Harvard scientists claim they’ve made Earth’s first metallic hydrogen

January 27, 2017 by  
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For 80 long years, scientists have attempted in vain to produce a metal from hydrogen . A super substance thought to be present on other planets , metallic hydrogen could generate a rocket propellant around four times more powerful than what we possess now, allowing us to make advanced technologies like super-fast computers. Now two scientists at Harvard University say they have achieved the near miraculous. But other scientists are skeptical – the sensational discovery may just be too good to be true. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qitm5fteL0 Ranga Dias and Isaac Silvera of Harvard University say they’ve been able to create metallic hydrogen in the laboratory by squeezing hydrogen between diamonds inside a cryostat, at a pressure even greater than that at the Earth’s center. The journal Science published their astonishing findings this week. In a Harvard press release, Silvera said, “This is the Holy Grail of high-pressure physics . It’s the first-ever sample of metallic hydrogen on Earth, so when you’re looking at it, you’re looking at something that’s never existed before.” Related: MIT’s new carbon-free supercapacitor could revolutionize the way we store power But other scientists aren’t so sure. A string of failed tries, from scientists around the world, precede the Harvard news. One physicist from France’s Atomic Energy Commission even said, “I don’t think the paper is convincing at all.” The Harvard scientists maintain they were able to polish the diamonds better, to remove any potentially damaging irregularities, and were able to crush the hydrogen gas at pressures greater than others have. Silvera said they produced a “lustry, reflective sample, which you can only believe is a metal .” But that shiny substance could be nothing more than alumina (aluminium oxide), according to geophysicist Alexander Goncharov from the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. That material coats the diamonds’ tips, and could act differently under the pressure. Silvera said they wanted to break the news before starting confirmation tests, which could ruin their sample. Now that their paper is out, they plan to perform more experiments. Stay tuned. Via Scientific American and The Independent Images via screenshot and Isaac Silvera/Harvard University

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Harvard scientists claim they’ve made Earth’s first metallic hydrogen

Futuristic green city design runs like a real rainforest in Malaysia

January 27, 2017 by  
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If money were no object, what would the ideal city of the future look like? Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA) answered that question with a spectacular design for the Forest City, a proposed masterplan for a new city in Malaysia. This 20-square-kilometer green smart city would be built around a central rainforest and mimic the forest’s ecosystem by adopting a closed loop system that reuses all its resources and controls out-flow. Winner of the second place prize in an international design competition , the Forest City was created for a 24-hectare site and judged on its efficiency of land use, sensitivity to the environment, and inclusion of a landmark building that embodied the notion of a forest city. “Skylines across the world look the same—usually a couple of iconic towers in the center surrounded by lots of lesser quality buildings, which all resemble each other,” said Chris Bosse, director of LAVA. “Here we have designed an inverse city skyline where the icon of the city is a public space, not an object/building. Our central space is a Rainforest Valley and demonstrates the equation: PEOPLE = CITY. From an object to a place.” The proposed city for 700,000 people would be located on reclaimed land between Malaysia and Singapore and include office towers, residential areas, parks, hotels, shopping malls, and an international school. The city is organized around a central public space, the Rainforest Valley, which is surrounded by a waterfall and serves as a visual reminder of the city as a three-dimensional ecosystem. The valley extends like fingers in five directions to represent the five elements—wood, fire, earth, metal, and water—as well as the five pillars of sustainability. Related: LAVA’s Addis Ababa Football Stadium Celebrates Ethiopia’s Ancient Heritage A group of buildings step down towards the green park and are heavily landscaped with roof gardens . A Landmark Tower will house the serviced apartments, hotels, retail and commercial space. As a pedestrian-friendly development, the design separates the circulation types by directing vehicular traffic underground and placing trains on a level above pedestrian walkways. Like a rainforest, the city will be designed as a mostly closed loop system with recycling processes hidden underground and outflow minimized. Local materials would be used in construction and energy generated from renewable sources. + Laboratory for Visionary Architecture

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Futuristic green city design runs like a real rainforest in Malaysia

Timber ‘prosthesis’ gives Mexican tiny apartment more flexibility

January 27, 2017 by  
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Supportive scaffolding typically comes down after a construction project is complete, but MANADA Architectural Boundaries has used the wooden “prosthesis” to add flexibility to a tiny apartment in Mexico City. The wooden skeleton is interwoven throughout the interior, creating a second level loft space and extending out to the patio, where its serves as the frame for a vertical garden . The apartment, located in La Condesa neighborhood of Mexico City, has a layout typical to the area, with double-height ceilings, a simple interior, and a strong connection to nature. Updating the space was essential, but not at the cost of losing its original character. Related: MVRDV’s massive staircase made of scaffolding opens in Rotterdam According to the architects, the concept behind “Essay 4 Spatial Prosthesis” was inspired by artificial prostheses that are designed to “correct a damaged organ’s function; second, to extend an organ’s inherent capability.” Using this as the inspiration for the apartment’s renovation, the architects choose the wooden skeleton structure to provide a second floor loft space. In addition to providing another level to the home, the wooden “prosthesis” is strategically integrated throughout the space, creating new sitting nooks and functional space where possible. Continuing out into the apartment’s open-air patio, the structure serves as a light and airy frame for a lovely vertical garden . + MANADA Architectural Boundaries Via Archdaily Photographs by Jaime Navarro

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Timber ‘prosthesis’ gives Mexican tiny apartment more flexibility

Japan restarts second nuclear reactor since Fukushima disaster amid public disapproval

