Amazing Dutch Windwheel is a green energy generator you can live in

June 29, 2017 by  
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The iconic Dutch windmill is getting a high-tech makeover with a big eco-friendly boost. Windwheel Corporation unveiled today their new designs for the Dutch Windwheel, a circular building set on the water that harnesses clean energy and houses private residences as well as public venues. Created for Rotterdam, the futuristic Dutch Windwheel aims to transform the city skyline and provide an eye-catching landmark that’ll serve as the new benchmark for healthy, sustainable design. First unveiled in mid-2015, the Dutch Windwheel 2.0 fleshes out the project’s programmatic functions, circulation patterns, and energy systems in more detail. Windwheel Corporation worked with a team of innovators, including Arup , Royal BAM Groep, Deltares, and others, to develop the project. A Green Deal was also signed today at Rotterdam’s World Trade Center by Minister Kamp, Provincial Executive member Bom-Lemstra (province of Zuid-Holland) and Alderman Struijvenberg (municipality Rotterdam) to increase the project’s chances of realization. The innovative Dutch Windwheel comprises apartments, a hotel , a space for short-stay housing, commercial and cultural space, a cruise terminal, and a sky lobby with a restaurant at the top of the building. Similar to a Ferris wheel , the Windwheel will be equipped with mobile cabins that transport visitors to the highest point of the structure. Certain cabins will have special features, such as the Bar cabin with food and drinks, the Relax cabin for yoga and relaxation, and even a cabin that goes underwater for up-close views of aquatic life. Elevators and stairs will also be installed. Related: The Dutch Windwheel is not only a silent wind turbine – it’s also an incredible circular apartment building The disk-like building will be built with locally sourced materials and wrapped in a smart plant-covered skin that reflects unwanted solar heat gain while letting in natural light and ventilation. Rainwater will be captured and reused throughout the building. Artificial wetlands provide water filtration and habitat. The facade will be integrated with solar panels and wind energy will also be harnessed. Organic waste will be collected for biogas production. + Dutch Windwheel Images by DoepelStrijkers

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The prefab house of the future is made from recycled, reusable, and sustainable materials

May 5, 2017 by  
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This prefab home by Arup Associates is made from recycled, reusable and sustainably sourced materials . The Circular Economy Building was designed as a prototype for this year’s London Design Festival and built in only two weeks. The project revisits the archetypal house and reinvents it with refined prefab construction techniques and sustainable materials. The prefab clearly show its Circular Economy elements by revealing them visually– visitors can observe the layers of the envelope – including the demountable SIPS panels and the structural steel frame , which creates enables extension and future adaptation. The design aims to demonstrate that flexible, sustainable architecture can be highly compatible with a comfortable modern lifestyle. Related: Arup’s timber prefab Sky Believe in Better Building wins the 2014 Wood in Architecture Award The architects worked closely with Arup’s engineers to marry pleasant spatial solutions with sustainable building techniques. This informed the choice of finishes and fittings throughout the interior. Even the carpets, supplied by Desso on a take-back scheme, can be replaced when worn out and sustainably refurbished and reused . Related: London’s new Design Museum opens this week inside a renovated post-war modernist building The building’s superior acoustic performance is ensured by using an acoustic wall system built entirely from recycled plastic bottles . A high-tech automation system uses sensors to monitor the interior environment and adjust the skylights , blinds and lights. The building’s flat-pack construction utilizes custom-made panels standardized through several computational iterations. + Arup Associates Via v2com Photos by Simon Kennedy

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The prefab house of the future is made from recycled, reusable, and sustainable materials

Nissan is working on a new 340-mile-range electric car

May 5, 2017 by  
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Nissan basically put the electric car on the map when it introduced the Nissan Leaf, but in the last few years the Leaf has been overshadowed by the arrival of newer electric cars, like the Tesla Model S and most recently, the Chevy Bolt. The good news is that Nissan is close to releasing an all-new Nissan Leaf, which will be followed by another electric car with a driving range of around 340 miles. According to Japan’s Nikkei Automotive , the next Leaf will get a 43-percent better driving range, which will put it around 150 miles per charge. If that figure holds, the new Leaf will be able to drive further on one charge than the updated VW e-Golf, the BMW i3 and the Focus Electric. Unfortunately that driving range won’t match the Chevy Bolt or the upcoming Tesla Model 3, but Nissan has something else in the works. Related: The new Nissan Leaf will be able to drive autonomously on the highway The automaker is reportedly working on a different electric car, which will be able to travel over 340 miles on a single charge. The new electric car will arrive by 2020 and will borrow styling cues from the IDS concept picture here. The new EV’s cargo capacity and exterior dimensions will also be close to the Leaf. + Nissan Via Nikkei Automotive Images @Nissan

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Nissan is working on a new 340-mile-range electric car

Londons new Design Museum opens this week inside a renovated post-war modernist building

