there’s no need for formwork, again reducing the amount of materials needed for construction. Working in collaboration with Dutch company BAM Infra , the team has spent two months printing the pieces, which will then be fused together to construct the bridge. The structure is slated to be installed in Gemert in late September. + Eindhoven University of Technology + BAM Infra Via 3D Print Images via BAM Infra

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The worlds first 3D-printed reinforced concrete bridge is almost complete

NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

September 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Harvey unloaded around 33 trillion gallons of water in the United States, the weight of which is capable of bending the Earth’s crust . From satellite data , it looks like this is what happened in Houston . Scientist Chris Milliner of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory tweeted a map with GPS data revealing Houston has been pushed down by around two centimeters (or about 0.8 inches). Milliner’s map included Nevada Geodetic Laboratory data revealing the area around Houston was actually pushed down because of the weight of all the water from the tropical storm . One gallon of water weighs around 8.34 pounds, so if Harvey dumped 33 trillion gallons of water, that’s about 275 trillion pounds. Related: Arctic warming likely turned Harvey into “an extreme killer storm” GPS data show #Harveyflood was so large it flexed Earth's crust, pushing #Houston down by ~2 cm! #EarthScience #HurricaneHarvey #txflood pic.twitter.com/88lNScJBq9 — Chris Milliner (@Geo_GIF) September 4, 2017 It’s not the first time scientists have documented how the weight of water can alter the land. The Altantic cited a 2012 study focusing on the Himalayas that found a seasonal flux in the mountains’ height as water fell and then made its way down the mountains into Asian rivers. They also noted a 2017 study found “vertical surface displacement [with] peak-to-peak amplitudes” of 0.5 to one centimeter in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The Atlantic suggested the changes around Houston could be seen as a “fast-action version” of what takes place in mountain ranges during the seasons. The change could be due to soil beneath GPS stations compacting because of the weight of the water, Milliner said. But he thinks crust deformation was the main means of the change, since some of the GPS stations are on bedrock and also saw the depression. The ground has already been sinking in Houston, because we’ve pumped groundwater out of the city’s aquifers, according to The Atlantic. Milliner clarified the phenomenon he saw after Harvey is in addition to subsidence the city has experienced. Via The Atlantic Images via Chris Milliner on Twitter and U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Zachary Wolf

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NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

Shimmering LED-studded tower focuses on sustainability in Seoul

September 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

American firm The Beck Group designed an office tower in Seoul that makes its focus on sustainability a beautiful asset. Known as The Harim Group Headquarters, the 86,000-square-foot tower features many energy-saving technologies, including an attractive S-shaped recess in the facade that creates a low pressure zone for facilitating natural ventilation on every floor. The sculptural building is studded with LED light fixtures that give the facade and interior a shimmering effect. As the largest agricultural business in Korea, the Harim Group wanted a headquarters building that would be highly visible in Seoul and show off the firm’s commitment to sustainability. Thus, the Harim Group Headquarters is located in Seoul’s flashy Gangnam district on one of the city’s busiest pedestrian streets and cuts an impressive figure in the city skyline, both day and night. Fourteen stories of office spaces are stacked atop three stories of retail and restaurant space at the base to engage the public. Related: World’s newest mega-skyscraper opens in Seoul The curving S-shaped recess that stretches from the ground-floor retail to the roof garden gives the building visual identity, while allowing for natural ventilation. Polished and perforated stainless steel panels line the recess and are illuminated with white LEDs that create a shimmering effect. The building’s energy use is further reduced with operable low-E coated windows, a building automation system, green roof, rainwater harvesting system, and an underfloor air distribution system. + The Beck Group Via ArchDaily Images via The Beck Group

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Shimmering LED-studded tower focuses on sustainability in Seoul

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