Baboons use a barrel to escape biomedical research institute in Texas

April 18, 2018 by  
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Baboons  escaped a biomedical research facility over the weekend with the help of a 55-gallon barrel. Gizmodo reported  that one clever baboon figured out how to turn a barrel upright and use it to climb fencing. Three others followed and the group hit the road, although one returned on its own — but sadly, their freedom didn’t last long. Baboons hit the road after escaping from a Texas Biomedical Research Institute (TBRI) facility. Inward-leaning walls on their open-air enclosure (seen in the video above) have kept animals from leaving in the past 35 or so years, but that didn’t stop these primates . According to the institute’s statement , the animals rolled the barrel to an upright position to ultimately jump out of the enclosure. An animal capture team, wearing protective masks and suits, captured the three animals who did leave around 20-30 minutes after. Two baboons were held to the tree line, but one made it to a nearby street. ABC News shared a video on Twitter of members of the team chasing one of the baboons on a Texas highway. Four baboons escaped their enclosure at a San Antonio biomedical research facility Saturday. A woman then spotted one leading researchers on a wild foot chase down a Texas highway. All of the baboons were safely returned according to a statement. https://t.co/sA148VbSDd pic.twitter.com/pPBW4V5ZIu — ABC News (@ABC) April 15, 2018 Related: Scientists in China have successfully cloned monkeys There are over 2,500 animals at the institute’s campus; almost 1,100 are baboons. These four escapees were part of a group of 133 males, according to HuffPost , that aren’t currently being used for testing. TBRI assistant vice president for communications Lisa Cruz said in the institute’s statement baboons “have played an important role in the discovery of life-saving drugs, therapies, and vaccines and have led to greater understanding of chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and so much more that impact the lives of millions of people.” The barrels, introduced in the enclosure just six to eight months ago, were what TBRI calls enrichment tools, and they’ve been removed. TBRI reported the returned baboons are doing well, but not everyone on social media thinks the baboons should have had to go back to the institute. People on Twitter called for the primates to find a new home in an animal sanctuary . This is heartbreaking. 4 baboons worked together to roll a 55 gallon barrel and escape the research facility where they were subject to horrifying medical experiments. They earned their freedom. Let them go to a sanctuary. Some animals are too sentient to be subjected to this. https://t.co/pWiykNdAW8 — Eugene Gu, MD (@eugenegu) April 17, 2018 Four baboons planned their escape from your facility and escaped by positioning a 55 pound barrel so they could climb out. What does that tell you about your facility? You make me sick @txbiomed – have the decency to send them to a sanctuary. https://t.co/jRhD9xjG2L — Yashar Ali ? (@yashar) April 17, 2018 + Texas Biomedical Research Institute Via Gizmodo and HuffPost Image © Clem Spalding Photography (210) 271-7273, courtesy of Texas Biomed

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Baboons use a barrel to escape biomedical research institute in Texas

Couple restores 1969 camper into chic vacation home on wheels

April 18, 2018 by  
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When couple Matt and Beau saw a friend’s DIY camper restoration , they got inspired, and they decided to take on the same task themselves. Amazingly, it took the ambitious couple just 3 months and $10,000 to breathe new life into a run-down 1969 Globestar camper, which they lovingly renamed Rosie . The result is a beautifully hand-crafted living space that retains the original charm of the old camper while providing a sophisticated home on wheels . With a little help from some crafty friends, the determined duo worked on the challenging DIY project themselves, posting detailed tutorials on their blog, Probably This, along the way. Restoring the old camper wasn’t an easy feat, but the guys learned a lot: “We learned more than we thought we could ever know about 60’s era automobile construction, concrete mixing, bed-building, light hardwiring, shelving, painting-sealing-and-re-sealing, and appropriate methods of begging friends and family for help.” Related: How this photographer escaped the grid with her tiny Teardrop Trailer The camper renovation began by giving the camper’s old exterior a complete makeover. With help from an artist friend, Faye Kaucher Bell , they converted the old rust- and cream-colored facade into a Southwest-inspired color palette, complete with Rosie’s name on the back end. For the interior, the project began with replacing the old peel-and-stick tiled flooring with tiny wooden triangles made out of reclaimed cypress . Next up were the living space and the sleeping quarters: Matt and Beau gutted all of the old built-in furniture and created their own. A complete twin-size bed frame replaced the former bunk/sofa area, and they also installed a built-in night stand. For the kitchen space, the guys kept it simple by repainting the old cupboards and adding a hex tile backsplash and brass knobs. However, they did embark on a massive DIY project for the countertops, which they refinished with a concrete overlay themselves. In the dining area, they painted the dinette table and bench bases a cream color and  reupholstered the seat cushions with a neutral fabric. They even cut out a custom-made sleeping nook for their sweet dog, Fox. As for the rest of the home, the guys filled it with their own decorations and trinkets, including a rose-print wallpaper that pays homage to Rosie’s new makeover. + Probably This Via Dwell Images via Probably This

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Couple restores 1969 camper into chic vacation home on wheels

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