November 21, 2016 by  
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Topped with a sweeping paraboloid copper-clad concrete roof, the Design Museum’s new building features a double-glazed facade that was meticulously detailed with mullions and patterns to mimic the original blue exterior. The renovated facade is complemented by a new public plaza with fountains installed at the entrance and a West 8 -designed landscape. The most notable overhaul, however, is in the interior, which includes two major temporary gallery spaces, a free permanent collection display, a restaurant overlooking Holland Park, auditorium, studios, library, archive, and new learning facilities. Inside the museum, John Pawson led the redesign, ripping out the original concrete floors and laying down Italian terrazzo flooring on the basement and ground floors, while warm-toned Dinesen oak flooring was used for the upper floors. The galleries, learning spaces, cafe, events space, and shop are organized around an oak-lined central atrium that offer beautiful views up to the iconic hyperbolic paraboloid roof. The double-glazed facade and atrium let in copious amounts of natural light. At night, LEDs are used to illuminate the space. Related: Stone House Made from 99% Recycled Granite Debuts in Milan “There are ‘moments’ in the building that I relish every time I walk around, but I think it is really the way everything comes together – the new and the old – that gives me the greatest pleasure,” said John Pawson. “I hope the Design Museum shows people that you don’t have to tear down and start from scratch to make exciting new cultural spaces.” The Design Museum will open to the public on November 24, 2016 and is expected to attract 650,000 visitors in its first year. + Design Museum Images by Gareth Gardner and Gravity Road

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Londons new Design Museum opens this week inside a renovated post-war modernist building

Earthquake-resistant Torre Reforma skyscraper is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

July 22, 2016 by  
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Arup collaborated with L. Benjamin Romano Arquitects (LBRA) to design Torre Reforma’s eye-catching triangular form that rises as the second tallest building in the city. The striking appearance was achieved with pre-tensioned double-V hangers that support the glazed facade. Concrete poured in 70-centimeter increments show off striations and variations in color. To make the most of Torre Reforma’s stunning panoramic views , the architects created a column-free interior with soaring ceiling heights. The egress stairways and 35 elevators—Torre Reforma is the building with the most elevators in Latin America—are located in the corner, or “apex,” of the triangular plan. “Because Torre Reforma is triangular in plan, the building has an inherent tendency to twist when subjected to lateral loads and wind, not to mention earthquake forces,” says a press release. “Arup applied a comprehensive time-history analysis to establish the performance of the structure under extreme seismic conditions and engineered a solution that is both locally appropriate and consistent with international best-practice designs for tall buildings.” Related: Green-roofed LEED Platinum CENTRO University offers an idyllic study oasis in Mexico City Torre Reforma is expected to attain LEED Platinum Core and Shell certification. The building boasts rainwater collection as well as a graywater and blackwater recycling systems. Automated and passive ventilation moderate interior temperatures, while concrete walls shield the interior from unwanted solar gain. + Arup + L. Benjamin Romano Arquitects Images © Torre Reforma

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Earthquake-resistant Torre Reforma skyscraper is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

Architects envision carbon-sucking solar makeover for a busy L.A. freeway

July 11, 2016 by  
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Freeways don’t have to be so darn drab. Built in 1953 and expanded in 1971, the Arroyo Seco Bridge on Los Angeles ‘ 134 Freeway in Pasadena currently includes 10 traffic lanes. Its main purpose is to transport vehicles from Point A to Point B, but in the process it sends a huge amount of carbon emissions into the atmosphere and emits disruptive noise pollution. Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) and Arup Los Angeles designed a fix for the bridge, which includes a suite of solar panels and pile of carbon-sponging concrete. Their design transforms the bridge into a type of above-ground tunnel that MMA calls a ” new infrastructural overlay .” Drivers would still be able to see through the tunnel, but elements like “acoustically insulated walls” and “porous concrete ‘lungs'” would dramatically slash pollution . Arup estimates the insulated walls would cut noise by 65 percent, and the ‘lungs’ could capture 516,000 tons yearly of carbon dioxide. On top of the tunnel solar panels would provide clean energy for 600 homes and a rainwater collection system that would both water plants on the tunnel and add to Pasadena’s water supply. Related: Los Angeles approves $28 million FAB Park designed by OMA and IDEO Not only would the green freeway offer a more sustainable means of transportation, but could generate money for the city of Pasadena. MMA says the ” cost savings ” – which would be around $1 million – could be given to local schools. The green dream won’t become reality just yet; rather, it’s a vision of how aging infrastructure could fit into a sustainable vision for the 21st century. Caltrans, Los Angeles County, and Pasadena would need to work together to build the innovative freeway, though MMA doesn’t yet have an estimate for how much it would cost. But it would clearly offer huge benefits to local residents, and MMA says the concept is ” expandable “, such that it could be easily utilized on other freeways. + Michael Maltzan Architecture + Arup Los Angeles Via the Los Angeles Times Images via Michael Maltzan Architecture

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Taiwan research institute is wrapped in an undulating skin of 4,000 aluminum fins

April 5, 2016 by  
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Winter Walk pop-up plaza returns to downtown San Francisco

December 17, 2015 by  
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Winter Walk has returned for its second year in downtown San Francisco. This pop-up plaza on Stockton Street between Geary and Ellis provides a public open space during the construction of the Central Subway. RHAA Landscape Architecture + Planning donated their services to the Union Square Business Improvement District (BID) to create a space that offers a place for respite among the busy holiday bustle. Read the rest of Winter Walk pop-up plaza returns to downtown San Francisco

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Architectural Association School of Architecture bamboo workshops in Haiti teach post-disaster construction techniques

December 17, 2015 by  
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The AA School is working with Quisqueya University , the Wynne Farm and ARUP through short workshops to design and build architectural projects contextualized for the climate of the Caribbean and the cultural vernacular of Haiti using bamboo. The country is plagued by a lack of lightweight materials in the built environment, the legacy of disastrous deforestation, and bamboo is a solution to the building supply shortage as well as the damaged ecology. Read the rest of Architectural Association School of Architecture bamboo workshops in Haiti teach post-disaster construction techniques

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Brilliant origami-like paper furniture creates portable rooms that can pop up anywhere

November 23, 2015 by  
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