Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food

May 15, 2020 by  
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Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food Jim Giles Fri, 05/15/2020 – 00:05 Today I bring you exclusive data from the cutting edge of food science. Let me begin by managing expectations. This experiment is so grievously flawed that, to paraphrase Groucho Marx, I would not submit it to any journal likely to accept it. The experiment in question is a taste test of a new product from Berkeley-based startup Prime Roots . Its flaws begin with the sample size, which is n=1. Our sole tester is Jay Giles, aged 6. Here he is, pre-test: Jay is nonetheless an interesting subject, because he frequently exhibits high levels of hostility toward novel foodstuffs. Requests that he eat something not on his (extremely short) list of pre-approved foods are typically met with claims that “today is the worst day ever,” followed by various acts of low-level vandalism. Jay’s list of pre-approved foods includes bacon. It does not include fake bacon made from fungi grown in a vat, the subject of our test. Because I value my sanity and the structural integrity of my home, I have told him that it is real bacon. Which brings us to the question I set out to answer: Will he notice the difference? I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. My experiment may be ridiculous, but this question isn’t. Most experts say that reducing meat consumption is an essential part of cutting greenhouse gas emissions from food systems, which contribute a quarter of the global total . It’s also one of the easier ways that individuals can make a difference. Shifting to a vegetarian meal just one day a week, for instance, saves the equivalent of driving more than 1,000 miles over the course of a year. A lot more meat-eaters will make that change if they can switch to a convincing substitute. Prior to my experiment, my wife offered to wager me any sum of money that our tester would not eat the bacon. I opened the packet and was glad I declined. The new bacon looks, at best, bacon-ish:   Then I sniffed: Hint of dank. I was reminded of a musty basement from a childhood home. It wasn’t an altogether unpleasant smell, but it didn’t exactly shout “breakfast” at me.  Luckily our tester was too busy playing with Lego to notice, so I hastily began frying. Matters improved. The bacon-not-bacon sizzled, the dank odor lessened and I got wafts of real bacon. Our tester wandered over. He looked hesitant. “What are those bubbles?” he asked. I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. Calamity averted, he sat down. I served Jay with a plate of fungi masquerading as bacon. “What’s this?” he said, looking skeptical as he tentatively chewed the edge of one slice. “Bacon,” I lied. He frowned. Sensing disaster, I abandoned methodological integrity and offered him tomato ketchup. Too late. Jay piled up the neatly sliced pieces of bacon and deposited them on my place. To my relief, he then turned his attention not to retribution but to his buttered toast. Was that it for this great emissions-reducing superfood? It seemed so… but wait! What’s this? A second tester! Eight-year-old Sam Giles was excluded from our experimental protocol because he does not like bacon. Until this morning, that is. Now he’s munching away, renewing my hope in humanity’s ability to save itself from climate catastrophe through low-carbon eating. “I don’t like the normal kind but I do like this one,” said Sam. “You’re the only one,” replied Jay. “It tastes like tree trunks.” I’m tempted to speculate on what this means for the future of alternative proteins, but I suspect the answer is not very much. So I’ll just say that I joined Sam and enjoyed my breakfast. Prime Roots bacon doesn’t taste much like bacon, but it’s salty and crispy and generally pretty good. I’ll eat it again. Pull Quote I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. Topics Food Systems Alternative Protein Featured Column Foodstuff Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A taste test of a new product from Berkeley-based startup Prime Roots. Close Authorship

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Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food

Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food

May 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

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Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food Jim Giles Fri, 05/15/2020 – 00:05 Today I bring you exclusive data from the cutting edge of food science. Let me begin by managing expectations. This experiment is so grievously flawed that, to paraphrase Groucho Marx, I would not submit it to any journal likely to accept it. The experiment in question is a taste test of a new product from Berkeley-based startup Prime Roots . Its flaws begin with the sample size, which is n=1. Our sole tester is Jay Giles, aged 6. Here he is, pre-test: Jay is nonetheless an interesting subject, because he frequently exhibits high levels of hostility toward novel foodstuffs. Requests that he eat something not on his (extremely short) list of pre-approved foods are typically met with claims that “today is the worst day ever,” followed by various acts of low-level vandalism. Jay’s list of pre-approved foods includes bacon. It does not include fake bacon made from fungi grown in a vat, the subject of our test. Because I value my sanity and the structural integrity of my home, I have told him that it is real bacon. Which brings us to the question I set out to answer: Will he notice the difference? I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. My experiment may be ridiculous, but this question isn’t. Most experts say that reducing meat consumption is an essential part of cutting greenhouse gas emissions from food systems, which contribute a quarter of the global total . It’s also one of the easier ways that individuals can make a difference. Shifting to a vegetarian meal just one day a week, for instance, saves the equivalent of driving more than 1,000 miles over the course of a year. A lot more meat-eaters will make that change if they can switch to a convincing substitute. Prior to my experiment, my wife offered to wager me any sum of money that our tester would not eat the bacon. I opened the packet and was glad I declined. The new bacon looks, at best, bacon-ish:   Then I sniffed: Hint of dank. I was reminded of a musty basement from a childhood home. It wasn’t an altogether unpleasant smell, but it didn’t exactly shout “breakfast” at me.  Luckily our tester was too busy playing with Lego to notice, so I hastily began frying. Matters improved. The bacon-not-bacon sizzled, the dank odor lessened and I got wafts of real bacon. Our tester wandered over. He looked hesitant. “What are those bubbles?” he asked. I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. Calamity averted, he sat down. I served Jay with a plate of fungi masquerading as bacon. “What’s this?” he said, looking skeptical as he tentatively chewed the edge of one slice. “Bacon,” I lied. He frowned. Sensing disaster, I abandoned methodological integrity and offered him tomato ketchup. Too late. Jay piled up the neatly sliced pieces of bacon and deposited them on my place. To my relief, he then turned his attention not to retribution but to his buttered toast. Was that it for this great emissions-reducing superfood? It seemed so… but wait! What’s this? A second tester! Eight-year-old Sam Giles was excluded from our experimental protocol because he does not like bacon. Until this morning, that is. Now he’s munching away, renewing my hope in humanity’s ability to save itself from climate catastrophe through low-carbon eating. “I don’t like the normal kind but I do like this one,” said Sam. “You’re the only one,” replied Jay. “It tastes like tree trunks.” I’m tempted to speculate on what this means for the future of alternative proteins, but I suspect the answer is not very much. So I’ll just say that I joined Sam and enjoyed my breakfast. Prime Roots bacon doesn’t taste much like bacon, but it’s salty and crispy and generally pretty good. I’ll eat it again. Pull Quote I had no good explanation for why his breakfast was sitting in a pool of yellow froth, so I opted for misdirection and reminded him that he was getting a side of toast. Topics Food Systems Alternative Protein Featured Column Foodstuff Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A taste test of a new product from Berkeley-based startup Prime Roots. Close Authorship

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Bringing home the bacon: A kindergartner tests the future of food

COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning

May 14, 2020 by  
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COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning Heather Clancy Thu, 05/14/2020 – 03:28 Proponents of 3D printing technology and digital manufacturing solutions have been seeking their breakthrough moment for years. It took mere weeks to showcase their potential as enablers of flexible supply chains — capable of decentralizing worldwide production and responding to violent, unforeseen disruption. Every day, there is news of some inspirational pivot that points toward the future possibilities for creating far more sustainable supply chains. The most vivid illustration, of course, is the literally hundreds of companies diverting at least some portion of their production capacity to creating urgently needed supplies for the medical community. It’s part altruism, part capitalism. Just a few examples: 3D printing provider HP Inc. and its network of customers and partners has so far “printed” more than 1.5 million parts for front-line healthcare workers — components for face shields and PAPR hoods. Digital manufacturing specialist Fictiv has mobilized its network to produce batches of 10,000 shields daily with lead times of as little as 24 hours.  Another player, Carbon , teamed up with Resolution Medical and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston to design and start producing nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 in just three weeks. The partnership is producing hundreds of thousands of swabs every week using Carbon’s M2 printers. Markforged , which makes metal and carbon fiber 3D printers, is part of a similar collaboration driven by several hospitals and research institutions in San Diego. With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization … “With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization, including in the way products are designed and made to rely less on centralized production and mass production,” noted Carbon CEO Ellen Kullman, in response to questions I sent her for this article. A similar sentiment was shared by Ramon Pastor, interim president of 3D printing and digital manufacturing at HP, also via email: “Many companies look to digital manufacturing service providers to help speed development of new products, shorten time to market, create leaner supply chains and reduce their carbon footprint.” The global 3D printing market was worth about $12 billion in 2019, with a compound annual growth rate of 14 percent predicted from 2020 to 2027. One of HP’s high-profile customers is Volkswagen, which is using its technology in the design of electric vehicles. VW aims to produce more than 22 million EVs worldwide by 2028. The pandemic is proving to be what Sean Manzanares, senior manager of business strategy and marketing for Autodesk, describes as an “unfortunate catalyst” that is accelerating corporate evaluations of alternative, more sustainable production methods. (To sate that interest, the software company is offering free access to the commercial versions of its cloud-hosted design applications through June 30.) Autodesk is putting considerable muscle behind demonstrative facilities that help companies explore the potential of 3D printing and localized manufacturing, such as the Generative Design Field Lab that is part of the 100,000-square-foot MxD innovation center in Chicago. Autodesk doesn’t make the hardware; it has added artificial intelligence to many of its applications to make “push-button” manufacturing simpler. One company exploring how these technologies could support its sustainability initiatives is IKEA, which has been examining how it might use reclaimed furniture scraps to create new products that combine wood and an emerging form of “sustainable power” from Arkema, which makes resins for 3D printers, Manzanares said. The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options. Dave Evans, founder and CEO of Fictiv and a former Ford engineer, said the pandemic has helped underscore the notion that digital manufacturing networks — ones that allow organizations to be more agile when it comes to sourcing — will be key to ensuring resilience in the long term, as disruptions brought on by climate change become more frequent. The seven-year-old company just logged its best first quarter. One ongoing dialogue within Fictiv is the role of design in moving toward a more circular, agile economy — one in which products can be repaired and serviced far more easily. The company’s gift to employees last Christmas: the 2002 book ” Cradle to Cradle ,” which it hopes will spur innovation from the bottom up. “The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options,” Evans observed. “If you can show someone a [total cost of ownership] or landed cost, you can show them the emissions of hyperlocal versus some different view. Our role isn’t to push sustainability, but it’s to give them a better choice. If you can do that, you’re enabling leaders to make both better business decisions and better environmental decisions.” This article first appeared in GreenBiz’s weekly newsletter, VERGE Weekly, running Wednesdays. Subscribe  here . Follow me on Twitter:@greentechlady. Pull Quote With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization … The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options. Topics COVID-19 Supply Chain Innovation Technology 3D Printing Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A piece of manufacturing machine from Fictiv’s digitally connected network. Fictiv Close Authorship

