Rusty shovel heads transformed into delicate lace-inspired sculptures

February 27, 2017 by  
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Artist Denise Bizot has a gift for breathing new life into an unexpected medium—rusted shovel heads. The New Orleans-based artist retrieves discarded shovel heads from salvage yards and carves beautifully intricate lace-inspired designs into the rusted surfaces. She typically keeps the oxidized patina intact for the visual contrast between the weathered object and the delicate new designs. Formerly a drafter in the petroleum industry, Bizot returned to Loyola New Orleans to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a focus on sculpture. Her interest in found objects , particularly metals, sparked her metalworking craft and love of transforming discarded junk and debris found in New Orleans into beautiful sculptures. In addition to her reworked shovel heads and other sculptures, Bizot also creates more functional pieces such as metal room dividers and handmade tables. Related: Artist sculpts lifelike grizzly bear from recycled cardboard “Like many cities undergoing gentrification , New Orleans is replete with discarded metal, miscellaneous street junk and salvage yards teeming with all sorts of debris,” writes Bizot. “For me, the idea of reclaiming, deconstructing and transforming “so-called junk” into works of sculpture is fascinating.” + Denise Bizot

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Rusty shovel heads transformed into delicate lace-inspired sculptures

NASA discovers 7 Earth-sized planets outside our solar system

February 22, 2017 by  
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In a press conference today, NASA scientists revealed an extraordinary new discovery – the first known system of seven rocky, Earth-sized planets orbiting a single star. Three out of the seven planets are situated at the perfect distance from the sun to potentially harbor liquid water , making them habitable for life as we know it. This is the largest number of habitable-zone planets ever found around a single star outside our own solar system . It’s important to note that simply because these planets could potentially hold liquid water doesn’t mean that they do – but the likelihood is higher given their location. The planets are orbiting an ultra-cool dwarf star called TRAPPIST-1, located about 40 light years (or 235 trillion miles) from Earth in the Aquarius constellation. The system is named after the TRAPPIST ( The Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope ), located in an observatory in Chile. In May 2016, TRAPPIST researchers announced they’d discovered three planets in the system. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope was able to confirm those exoplanets’ existence and that of four additional planets. The results of NASA’s study have been published in the journal Nature today. Related: Astronomers just discovered an alien planet with three suns that shouldn’t exist What’s especially interesting about the TRAPPIST-1 system is how different its habitable zone is from that of systems like our own. Because the star is much cooler than our sun, planets much closer to the sun than Earth could potentially have liquid water. In fact, all seven of TRAPPIST-1’s planets are closer to the star than Mercury is to our own sun, and each of the planets are so close to one another they would appear in one another’s skies the same way the moon appears in ours. NASA scientists also speculate the planets may be tidally locked , so that the same side of the planet is always facing the star, casting one half of the planet in permanent daylight and the other in perpetual night. This could cause weather patterns unlike anything we’ve ever seen before on Earth, and extreme differences in temperature from one side to the other. The Spitzer telescope was able to detect the presence of the planets by observing the infrared wavelengths emitted by the star over a period of 500 hours. Each time a planet crossed in front of the star, the telescope could detect changes in the star’s brightness. NASA also followed up with a study using the Hubble Space Telescope to determine whether the planets were rocky, or likely had a “puffy” atmosphere like those of our own system’s gas giants. There’s still much about these planets we simply do not know, but studies will continue to help NASA learn more about them. Right now, the Kepler space telescope is also recording observations about the system, which will reveal more properties about the exoplanets in March. NASA’s new James Webb Telescope will also be pointed toward TRAPPIST-1 after its launch in 2018, and will analyze the planets’ temperature, surface pressure, and atmospheric makeup – all key factors that will reveal whether these worlds can actually sustain life. Via NASA Images via NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnKFaAS30X8

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NASA discovers 7 Earth-sized planets outside our solar system

Incredible sea creature sculptures are made from dangerously sharp colored pencils

