Provocative timber horn explores the hypnotic pull of the unknown

July 24, 2017 by  
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Digital fabrication and traditional woodworking fuse together in Y, a modern sculpture with a provocative and pixelated appearance. A team of international architects and carpenters comprising &’ [Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta & Company Architects] collaborated with the Finnish National Museum to create the funnel-shaped art piece in Helsinki’s Seurasaari open-air museum. The intriguing artwork is built from horizontal prefabricated cross-laminated timber elements interlocked by 568 timber wedges. The temporary Y was built in the historical Niemelä Tenant Farm courtyard , creating a new social space on museum grounds. “Y is an equation of temporality, time and provocative use of wood in the museum milieu,” wrote the architects. “As Y is the mathematical symbol for the unknown, the installation Y points to the future and the possible outcomes of Nordic built heritage. In Niemelä, Y is a variable within the parameter of time.” The funnels-shaped sculpture is large enough to climb into and explore like a cave, and its hypnotic effect encourages meditative practice. Related: Palestinian architects give the ancient stone vault a modern twist in Jericho Architecturally, the most interesting aspect of Y is its combination of digital fabrication with traditional woodworking . The project’s carpenters used traditional handicraft methods to help develop the project, while the architects brought their set of digital design and production tools to the table. The result is a sculpture that functions like a giant wooden joint that’s built from prefabricated cross-laminated timber elements. The use of timber gives the artwork a feeling of familiarity, however the pixelated appearance adds a touch of the futuristic and unknown. + &’ [Emmi Keskisarja & Janne Teräsvirta & Company Architects] Images by SWANG

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Provocative timber horn explores the hypnotic pull of the unknown

Frederike Top’s geometric LED lamps cast colorful rays of ever-changing light

July 21, 2017 by  
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Amsterdam-based designer Frederike Top just unveiled her latest work – and it’s literally brilliant. Reflected Sequence is a series of reflective mobiles that use geometric panels and LED lights to cast colorful, ever-changing reflections. Top creates her striking pieces by stringing together panels of semi-transparent acrylate covered in iridescent foil. The series consists of hanging mobiles, table lamps, and window danglings illuminated by LED bulbs . Related: Stickbulb’s new Boom LED lamp is made of reclaimed wood from NYC water tanks Whether hanging from the ceiling or placed on a table, the lamps create a kaleidoscopic light show that varies depending on the angle of view. The result is a dynamic, ever-changing light source that never casts the same light twice. + Frederike Top

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Frederike Top’s geometric LED lamps cast colorful rays of ever-changing light

Gorgeous billboards by street artist Kelsey Montague are being recycled into one-of-a-kind bags

July 19, 2017 by  
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Kelsey Montague  is best known for her murals of sprawling angel wings, flocks of dragonflies, and other flights of fancy. Now, fans will be able to tote her work wherever they roam. After a stint as a featured #ArtLives artist for Rareform —a company that turns billboards into one-of-a-kind bags and accessories—Montague will receive the label’s signature treatment. For two weeks, billboards promoting Montague’s work held court near the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles and the L.A. Forum on West Century Boulevard. After being taken down, the banners are being chopped up and remade into 50 backpacks, 130 tote bags, and 80 accessory bags. Once complete, the accessories will be available for sale at the IFF Shop in Montague’s native Denver, as well as online at www.rareform.com and www.kelseymontagueart.com . Related: New pollution-fighting billboards can purify 100,000 cubic meters of air every day “This type of event lets us revolutionize how people see outdoor advertisements and transforms art into new forms,” Rareform said on its blog . “Own a little piece of art that has seen the skyline of Los Angeles and has been viewed by millions.” Montague followed the footsteps of fellow artists Tyler Ramsey and Milton Glaser when she participated in Rareform’s third #ArtLives series in Los Angeles on June 26. + Kelsey Montague + Rareform

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Gorgeous billboards by street artist Kelsey Montague are being recycled into one-of-a-kind bags

