Want to win $20 million? Recycle your carbon

July 1, 2016 by  
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“Instead of letting CO2 go up into the atmosphere and cause climate change, could you capture that and use it? Could you turn it into something?” That is the $20 million question according to Paul Bunje, head of energy and environment at XPRIZE Foundation.

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Want to win $20 million? Recycle your carbon

Stanford engineers develop a Star Trek-style tricorder to detect early stage cancer

November 10, 2015 by  
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Science fiction television shows like Star Trek made popular the tricorder concept—a handheld device that can scan a person, object, or atmosphere and report on its health or makeup. Now, a team of Stanford electrical engineers have taken a giant leap for mankind toward a real device that can do just that. The team’s research theorizes that microwaves and ultrasound working together in a portable device could be capable of detecting hidden objects , be they plastic explosives or deadly tumors. Read the rest of Stanford engineers develop a Star Trek-style tricorder to detect early stage cancer

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Stanford engineers develop a Star Trek-style tricorder to detect early stage cancer

Scientists Make CO2-Capturing, BPA-Free Plastic

June 2, 2010 by  
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Here’s a neat discovery that solves two problems at once:  scientists have identified classes of organic chemicals that can capture CO2 from the atmosphere and then be used to make safe ( BPA -free) plastics. BPA, a chemical with a growing list of health concerns, is commonly used in rigid polycarbonate plastics (about 2.7 million tons are made every year).  Researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore have found a way to make a BPA-free polycarbonate plastic through a process using chemicals called imidazoliums and N-heterocyclic carbenes that “grab” CO2 molecules and bond them with epoxide molecules. The process removes CO2 from the atmosphere and makes a safe form of plastic for drinking bottles, CDs and other typical BPA-laced containers.  If that weren’t enough, this process also gets rid of the need for petroleum in the manufacture of plastics, which would reduce the material’s carbon footprint even further.

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Scientists Make CO2-Capturing, BPA-Free Plastic

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