February 8, 2017 by  
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It’s always fascinating to see common objects, like pencils, used in unexpected and amazing ways— Jennifer Maestre’s art is one such example. The Massachusetts-based artist creates alien-like sea creature sculptures made from hundreds of colored pencils . Though her vibrantly colorful pieces are beautiful and attractive, many of the pencils are sharpened into dangerous needle-like points to mimic defense mechanisms found in nature. In her artist’s statement, Maestre credits the original inspiration for her art to the form and function of sea urchins . She said she was drawn to the urchin’s beautiful yet dangerous spines, as well as that tension we feel between the desire to touch and the repulsion to pain. The artist captures this feeling of push and pull in her handmade pencil sculptures that combine smooth and sharp surfaces, from the flat pencil ends and overlapped shavings to the sharpened points. Related: Federico Uribe Creates Incredible Sculptures From Thousands of Colored Pencil Tips “Paradox and surprise are integral in my choice of materials,” writes Maestre. “Quantities of industrially manufactured objects are used to create flexible forms reminiscent of the organic shapes of animals and nature . Pencils are common objects, here, these anonymous objects become the structure. There is true a fragility to the sometimes brutal aspect of the sculptures, vulnerability that is belied by the fearsome texture.” The sculptures are made from pencils cut into one-inch sections that she then drills to turn into beads. The pencils are sharpened and sewn together, often with a peyote stitch technique. + Jennifer Maestre

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Incredible sea creature sculptures are made from dangerously sharp colored pencils

Wool art installation repurposed into blankets for Syrian refugees

February 7, 2017 by  
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Although many of the exhibitions from the 2016 Amman Design Week surely left quite an impression on visitors, there is one art installation in particular whose longevity will be tangible for years to come. ENTRELAC by fiber artist Rayah Kassisieh was initially a monumental installation made up of 350 kilograms of un-dyed, handknitted wool strands that gracefully hung from the ceiling. However, once the event came to a close, the Brooklyn-based artist set out to repurpose her artwork into blankets for Syrian refugees and Jordanian families. The initial artwork consisted of enormous wool strands that represented the relationship between digital design and traditional craft. The artist used computational modeling to determine the intricate design of the strands, but the work was mainly the result of hand-crafted excellence by a team of talented seamstress es. The 28 large knit strands were cut and stitched by hand by twenty Jordanian women working from their homes or small workshops. Related: Ikea flat-pack refugee shelters awarded Design of the Year Once the event was coming to a close, the artist worked in collaboration with NADAAA ,  Boston-based architecture and urban design firm led by  designer Nader Tehrani, and the Amman Design Week team to repurpose her work into blankets. The same women who created the initial piece for the event then took on the responsibility to transform the material into 38 blankets for those in need . + Rayah Kassisieh  + NADAAA Photography by Hareth Tabbalat

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Wool art installation repurposed into blankets for Syrian refugees

Psychedelic geode-like sculptures made from molten beeswax

January 16, 2017 by  
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New York-based visual artist Laura Moriarty has an unusual use for beeswax , and it’s not for lip balm or candles. Rather, the self-taught artist dyes and melts beeswax to make brilliant geode-like sculptures. These highly pigmented beeswax artworks are so colorful and vibrant that they give off a psychedelic, Alice-in-Wonderland feel. Moriarty’s intricate sculptures express the passage of time through layers. The beeswax is repeatedly heated and cooled to create the desired shapes and patterns, a process inspired by the formation of the earth’s crust. “Taking poetic license with geology , I compare processes of the studio with processes of the earth,” writes Moriarty in her artist’s statement. “Layers of color form the strata of a methodology in which the immediacy of the hand can translate a sense of deep time. Working and reworking molten, richly pigmented beeswax, I build each painting/object through a slow, simple yet strenuous physical engagement, which often becomes a metaphor for the ephemerality of life and civilization.” Related: An army of 60,000 bees built this giant honeycomb teapot Moriarty refers to her pigmented beeswax works as ‘Sculptural Paintings,’ all of which are richly layered and inspired by geologic processes. The Sculpture Paintings are currently on display at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art in Collegeville, PA as part of the ‘ A Stratigraphic Fiction ’ exhibit through March 19, 2017. + Laura Moriarty Via Colossal Images via Laura Moriarty

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Psychedelic geode-like sculptures made from molten beeswax

Japanese paper artist replicates amazing wild animals using intricately bound newspaper

October 21, 2016 by  
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https://vimeo.com/187103775 Over the past four years, Hitotsuyama and her team have worked to create lifelike paper creatures with staggering accuracy. After wetting the newspaper, they twist, fold, squish, and roll it, and then bind it into the desired form. The artist builds paper sculptures representing everything from manatees to monkeys, including some endangered animals such as rhinoceros and sea turtles. Hitotsuyama even takes advantage of color-printed newspapers in some sculptures, using the gradations to mimic the animal’s actual coloring. Every inch of every intricately bound animal sculpture is made entirely by hand. Related: Milan artist creates remarkable handcrafted wave sculptures out of paper Each carefully sculpted paper animal takes hours upon hours to create, even with a team effort. Although the photographs of the sculptures are incredible, getting a chance to see the nearly life-size paper animals up close would certainly be an awe-inspiring way to spend an afternoon. Some of Hitotsuyama’s sculptures are currently on display at MOAH:CEDAR in Lancaster, California through January 7, 2017. It’s worth noting that paper is not a new fascination for Hitotsuyama’s family. They once operated a paper strip manufacturing plant in Fuji city in Shizuoka prefecture, southwest from Tokyo. Now, the artist’s studio is housed in a warehouse connected to that same paper plant. + Hitotsuyama Studio Via MyModernMet Images via Hitotsuyama Studio