October 16, 2015 by  
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Some people in Japan are freaking out this week as the country restarts its second nuclear reactor since the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in 2011. The aptly named Number Two Reactor at Sendai is back in business for the first time, as protesters gathered outside the power plant. Despite the unrest, government officials are pressing forward with plans to return Japan to a nuclear-powered nation, largely due to the low financial cost. The people of Japan, rightly, are concerned about the other costs tied to the deadly energy source. Read the rest of Japan restarts second nuclear reactor since Fukushima disaster amid public disapproval

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Japan restarts second nuclear reactor since Fukushima disaster amid public disapproval

13-Year-Old Jamie Edwards Becomes the World’s Youngest Person to Achieve Nuclear Fusion

March 6, 2014 by  
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A 13-year-old boy from Preston, UK has become the world’s youngest nuclear fusioneer. By successfully carrying out an atomic fusion , Jamie Edwards has set a new record previously held by then 14-year-old US schoolboy, Taylor Wilson, who built a nuclear reactor in his parents’ garage. Read the rest of 13-Year-Old Jamie Edwards Becomes the World’s Youngest Person to Achieve Nuclear Fusion Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: atomic energy , Farnsworth Fusor , Geiger counters , green technology , Jamie Edwards nuclear reactor , nuclear energy , nuclear fusion , schoolboy nuclear fusion , UK school nuclear project , UK school science        

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13-Year-Old Jamie Edwards Becomes the World’s Youngest Person to Achieve Nuclear Fusion

Cleaning Up The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Could Take Over 40 Years

April 24, 2013 by  
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A team from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recently announced that Japan may need more than 40 years to decommission the Fukushima power plant . The head of the IAEA clean up team, Juan Carlos Lentijo, said that the damage at the nuclear plant is so complex that it is impossible to predict how long the cleanup may last, and he has urged Japanese nuclear provider TEPCO to improve stability at the facility . Read the rest of Cleaning Up The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Could Take Over 40 Years Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Fukushima , fukushima clean up , fukushima nuclear disaster , IAEA , International Atomic Energy Agency , Japan , nuclear disaster , nuclear energy        

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Cleaning Up The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Could Take Over 40 Years

18-Year-Old Nuclear Scientist Unveils Plans for More Efficient, Transportable Nuclear Reactors

February 28, 2013 by  
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Taylor Wilson is an 18-year-old scientist who built a nuclear fusion reactor in his parent’s garage at the age of 14 – and he just unveiled his work on a new modular nuclear fission reactor that could be more efficient than existing nuclear plants. After speaking last year about his first experiences with nuclear power, Taylor returned to TED2013 to talk about his new project. Read the rest of 18-Year-Old Nuclear Scientist Unveils Plans for More Efficient, Transportable Nuclear Reactors Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: atomic energy , modular nuclear fission reactors , nuclear power , nuclear power research , nuclear safety , nuclear weapons smuggling , Taylor Wilson , Taylor Wilson Neutron Detectors , Taylor Wilson nuclear scientist , TED 2012 conference , transportable nuclear reactors , US teenage nuclear scientist

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18-Year-Old Nuclear Scientist Unveils Plans for More Efficient, Transportable Nuclear Reactors

Land Rover Gives the Classic Defender an Electric Motor for the Geneva Auto Show

February 28, 2013 by  
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The Land Rover Defender is a classic vehicle that is known all over the world for its off-road capabilities — and Land Rover just announced that it is hard at work on an electric-hybrid powertrain for the iconic vehicle. Land Rover plans to unveil seven new electrified versions of the current Defender at the Geneva Motor Show , which kicks off next week. Read the rest of Land Rover Gives the Classic Defender an Electric Motor for the Geneva Auto Show Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2013 Geneva Motor Show , electric Land Rover , electric motor , electric SUV , Geneva Motor Show , green SUV , green transportation , Land Rover , Land Rover Defender , lithium ion battery

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Land Rover Gives the Classic Defender an Electric Motor for the Geneva Auto Show

Ubiquitous Energy Developing Transparent Stick-On Solar Cells that Can Power Your iPad

February 28, 2013 by  
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Tablet photo from Shutterstock Portable gadgets, like smartphones and tablets, have changed the way we consume information and communicate, but at this stage they all have one common flaw: they need to be tethered to the wall for a few hours to recharge their batteries. From portable solar panels to kinetic energy harvesting, we’ve seen several clever ideas aimed at generating energy on the go, but a new startup called Ubiquitious Energy promises to revolutionize the way we power our mobile devices. The company plans to develop see-through solar cells that can be installed on top of tablet screens, keeping your iPad running all day long. Read the rest of Ubiquitous Energy Developing Transparent Stick-On Solar Cells that Can Power Your iPad Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , apple , iPad , MIT , portable electronics , portable gadgets , portable solar , see-through solar , solar iPad , Solar Power , solar powered gadgets , solar-powered tablets , tablet , transparent solar cells , ubiquitous energy

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Ubiquitous Energy Developing Transparent Stick-On Solar Cells that Can Power Your iPad

Japan to Shut Down Last Operating Nuclear Reactor on May 6th

April 17, 2012 by  
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Nuclear Power Station image from Shutterstock For the first time in a generation, Japan is set to go nuclear-free next month . Nuclear energy has suffered a serious blow to its public image since the March 2011 disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant , and Japanese authorities have been cautious about restarting idled nuclear plants. Over the weekend, Japan’s Trade Minister Yukio Edano indicated that on May 6 the last operating nuclear reactor in the country is set to be taken offline, meaning that for the first time since 1970, Japan will be getting zero energy from nuclear power plants. Read the rest of Japan to Shut Down Last Operating Nuclear Reactor on May 6th Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , atomic energy , earthquake , fossil fuels , Fukushima , fukushima daiichi , Japan , nuclear disaster , nuclear meltdown , nuclear power , nuclear reactor , power plant , tsunami

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Japan to Shut Down Last Operating Nuclear Reactor on May 6th

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