Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion

September 1, 2020 by  
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Sustainable fashion is on the rise, with materials from plastic water bottles to vegan apple leather becoming more and more common in the industry every day. Recent design graduate Jasmine Linington is taking sustainable fashion a step further with a new couture collection that uses seaweed-derived textiles. The eco-friendly and thoughtful clothing displays the versatility of this ocean resource through seaweed fibers, dyes and embellishments. “Having fallen in love with seaweed for its utter beauty and endless visual inspiration, whether that be for its colour, texture or composition, it was this initial capture that began the journey into my ‘ Seaweed Girl ’ project,” Linington said. “I have since spent the last few years exploring ways in which I can incorporate this alternative, highly sustainable material into my practice in a way that showcases its beauty, but also its environmental benefits.” Related: Surprising ways seaweed benefits the environment After learning that seaweed and microalgae make up about 90% of plant life on the planet, Linington became motivated to find innovative ways to use seaweed in fashion. Seaweed and microalgae are highly sustainable, especially because they are some of the fastest growing organisms on Earth. The inventive artist hand-harvests seaweed from the southeastern coast of Scotland to create the pieces. Linington develops the plants into beads and sequins for embellishments with a resin made from the byproducts of the harvesting process. For the fabrics , seaweed and eucalyptus cellulose combine to create SeaCell fibers. Seaweed is also used in the dying process to color the fabrics. These processes mean that everything in the collection is carbon-neutral and biodegradable. Linington’s project is ongoing. Next, the artist will be working on a line of textile wall hangings and artwork inspired by the seaweed collection as well as a small range of luxury interior accessories. + Jasmine Linington Via Dezeen Images via Jasmine Linington

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Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion

Office towers to boast first AI-driven facade powered by renewable energy

September 1, 2020 by  
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Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Australia-based architecture firm Fender Katsalidis Architects have placed first in an international competition to design Central Place Sydney, a new landmark development at Sydney’s Central Station in the Central Business District. The $2.5 billion commercial development is expected to revitalize the city’s busiest transport interchange on the western edge of Central Station. The project will feature a vibrant public realm along with two tech-focused office towers equipped with the very first AI-driven facade system powered entirely by renewable energy.  Developed in partnership with developers Dexus and Frasers Property Australia, Central Place Sydney will feature a 37-story tower and a 39-story tower set on a low-rise plinth that will engage the streetscape with ground-level retail, collaborative community spaces and extensive landscaping. Designed as a core element of the district’s burgeoning Tech Central area, the mixed-use development will offer approximately 150,000 square meters of office and retail space. The ground floor is highly permeable, and all public spaces were designed with a focus on easy and efficient pedestrian flow. Related: SOM unveils designs for first-ever human settlement on the moon The architects expect Central Place Sydney to be one of the most sustainable commercial developments in Australia. Not only will the project include highly flexible workspaces that integrate nature via winter gardens and outdoor terraces, but indoor spaces will also have ample access to natural light and ventilation via operable windows and an automated facade system. The site-specific design approach informed the shape of the buildings, which are engineered to mitigate wind forces and maximize natural light. The computer-controlled, renewable energy-powered facade will shield the interiors from unwanted solar gain.  “Central Place Sydney’s focal point is a major new civic space wrapped with activated retail edges, enriched by two commercial towers and a landmark central building,” said Mark Curzon, design director for Fender Katsalidis Architects. “It will redefine the precinct, completing Sydney’s vision for a ‘third square.’” + Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Images via Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

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How Everland is changing the eco-retreat scene