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Japanese paper artist replicates amazing wild animals using intricately bound newspaper

NeSpoon adorns urban spaces with oversized doily art

October 4, 2016 by  
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NeSpoon’s creations have recently embellished various walls, streets and public parks around Poland , New Zealand and France. Aesthetically, they draw inspiration from traditional embroidery, yet the different creations are made using ceramic, rope or a stencil, and a spray can. The ‘urban jewelry’ can be imprinted on the wall, can take shape as an  aerial sculpture or as a doily detail on a wall. Related: NeSpoon’s Delicate Doily Art Adorns a Stretch of the Baltic’s Oak Beach Each piece is handmade by the artist herself or with the hand of traditional folk artists with whom she works. NeSpoon explains her passion for lace : “In lace there is an aesthetic code which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, and some kind of order and harmony. Isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?” + NeSpoon Via This is Colossal

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NeSpoon adorns urban spaces with oversized doily art

Artist "attacks" buildings with clutter to remind us of how much stuff we own

August 9, 2016 by  
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Torres has been working and living in Quebec for over a decade, where much of his artwork has been publicly displayed. “Tipping Point” was brought to Ottawa after the artist was invited by Canadian Heritage and EXMURO arts publics for an early July installation. Kayaks, construction cones, children’s toys, and patio chairs in bright, alarming colors seem to explode out of the side of the wall as observers pass by the piece. Related: Artist Veronika Richterová turns plastic bottles into beautiful plant and animal sculptures The piece is much like earlier works at a Quebec City event, named “Overflows” and “Stock in Transit”. The former portrays an explosion of multicolored plastic equipment bursting out of a tipped storage container, a metaphor for our disturbing reliance on accumulating as many things as we can buy. Each piece is meant to feel imposing and overwhelming, just like the western world’s love affair with “disposable” plastic objects. Most recently Torres’ “Canopy” piece was featured in Edmonton’s The Works Art & Design Festival . Visitors walked underneath and amongst exposed and covered passageways. The experience is meant to represent nomadism, a key theme in the artist’s life and creative work. +José Luis Torres Images via José Luis Torres

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Cyborg artist can sense earthquakes around the world as they are happening

May 20, 2016 by  
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Some artists play to the beat of their own drum – but Moon Ribas plays to the beat of the Earth’s constant seismic movement. A self-proclaimed “ cyborg artist,” Ribas feels the vibrations of earthquakes through a subdermal implant and expresses what she feels through a unique interpretive dance called “Waiting for Earthquakes.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Un4MFR-vNI Dubbing her vibrational sensitivities a sixth sense, Ribas interprets the planet’s moving and shaking in her own artistic way. She decided to have a small magnet implanted under her skin near her elbow, which is connected to a personalized iPhone app. The app tracks the Earth’s seismic activity by aggregating geological data from all over the world, giving her a buzz akin to a phone vibrating in her pocket whenever the device is turned on and an earthquake is rumbling. She calls the phenomenon her second heartbeat, or “Earthbeat.” Related: The mega-earthquake that will probably someday wipe Seattle off the map Ribas has a certain affinity for the Earth’s rumblings. She told Quartz , “I think it’s unfair that our perception of earthquakes are all bad. Earthquakes are part of the evolution of our planet. The bad thing is that humans haven’t adapted to this natural phenomenon.” She is considering adding more implants to fine tune the sensations and, in the end, her performance art . She explains, “Maybe I’ll use each toe to define each continent, but that’s still in process.” +Moon Ribas Via Quartz Images via Moon Ribas

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Artist sculpts lifelike grizzly bear from recycled cardboard

April 5, 2016 by  
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Artist Claudio Barake has been sculpting with recycled materials for many years. Using only discarded paper, wood, and cardboard, the artist crushes these found materials into a juice used as BioFuel and the remaining fibers are used to produce a flourless papier-mâché pulp. This solid cardboard Grizzly Bear measures 42cm in height and stands regally on a Peroba reclaimed wood base. The color, natural cardboard, is perfectly fitting for a Grizzly. + BARAKE PAPIER MACHÊ The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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