LAGI announces location for 2018 renewable energy design competition

July 18, 2017 by  
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Energy infrastructure of the past, like oil refineries and rigs, aren’t typically considered beautiful. But as the world transitions to more renewable sources of power, what if utility-scale energy installations could double as art ? That’s the dream pursued by the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), which holds a design competition every two years to present visions for energy-generating art able to power hundreds of homes. 2016’s winners included ethereal sailboats that harvested wind for power and fog for water, and a whale-inspired design generating wind, solar , and wave energy . LAGI just announced the location for their 2018 competition: Melbourne , Australia. LAGI is being sponsored by the State of Victoria to bring their 2018 contest to Melbourne, a city which hopes to be net zero by 2020. Artists, scientists, engineers, designers, and other creatives from around the world will be invited to submit designs tailored to the area for large-scale installations that add to the beauty of the area while generating clean energy . Related: Land Art Generator Initiative Santa Monica winners address California’s energy needs and drought One goal for these designs is to show how renewable energy installations, like solar and wind, can be integrated into the nature and culture of a region. LAGI2018 is part of Victoria’s Renewable Energy Action Plan under Action 13, which calls for “supporting important artistic and cultural sustainability events.” 2016’s top three winners included teams from Japan, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. The last four competitions – Dubai/Abu Dhabi in 2010, New York City in 2012, Copenhagen in 2014, and Santa Monica in 2016 – garnered over 800 submissions from more than 60 countries. The competition will launch in around six months, in January 2018, with submissions due in May. Public exhibitions will introduce some of the ideas to the people of Melbourne and nearby cities. According to LAGI, “2018 will be a year to celebrate the beauty of our sustainable future!” + Land Art Generator Initiative Images via Wikimedia Commons and courtesy of the Land Art Generator Initiative

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LAGI announces location for 2018 renewable energy design competition

Artist creates life-sized replica of Parthenon using 100,000 banned books

July 7, 2017 by  
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Argentine artist Marta Minujín has created a life-sized replica of the Parthenon using 100,000 banned books from around the world. The massive book art installation is a replica of the famous Greek temple where democracy was born. However, the location of the ambitious project is more than just a symbolic statement – its located on Friedrichsplatz in Kassel, Germany where over 2,000 books were burned in one day by Nazis in 1933. During the “Aktion wider den undeutschen Geist” (Campaign against the Un-German Spirit), which took place on May 19, 1933, some 2,000 books were burned in the Friedrichsplatz. Minujín says that her installation, which is part of a 100-day art event called Documenta 14, was inspired by the “aesthetic and political ideals of the first democracy” and meant to be a modern-day tribute to democracy. According to the artist, creating the building out of banned books is a symbol of resistance to the ongoing persecution of freedom of speech. Related: Glowing circle made from thousands of recycled notebooks celebrate Bilbao’s book festival The artist worked with students from Kassel University to identify almost 200 book titles that have been banned at some point in history. She then put out a call for people around the world to donate their own copies of the books to be used in the art project . She received hundreds of thousands of books that were wrapped in plastic to protect them from the elements while allowing them to be easily identified. The Parthenon of Books will be on display until mid-September. + Marta Minujín Via This is Colossal Images via Documenta 14

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Artist creates life-sized replica of Parthenon using 100,000 banned books

Bring the Outdoors In: Make Your Apartment a Garden Sanctuary

June 26, 2017 by  
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By Katherine Medlin One of the biggest drawbacks of apartment living can be the lack of an outdoor space, especially for nature lovers. Don’t have a nice balcony or patio? That doesn’t mean you can’t let nature in, making your apartment a more…

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Bring the Outdoors In: Make Your Apartment a Garden Sanctuary

This giant nest for humans lets you curl up and get away from it all

June 21, 2017 by  
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Lounging around in a giant nest might sound like something out of a fairy tale, but thanks to this eclectic design by Italian artist  Gianni Ruffi , it can be reality. Italy-based  Gufram  just released this surreal, human-size nest called  La Cova . Complete with two “egg” pillows, it isn’t just a piece of furniture, but a piece of art that lets you get away from it all. La Cova comes with two eggs, like any good nest should, that act as pillows. The nest is made of polyurethane foam and finished with 100% cotton. It measures 2 meters in diameter and weighs about 80 kg (176 lb). The original piece was created back in 1972 by Gianni Ruffi , who was part of the Radical Design movement in Italy. It was auctioned for the record price of 100,000 Euros. The iconic La Cova design has been re-invented with newer materials that combine craftsmanship know-how and newer industrial processes. The construction has also been updated with stretchable and extremely durable materials, the density of which provide excellent mechanical properties – especially in terms of elastic resilience. Related: Porky Hefer’s Cozy Human Nests Hang From the Treetops! Each version of the organic love nests are unique, thanks to the creation process – each one finished with thousands of pieces of cloth, all sewn by hand. La Cova appeared at the  La Triennale di Milano for  Milan Design Week 2017 . + Gufram Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat and Gufram

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This giant nest for humans lets you curl up and get away from it all

