This prefab cabin is designed to take you off grid in the Scottish Highlands

March 30, 2018 by  
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A new piece of prefab architecture will soon bring artists, researchers, and travelers closer to the spectacular Scottish Highlands. Artist Bobby Niven and architect Iain MacLeod designed the Artist Bothy, a multipurpose cabin prefabricated in Scotland from sustainable materials . Conceived as an artist residency space, the gabled hut promises a low-impact and off-grid immersion in nature. The Artist Bothy was born from the Bothy Project , a network of off-grid artist residency spaces that aims to support artist mobility and access to the Scottish landscape. To withstand the elements, the 178-square-foot cabin was constructed from cross-laminated timber panels clad in Corten corrugated metal and Scottish larch. Insulated with 100 millimeters of wood-fiber insulation, the gabled structure frames views through double-glazed windows. Surface water drainage is handled by concealed downpipes. Related: Solar-powered seaside cabin blends prefab design with traditional building techniques Each Artist Bothy can be installed on site in less than a day. While the structures were envisioned for off-grid use, they can also be connected to electricity and water services. The compact interior features a mostly wooden interior and a mezzanine level for sleeping. Optional extras for added functionality include a kitchenette, bench bed, shelving units, tables, a wood-burning stove , and outer decking. The Artist Bothy is available to purchase starting from £39,000 ($54,731 USD) . + Bothy Project Images by Johnny Barrington

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This prefab cabin is designed to take you off grid in the Scottish Highlands

Palestinian architects give the ancient stone vault a modern twist in Jericho

May 4, 2017 by  
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The world’s oldest continuously inhabited city is now home to a curious new structure. AAU Anastas and Laboratoire GSA built and designed a giant stone arch in Jericho that combines ancient building materials with digital fabrication . The piece, titled Stone Matters, is the first prototype and module of the city’s el-Atlal artists and writers residency building. Echoing the region’s ancient construction techniques, Stone Matters was built as a stone vault that deviates from its predecessors with its large latticed appearance. The vault covers a surface area of 60 square meters and is made up of 300 interlocking and mutually supported unique stone blocks. The precise placement and shape of each block was determined with the help of computer-aided design . The architects used local resources and existing production techniques to constructs Stone Matters. For instance, the polystyrene blocks used for formwork were roughly cut in a local factory before transported to another factory for robotic carving. Related: Drones weave moth-inspired pavilion from carbon fiber threads “ Palestine suffers of a misuse of stone as a structural material: while it was an abundant material used for structural purposes in the past, it is now used as a cladding material only and the know-how of stone building is disappearing,” writes AAU Anastas. “The research aims at including stone stereotomy – the processes of cutting stones – construction processes in contemporary architecture. It relies on novel computational simulation and fabrication techniques in order to present a modern stone construction technique as part of a local and global architectural language.” + AAU Anastas Via ArchDaily

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Palestinian architects give the ancient stone vault a modern twist in Jericho

Tiny artist cabins give the California desert a sci-fi-esque appeal

August 22, 2016 by  
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Located on a remote campsite within Zittel’s 35-acre A-Z property, the Wagon Station Encampment was conceived to welcome creative minds to get in touch with their “desert fantasy.” The Encampment is open twice a year when the desert climate is mild—in the spring and fall—with each “open season” divided into weeklong sessions. “It is open to anyone who feels an affinity with Andrea’s mission in the high desert – including (but not limited to) other artists, writers, thinkers, hikers, campers or those who are engaged in other forms of cultural or personal research,” says a statement on Zittel’s website. Related: This iconic desert tree is in danger because of climate change Each tiny portable pod is made from wood and metal and elevated off the ground to keep guests safe from scorpions and other critters. Guests enter through a curved hatch door that opens up to reveal a comfy bed and a small amount of storage space. One of the curved panels is transparent to allow for views to the outdoors. The pods can be collapsed and moved as needed. In addition to the wagons, the site also includes a communal outdoor kitchen , open-air showers, and composting toilets. Interested guests of the Wagon Station Encampment must submit an application for consideration. Each weekly sessions costs $100. + Andrea Zittel Via Dezeen Images via Andrea Zittel

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Tiny artist cabins give the California desert a sci-fi-esque appeal

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