This amazing rotating home lets you change the view with a push of a button

September 13, 2017 by  
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UK-based D*Haus has put a new “spin” on residential architecture by developing a home with a spectacular rotating roof! The newly unveiled Devon House has a glazed top floor that spins on circular platform, giving the homeowners unobstructed views of the surrounding countryside from literally every angle. The rotating home was designed to make the most of views on the sloped site. “Our client dreamt of waking up in their bed with views across this landscape and then having the ability to rotate the living room and kitchen so that they could enjoy the same view throughout the day,” explained David Ben Grunberg and Daniel Woolfson from D*Haus. Related: The Transforming D*Haus Changes Shape to Accommodate Different Seasons Building upon their Dynamic D*Haus, the architects developed a triangular swiveling roof that wouldn’t distract from the home’s rough stone base, “We took an equilateral triangle and started to rotate it around an open core, we wanted the circle to be a rotating platform that would move and change with the external climatic conditions and with the clients preferences,” said the architects. The resulting design is an equilateral volume with three elongated corners that house a bedroom, lounge, and dining room on the top floor. The home rotates in accordance with the sun’s position as well as changing seasons and weather conditions. Every room has large glazed walls that offers amazing views and tons of natural light . + The D*Haus Company Via Dezeen Images by Jason Luckett and Park Hin Yeung

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This amazing rotating home lets you change the view with a push of a button

Beautiful cedar home stands high on stilts to accommodate heavy snowfall in Japan

September 13, 2017 by  
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Fukushima-based firm Life Style Koubou has embedded a beautiful vacation home in the middle of an evergreen forest with stunning mountain views. Built at the base of Mount Bandai in Japan, the One Year Project is made from locally-sourced cedar and it’s set on high stilts to allow snow to gather around its base. The two structures that make up the home are connected by a bridge and separated by use. One building holds a wet area with the kitchen and bathrooms, while a living room with a cozy fireplace is located in the dry building. The entire structure was built using cedar, but the dry building has floor-to-ceiling windows to enjoy 360-degree views of the amazing scenery. Related: Life Style Koubou’s House In Itsuura is a timber treehouse-like home in Japan The area around Mount Bandai is known to get quite a lot of snowfall in the winter, so the architects built the home on stilts to accommodate the snowfall. The white stilts, which run up through the interior of the buildings, are embedded into large rocks that sit on the ground underneath in order to reduce the building’s pressure on the land . The strategic design lets the homeowners enjoy the natural area without damaging the landscape. + Life Style Koubou Via Contemporist

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Beautiful cedar home stands high on stilts to accommodate heavy snowfall in Japan

This mind-blowing building is made from material as thin as a coin

September 13, 2017 by  
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MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY’s giant alien-like structure is pushing the envelope for self-supporting architecture. Built of material as thin as a coin, Minima | Maxima is a 43-foot-tall organic building commissioned for the World Expo 2017 in Astana, Kazakhstan. The self-supporting structure is an incredible achievement; as the studio puts it: “If an egg were scaled up to the same height as Minima | Maxima, it would be much thicker.” Like most of MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY’s projects, Minima | Maxima looks like something straight out of science fiction with its organic yet alien shape created using digital tools. The installation is as tall as a four-story building and is built from 2-millimeter-thick aluminum . The studio used their signature “Structural Stripes” material to build the self-supporting curvilinear structure, and reinforced it with multi-ply composite. Three flat strips of powder-coated aluminum—white and white sandwiching pink—are layered to create a 6-millimeter-thick anisotropic composite material comparable to fiber technology like carbon or glass fiber, yet does not need to be in tension or temporary scaffolding. Related: MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY’s ultralight informal amphitheater in France looks like an opening chrysalis “The unprecedented structural achievement of the project lies in its geometry,” said the studio. “Minima | Maxima extends MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY’s research and development into achieving structural integrity through ultra-thin, self-supporting structures which find their strength in the double curvature of their form. In the whimsical yet durable universe the studio creates, curves win out over angles; branches, splits and recombinations make columns and beams irrelevant. A ‘networked’ surface rolls in, on and around itself, transforming into a space that obscures our preconceived notions of enclosure, entrance/exit, and threshold, while also providing its own support to stand up.” Minima | Maxima was completed in June 2017 in Astana , Kazakhstan and is a permanent installation. + MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Images © NAARO