Reflective arrow-shaped studio is a futuristic space for displaying art

June 15, 2017 by  
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When Mr. White retired, he had an unusual building request: he wanted a studio where he could work and display his art that had few windows but provided plenty of natural light – all while enhancing his garden. The result looks like a futuristic space dwelling fell out of the sky and into Victoria. Australian architects Nervegna Reed Architecture and PH Architects teamed up to create the Arrow Studio, a private art gallery that provides a secure space for a local art connoisseur to safely display his private collection. Located in the outskirts of Hanging Rock, Victoria, the small art gallery was created for an art collector who wanted to securely display his private collection and have room for a studio space. The client requested that the structure have minimal windows for not only security reasons, but also to create sufficient wall space to hang the artwork. He also requested that the few windows that were installed be framed in such a way that would impede intruders from breaking in. Related: Century-old packing shed brought back to life as a contemporary art gallery According to the architects, these specific criteria led them to create a unique arrow-shaped design by starting with a rectangular volume whose interior was pushed inwards from one end, jutting out from the other. Curiously, this shape allowed the designers take advantage of the arrow’s indentation to create a formidable timber-slated screen that provides security as well as subtle natural light for the interior. The jutted screen also provides nice lighting for entertaining in the backyard area, beautifully illuminating the surrounding green space. The architects used plywood to create the structure’s frame, which as then coverd with large sheets of galvanized metal. This cladding provides the building with a second skin to properly insulate the structure and the artwork from harsh weather. The metal sheeting also gave the structure a fun reflective exterior that adds to the whimsical character of the building. + Nervegna Reed Architecture + PH Architects Via Arch Daily Photography by Sam Reed and Toby Reed

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Reflective arrow-shaped studio is a futuristic space for displaying art

Gargantuan lace sea urchins light up the night along Singapore’s marina

June 12, 2017 by  
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A swarm of gigantic, glowing sea urchins recently appeared on Singapore’s waterfront for the iLight Marina Bay Festival. Choi+Shine Architects constructed the larger-than-life creatures as “lacy rooms” that invite visitors to walk inside and enjoy their intricate structure and visual effects. The structures are inspired by sea urchin shells, which are elnclosed yet lightweight and porous. The architects recreated the intricate patterns of urchins using white double-braided polyester chord woven in 20 segments and attached to a metal frame. It took 50 people to assemble the structures by hand over a period of two months. Related: Robots helped build and sew together this amazing sea urchin-inspired pavilion Each sea urchin measures 56 feet in size and weighs around 220 pounds. The lacy pavilions are illuminated by white spot lights, creating the illusion that they glow in the dark. The calming effect and simplicity of the installation visually contrasts Singapore’s skyscrapers and celebrates the city’s cultural diversity. + Choi+Shine Architects Photos © 2016, 2017 Choi+Shine Architects

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Gargantuan lace sea urchins light up the night along Singapore’s marina

Korean barista creates incredible works of latte art

June 1, 2017 by  
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Latte art is nothing new; your favorite barista at the local coffee shop probably serves up drinks adorned with hearts or flowers. But Korean barista Kangbin Lee’s latte art, which he calls creamart, will totally blow your mind. From Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night to Disney-inspired pieces, these pieces of art look far too beautiful to drink. Lee, owner of Cafe C.Through in South Korea, has been a barista for 10 years. He says he’s never had any training in drawing, but that didn’t stop him from creating stunning latte art. You might be suspicious there was some Photoshop involved, but Lee demonstrates how he creates his art in the video below. Related: Artist paints stunning leaf art from leftover coffee grinds and stains Lee actually paints the colors on with a small spoon, using the foam as a backdrop and a color in many pieces. A metal stir stick allows him to add smaller details or blend colors. My Modern Met noted the process is remarkably similar to conventional painting . In another method of his latte art, Lee adds the pigments to the foam first before pouring it out over a cup of coffee to create colorful swirling shapes. #Rainbowlatteart . . . . . . . . #??? #cthrough #????? #?????? #???? #?????? #?????? #??? #????? #??? #????? #????? #???? #???? #????? #latteartporn #dailyart #coffee #barista #baristalife #latte #latteart #baristadaily #cafelatte #coffeetime #creamart #espresso #artwork A post shared by ??? (@leekangbin91) on May 18, 2017 at 4:48pm PDT In an Instagram post Lee said creamart is cold coffee, but that the taste doesn’t change as time passes. He’s as serious about coffee as he is about art and said taste is important to him. According to UPROXX , the artist uses espresso, chocolate sauce, and food coloring to create the works of art – so they’re entirely edible. He said customers always say they’ll never be able to drink the works of art but eventually doing just that. Lee is working to share his art with the world and has also started giving classes in creamart. + Kangbin Lee Via My Modern Met Images via leekangbin91 on Instagram

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