LAVA unveils greenery-infused Garden Island to revamp Sydney Harbour

October 20, 2017 by  
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Australia-based firm LAVA just unveiled a stunning proposal for converting an inaccessible plot of land near Sydney Harbour into a sustainable waterfront community. The ambitious Garden Island proposal envisions a vibrant green public space with eco-friendly residential towers and multi-use buildings that would host activities throughout the year. Although the area is currently used by the Royal Australian Navy, the proposal hopes to completely overhaul the area in order to convert it into a new waterfront community. Using a sustainable model , a breezy cityscape would be built along the existing coastline that would include residential and multi-use buildings operating with green technology. The various towers, which would offer stunning views of the harbor, would all be installed with plenty of rooftop terraces and surrounded by public gardens . Related: LAVA’s Winning Design for Masdar’s City Center LAVA’s proposal also includes implementing various adaptive reuse methods where possible. For example, a former dry dock would be converted into a floating market that would have room for public baths, shopping, and performance spaces. The development would also install a number of amenities throughout renovated space such as a waterfront promenade, museums, and various social facilities that would aim to foster a strong sense of community. + LAVA Images via LAVA

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LAVA unveils greenery-infused Garden Island to revamp Sydney Harbour

This company wants to turn food waste into building materials heres how

October 20, 2017 by  
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What do peanuts, rice, bananas, potatoes, and mushrooms have in common? In addition to being delicious, they could be transformed into building materials. In a report entitled The Urban Bio-Loop , the Arup group proposes to use food waste (something developed nations have an abundance of) to develop low-cost and eco-friendly materials for use in construction. The authors of the report aim to demonstrate ‘that a different paradigm for materials in construction is possible.” Because first-world nations, such as the United States , waste up to 40 percent of all food , the goal is to turn the waste into a resource for the creation of “construction, engineering, and architecture products,” reports Archinect . This could be done by modifying the traditional waste management system. Discarded organic materials that could prove useful include peanut shells, which could be used to create low-cost partition boards that are resistant to fire and ice; rice , which could be turned into ash and mixed with cement to eliminate the need for fillers; bananas, a fruit whose leaves can make rugged textiles as a result of high-strength fibers; mushrooms, which can be used to grow buildings ; and potato peels, which can be cleaned, pressed and dried to produce a light, fire-resistant and water-repellent insulating material. The group argues that using food waste for building would contribute to a circular economy where organic waste is put to use, rather than tossed into landfills . Repurposing food waste would also reduce the amount of methane that is produced when fruit and vegetable scraps slowly decompose. The gas contributes to global warming , a phenomenon which results in warming temperatures, rising sea levels, and worsening natural disasters. Related: The free grocery store fighting food waste and hunger Arup’s goal is to ameliorate rising levels of waste and a shortage of raw material. Using the low-cost, low-carbon materials would go a long way towards this goal. + “ The Urban Bio-Loop” Via Archinect Images via Wikipedia , Arup Group

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This company wants to turn food waste into building materials heres how

Reflective arrow-shaped studio is a futuristic space for displaying art

June 15, 2017 by  
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When Mr. White retired, he had an unusual building request: he wanted a studio where he could work and display his art that had few windows but provided plenty of natural light – all while enhancing his garden. The result looks like a futuristic space dwelling fell out of the sky and into Victoria. Australian architects Nervegna Reed Architecture and PH Architects teamed up to create the Arrow Studio, a private art gallery that provides a secure space for a local art connoisseur to safely display his private collection. Located in the outskirts of Hanging Rock, Victoria, the small art gallery was created for an art collector who wanted to securely display his private collection and have room for a studio space. The client requested that the structure have minimal windows for not only security reasons, but also to create sufficient wall space to hang the artwork. He also requested that the few windows that were installed be framed in such a way that would impede intruders from breaking in. Related: Century-old packing shed brought back to life as a contemporary art gallery According to the architects, these specific criteria led them to create a unique arrow-shaped design by starting with a rectangular volume whose interior was pushed inwards from one end, jutting out from the other. Curiously, this shape allowed the designers take advantage of the arrow’s indentation to create a formidable timber-slated screen that provides security as well as subtle natural light for the interior. The jutted screen also provides nice lighting for entertaining in the backyard area, beautifully illuminating the surrounding green space. The architects used plywood to create the structure’s frame, which as then coverd with large sheets of galvanized metal. This cladding provides the building with a second skin to properly insulate the structure and the artwork from harsh weather. The metal sheeting also gave the structure a fun reflective exterior that adds to the whimsical character of the building. + Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Architects Via Arch Daily Photography by Sam Reed and Toby Reed

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Reflective arrow-shaped studio is a futuristic space for displaying art

Australian beachfront Willow Home boasts solar panels and rainwater collection

February 8, 2016 by  
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Energy efficient Cut Paw Paw house is “ridiculously inside-out” in Australia

January 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Energy efficient Cut Paw Paw house is “ridiculously inside-out” in Australia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Andrew Maynard Architects , australia , australian architecture , collarbone profile , Cut Paw Paw , Cut Paw Paw home , double glazing , glass infill , passive solar gain , studio , Trombe Wall , victoria , white roof

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Energy efficient Cut Paw Paw house is “ridiculously inside-out” in Australia

Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage

January 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: affordable design , bamboo , green architecture , H&P Architects , low cost architecture , rainwater , rainwater harvesting , restroom resign , reused materials , reused pipes , rural architecture , Vietnam

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Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage

Cape Schanck House Boasts Sweeping Views of the Australian Dune Landscape

November 5, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Cape Schanck House Boasts Sweeping Views of the Australian Dune Landscape Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , australia , australian architecture , Cape Schanck House , coastal dune landscape , jackson clements burrows , rainwater collection tanks , spotted gum hardwood , sunshades , wood-clad home

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Zaha Hadid Architects Unveil Trio of “Blossoming” Residential Towers on Brisbane Riverfront

September 10, 2014 by  
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Zaha Hadid Architects recently revealed designs for Grace on Coronation, a trio of neo-futuristic residential towers to be developed by the Sunland Group. Located along the Toowong riverbank just a few miles west of Brisbane , the $420 million residential project will comprise 486 apartments with eight riverfront villas, 635 car parks, and 78,500 square feet of landscaped public parklands. Read the rest of Zaha Hadid Architects Unveil Trio of “Blossoming” Residential Towers on Brisbane Riverfront Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: australia , australian architecture , brisbane , grace on coronation , neo-futuristic architecture , residential towers , sahba abedian , sunland group , toowong , zaha hadid , Zaha Hadid Architects

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March Studio Suspends over 2,000 ‘Flying’ Pieces of Reclaimed Wood in Canberra’s Ultra Green Nishi Building

March 3, 2014 by  
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March Studio Suspends over 2,000 ‘Flying’ Pieces of Reclaimed Wood in Canberra’s Ultra Green Nishi Building

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