August 12, 2020 by  
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Imagine a place full of cutting-edge art, gorgeous community spaces, comfortable accommodations for everyone in the family and lots of opportunities to learn, explore and have fun. This is exactly what Everland Art Park is striving to become. Everland is designed to be a complete eco-retreat and immersive art park that everyone can enjoy. Here, you can truly immerse yourself in a world of art . You can find tranquility, explore your own creativity, discover nature and maybe even take a nap in a hammock. Everland is designed to be an eco-friendly retreat that’s all about connecting with and celebrating nature, something that humans forget how to do all too often. Related: Truly get away from it all at this gorgeous eco-resort and yoga retreat What is an art park? One of Everland’s main goals is to be an immersive art park filled with large-scale installations and other artworks of all kinds. The design is meant to surround you with art. Here, nature is part of the display itself. The natural world isn’t just a backdrop, it is part of the decor and a bigger part of the experience. Artists from all around the world have been working with Everland to create amazing art installations. These installations are connected through a trail network that will take you through different zones of the art park. Themed pieces will make you gasp, stare and even think deeply about issues like human archetypes, symbology, rites of passage and self-exploration. Even the trails are artist-created so that the journey itself is part of the artistic experience. You’ll go through various interactive storylines while you’re walking through Everland. The paths will take you through forests, past treehouses , into nature nests and along large-scale artworks. You’ll read messages and poems as you walk through the park, too. There are several different paths to choose from, depending on the type of journey you want. Take the Elder’s Path, the Inner Child’s Path, the Visionary’s Path, the Steward’s path, the Sky Path, the Earth Path or the Inner Path. Each one tells a different story and provides you with a different experience. Eco-retreat Everland strives to be more than a place where you can look at art. This is also an amazing eco-retreat. You can book traditional lodgings or camp out in tents, depending on the experience you want to have. Choose from traditional camping to glamping to relaxing in a comfortable cabin . The materials used to construct the lodgings are thoughtfully sourced, and the entire design is meant to go with the flow of nature, not against it. There are also lots of ways to play and enjoy nature here. There are meditation nooks everywhere, plenty of streams and ponds to explore, beautiful landscapes and several trails. Everland uses repurposed and upcycled materials to create play spaces and public spaces to enhance the natural world rather than take away from it. In total, Everland encompasses 145 acres of gorgeous landscape about 45 minutes outside of Denver, Colorado. Being eco-friendly is about using what is readily available in nature — resources that can be renewed through natural growth cycles. This eco-retreat is a great reminder that anyone can live a little more sustainably every day simply by using what is already around and what is renewable. Amenities The Retreat Center has 9,500 square feet full of gathering spaces. This center includes a community kitchen and dining area, two large meeting rooms and 13 private retreat rooms that all have their own exit to the rest of the retreat. Beautiful, rustic decor creates stunning places to relax, all set against the amazing natural backdrop of the Colorado wilderness. Everland is surrounded by national forests. The grounds include natural ponds and streams, a wetlands area, an outdoor amphitheater, the boulder fields and plenty of winding hiking, biking and walking trails. A dream deferred The spread of COVID-19 throughout the world put many plans for Everland on hold. However, this amazing art park and eco-retreat is on track to open for summer 2021 and will continue to expand as the years progress. Artists from around the world are still collaborating with Everland to create a unique place unlike any other on Earth. This eco-friendly retreat is all about connecting to nature and to the creative spirit. It’s a wonderful, beautiful way to relax and a great reminder that nature is meant to be enjoyed and celebrated. + Everland Photography by Jeff Jones Photography via Everland

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How Everland is changing the eco-retreat scene

Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

June 16, 2020 by  
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Four years after its initial conception, Australia’s  Museum of Underwater Art  has finally opened to the public, becoming the first-ever underwater art museum in the Southern Hemisphere. Located off the coast of Townsville North Queensland in the central part of the Great Barrier Reef , the unique museum aims to strengthen the region’s position as a leader in reef conservation, restoration and education. World-famous underwater sculptor and environmentalist Jason deCaires Taylor conceptualized the first two installations — the Ocean Siren and Coral Greenhouse. As the inaugural sculpture of the Museum of Underwater Art, the Ocean Siren was conceived as an above-water beacon for raising awareness about  ocean conservation . The inspiration for the statue, as reported by CNBC, is 12-year-old Takoda Johnson, a “member of the local Wulgurukaba people, one of two traditional owners of the local land.” The sculpture reacts to live water temperature data from the Davies Reef weather station on the Great Barrier Reef by changing color depending on temperature variations.  Underwater and approximately 80 kilometers from shore, the John Brewer Reef “Coral Greenhouse” welcomes divers to the heart of the Greater Barrier Reef Marine Park with messages of reef conservation and restoration. The installation is the largest MOUA exhibit, weighing over 58 tons and filled with and surrounded by 20 “reef guardian” sculptures. All construction is made from stainless steel and pH-neutral materials to encourage  coral  growth. Related: This stunning underwater art museum is now open in the Maldives “MOUA offers a contemporary platform to share the stories of the reef, and the culture of its  First Nations  people, as well as spark a meaningful conversation and solution to reef conservation,” reads an MOUA press release emphasizing the museum’s many educational opportunities. The Ocean Siren and the Coral Greenhouse were completed as part of MOUA’s first phase; future installations include Palm Island and Magnetic Island. MOUA is estimated to generate over $42.1 million in annual economic output and create 182 jobs through the local tourism and conservation sectors. + Museum of Underwater Art Images via Jason deCaires Taylor