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COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning

Fatbergs: A Sewer Menace You Might Be Helping Create

August 23, 2017 by  
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My mom’s words rang in my ears: “Don’t pour grease down the drain!” But I was in college and had no idea what else to do with the bacon grease. It was only like a tablespoon, I rationalized, so down the drain it went with some hot water….

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Fatbergs: A Sewer Menace You Might Be Helping Create

Bacon causes cancer, according to the WHO

October 26, 2015 by  
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The World Health Organization just officially declared that bacon, hot dogs, and other preserved meats cause cancer. 22 international experts reviewed over 800 studies to produce the new report, which classifies processed meats alongside other known carcinogens such as cigarettes, alcohol, asbestos and arsenic. The report is expected to receive vigorous backlash from the United States beef industry, which brings in $95 billion each year. Read the rest of Bacon causes cancer, according to the WHO

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Bacon causes cancer, according to the WHO

British Artist Laura Bacon Weaves Willow Branches Into Powerful Sculptures

May 8, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of British Artist Laura Bacon Weaves Willow Branches Into Powerful Sculptures Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Botanical , british art , green materials , Laura Bacon , recycling / compost , sculptures , site-specific , waving , willow        

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British Artist Laura Bacon Weaves Willow Branches Into Powerful Sculptures

Perkins + Will Unveils Green-Roofed LEED Silver Instructional Centre for the University of Toronto

May 8, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Perkins + Will Unveils Green-Roofed LEED Silver Instructional Centre for the University of Toronto Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , green roof campus , Hazel McCallion Academic Learning Center , LEED silver campus , perkins + will , sustainable design , University of Toronto Instructional Centre , University of Toronto Mississauga        

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Perkins + Will Unveils Green-Roofed LEED Silver Instructional Centre for the University of Toronto

3D-Printed ‘Vegan’ Bacon Mobius Strip Takes Fake Meat to Infinity and Beyond

November 5, 2012 by  
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Behold the 3-D printed Bacon Mobius Strip , a Kosher and vegan-friendly strip of fake meat that twists around itself without beginning or end. Truly, it is a marvel of modern technology. The design by Joaquin Baldwin is available for purchase online for $19.00 and it’s the perfect gift for the tech geeks on your Christmas list. Sadly, this model of porcine perfection is not edible.  + Joaquin Baldwin Via Shapeways Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed , 3d printed food , 3D printing , bacon , bacon mobius strip , green design , joaquin baldwin , joauquin baldwin , mobius strip , pork , sustainable design , sustainable food , the bacon mobius strip , vegan bacon , vegetarian

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3D-Printed ‘Vegan’ Bacon Mobius Strip Takes Fake Meat to Infinity and Beyond

Nakai House is a $25,000 Design Build Bluff Home Made from Recycled Materials in Utah

November 5, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Nakai House is a $25,000 Design Build Bluff Home Made from Recycled Materials in Utah Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bluff , dbb , design build bluff , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , native american , navajo nation , Recycled Materials , Small home , small space living , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , tiny home , university of colorado at denver , Utah

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Nakai House is a $25,000 Design Build Bluff Home Made from Recycled Materials in Utah

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