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Robert De Niro and partners to open a garden hotel in Poland

May 29, 2020 by  
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If a glimpse into history is on your bucket list, a stay at the soon-to-open Nobu hotel in Poland can help put a check in that column. Decimated by World War II, the city of Warsaw originated in the 1300s and has been under meticulous reconstruction for decades. Blending the old with the new, historical architecture is balanced with nearby neighborhoods that are alive with trendy wine bars, art galleries and cafes. Joining the creative hub is the newest addition to the Nobu family of hotels being built by Nobu Hospitality, a globally established lifestyle brand owned by actor Robert De Niro, chef Nobu Matsuhisa and film producer Meir Teper. The heart of this capital city will be the site of the V-shaped hotel. Nobu Hotel Warsaw will feature 117 sleek and spacious rooms along with meeting and event spaces, an expansive fitness center and the signature Nobu Restaurant and café. “Nobu Hotel Warsaw is a really exciting project for us,” said Trevor Horwell, Chief Executive Officer of Nobu Hotels . “The luxury hospitality market has been gaining momentum in Warsaw for a while. There’s a certain type of energy that extends far beyond the bricks and mortar – we’re very excited to be at the forefront of this new wave of lifestyle and hospitality development – and being from Poland originally, this opening is particularly exciting for our co-founder Meir Teper.” While luxury and the location are undeniably enticing, the building design also represents a marriage of the historic with modern elements that feed a need to completely understand the multifaceted city. Half of the hotel is housed in what used to be the Hotel Rialto, a building dating back to the 1920s that represents Art Deco design elements. A lobby connects this sample of Warsaw’s past to the other wing of the hotel, an ultra-contemporary space designed in collaboration with Polish architectural firm Medusa Group and California-based Studio PCH. The outdoor space features a pyramid of balconies with living gardens for a contrast of green space to cityscape. Hotel Nobu Warsaw is one of 18 hotels by Nobu Hospitality spanning five continents, each offering premium service, unique design elements and an extraordinary culinary experience. The Hotel Nobu Warsaw is expected to open in August 2020. + Nobu Hotel Images via ?ukasz K?pielewski

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Robert De Niro and partners to open a garden hotel in Poland

Artists for the Earth — Earth Day 2020

April 15, 2020 by  
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This is the fifth in a series of six articles … The post Artists for the Earth — Earth Day 2020 appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Maven Moment: Working From Home

April 15, 2020 by  
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My mom worked from home as a seamstress all of … The post Maven Moment: Working From Home appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Glowing Wishing Pavilion is made with 5,000 recycled plastic bricks

April 13, 2020 by  
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To celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival of 2019, Hong Kong-based studio Daydreamers Design crafted a glowing lantern-inspired pavilion that also raises awareness of environmental issues. Dubbed the Wishing Pavilion, the temporary installation was constructed from 5,000 bricks made of recycled high-density polyethylene, the same type of plastic commonly used in water bottles. Manufactured in seven colors, the plastic bricks created a gradient evocative of a flame, an effect enhanced by the use of sound effects, music and LED lights at night. Commissioned by the Government of Hong Kong, the Wishing Pavilion served as the anchor pavilion for the “Mid-Autumn Lantern Displays 2019” at the Victoria Park Soccer Pitch No. 1, Causeway Bay from September 13 to September 27, 2019. Daydreamers Design created the pavilion as an evolution of its 2019 “Rising Moon” project, which also called attention to environmental issues. The pavilion’s 5,000 recycled plastic bricks are arranged to form a rounded, lantern-like structure stretching 18 meters in diameter and 6 meters tall, with no foundation work needed. The modular design allowed the designers to swiftly assemble the pavilion in just 12 days.  Related: 30,000 recycled water bottles make up this 3D-printed pavilion The pavilion’s lantern-like shape references two Mid-Autumn Festival traditions: releasing candle-lit lanterns with people’s wishes written on the sides into the night sky and burning tall, purpose-built structures for good luck and good harvests. Unlike these practices, Daydreamers Design’s eco-friendly pavilion is fire-free. The recycled plastic bricks were stacked to create a flame-like gradient ranging from yellow to red. The stacks also form a double-helix layout centered on a “burning lantern” sculpture. The pavilion opens up with a 7.5-meter circular skylight to frame the full harvest moon. “Mid-Autumn Festival, falling on the 15th day of the eighth lunar month, is when the families reunite to celebrate autumn harvests, light up lanterns and admire the bright moon of the year,” the designers explained. “The rituals and celebration continued for 2000 years; the famous poem by Li Bai signifies the value and meaning of Mid-Autumn Festival. Wishing Pavilion intends to embrace the tradition, recall the harmonious union and raise awareness to today’s social challenge.” + Daydreamers Design Images via Daydreamers Design

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Glowing Wishing Pavilion is made with 5,000 recycled plastic bricks

Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

April 6, 2020 by  
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The innovative team at U.K.-based Inclume has come up with a unique way to take a break from the stresses of life. Its latest design is a reclaimed wood raft that accommodates two people. The Tetra raft even features a peaceful shading canopy made out of delicate, origami paper forms. Inspired by the shape of an abstracted sail, the volume of the raft incorporates multiple tetrahedron shapes. Entirely constructed out of reclaimed materials, Tetra achieves its buoyancy thanks to three old barrels that were donated to the team. Atop the barrels is the main platform, which is made of salvaged shipping pallets provided by a local carpenter. Several discarded garden bamboo canes comprise the frame and canopy. Even the boat’s oars, which were sanded and painted with a triangular motif, were donated from a local boat club. Related: Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming With its tiny size and rustic nature, the reclaimed wood raft is perfect for an escape on the water. Adding a bit of serenity to the design is a beautiful, handcrafted canopy. This canopy consists of several triangular frames, which are crafted from thread entwined with recycled paper. The canopy is then covered in origami paper forms that add whimsy to the overall design. Intricately folded by hand, the paper forms sway gently in the wind and allow natural light and shade to dance across the raft. The Tetra raft was a temporary installation that took place on a local lake. During the day, passersby were encouraged to help the team construct parts of the raft on the shore. According to the designers, the aim of the event was not only to build a temporary, water-based shelter out of reclaimed materials, but to also encourage people to participate in similar projects in their communities. + Inclume Images via Inclume

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Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

April 6, 2020 by  
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The innovative team at U.K.-based Inclume has come up with a unique way to take a break from the stresses of life. Its latest design is a reclaimed wood raft that accommodates two people. The Tetra raft even features a peaceful shading canopy made out of delicate, origami paper forms. Inspired by the shape of an abstracted sail, the volume of the raft incorporates multiple tetrahedron shapes. Entirely constructed out of reclaimed materials, Tetra achieves its buoyancy thanks to three old barrels that were donated to the team. Atop the barrels is the main platform, which is made of salvaged shipping pallets provided by a local carpenter. Several discarded garden bamboo canes comprise the frame and canopy. Even the boat’s oars, which were sanded and painted with a triangular motif, were donated from a local boat club. Related: Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming With its tiny size and rustic nature, the reclaimed wood raft is perfect for an escape on the water. Adding a bit of serenity to the design is a beautiful, handcrafted canopy. This canopy consists of several triangular frames, which are crafted from thread entwined with recycled paper. The canopy is then covered in origami paper forms that add whimsy to the overall design. Intricately folded by hand, the paper forms sway gently in the wind and allow natural light and shade to dance across the raft. The Tetra raft was a temporary installation that took place on a local lake. During the day, passersby were encouraged to help the team construct parts of the raft on the shore. According to the designers, the aim of the event was not only to build a temporary, water-based shelter out of reclaimed materials, but to also encourage people to participate in similar projects in their communities. + Inclume Images via Inclume

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Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

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