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This mind-blowing building is made from material as thin as a coin

Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

September 12, 2017 by  
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A modular fast food restaurant popped up in Siauliai, Lithuania, to provide a healthy communal space that can be easily replicated anywhere. Architecture firm Hermann Kamte & Associates designed the restaurant, named Lego Lunch, as an affordable, reconfigurable space built from recycled shipping containers. Lego Lunch is a replicable structure that combines affordability and a low carbon footprint . The architects used recycled 20-foot shipping containers and combined them into a space where locals in Siauliai, Lithuania, can have a meal and relax during workdays. Small design interventions enhance the energy performance of the new building and give with warmth. LED lighting and additional insulation were also introduced to improve efficiency. Related: Nation’s largest shipping container restaurant was installed in just 3 days The architects conducted extensive programmatic analyses to achieve an optimal organization of the space. The purpose of the first analysis was to understand connections and interactions between owners, designers and customers. The second focused on the food preparation process, while the last phase combined the preceding two to create an optimal layout. + Hermann Kamte & Associates

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Modular Lego Lunch restaurant built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Lithuania

Sweden is putting stressed-out people in tiny glass ‘chillout cabins’

September 12, 2017 by  
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Can nature really be the cure for stress? Sweden wants to find out – so it’s sending five people in extremely stressful professions to spend three glorious days in beautiful glass-enclosed “ chillout cabins ” on an idyllic island. The 72 Hour Cabin program seeks to investigate the effects of nature on people’s well-being. Led by researchers Walter Osika and Cecilia Stenfors from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, the case study explores how Allemansrätten (freedom to roam) affects people’s mental and physical health. The aim of the study is to spread awareness of the unique relationship the Swedish population has with nature , and encourage people around the world to spend more time bonding with Mother Nature. Related: Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods “Year after year, Sweden takes first place in international rankings of countries with the best life quality. Swedish nature, which is clean, vast and easy to take part in, is a part of the secret.” the 72-hour website reads. “The Swedes’ unique relationship with nature is an important part of their well-being, which is why Sweden has created ‘The 72 Hour Cabin’. With the initiative, Sweden wants to acquaint visitors with the special bond that Swedes have with their natural environment, and invite the world to experience it themselves.” The lucky participants include a London broadcaster, a Parisian taxi driver, an event planner from New York, a German police officer, and a British travel journalist. Each will spend three days in their own cabin located on Henriksholm island in West Sweden, experiencing the Swedish “close to nature” lifestyle. All communication with the outside world will be forbidden. For the most part, the participants will be able to hike, fish, cook, swim, and generally enjoy their peaceful surroundings. Researchers will be on-site to measure their well-being based on stress levels, problem-solving ability, and creativity. The results of the study will be presented in October. The glass cabins were designed by Jeanna Berger and built with the help of Fridh & Hells Bygg AB Construction Company . Berger grew up on the island and used the beautiful area as inspiration for the design. The wood-framed structures – which are placed on pillars in order to leave a light footprint – were inspired by the traditional barns found in the area. + 72 Hour Cabin Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Maja Flink  

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Sweden is putting stressed-out people in tiny glass ‘chillout cabins’

Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

September 11, 2017 by  
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How do you bring an ancient landscape to life? Architecture studio NEON breathes life into England’s historical Chesters Roman Fort by recreating the sound of 500 galloping horses. Architect Mark Nixon led the design of Cavalary 360, a wind-powered installation that mimics the sounds of horse hooves clopping on the ground while framing the North Tyne landscape. The site-specific musical instrument pays homage to the 500 horses that belonged to the Roman cavalrymen that roamed the land 1,600 years ago. Calvary 360 was created as part of Hadrian’s Calvary, an exhibition that celebrates the Roman cavalry with unique installations installed along Hadrian’s Wall . “It can be difficult to make a connection between the preserved walls of the Roman cavalry fort (the most extensive in Britain) and the powerful mounted troops based here,” wrote NEON. “Cavalry 360° is a vast site specific musical instrument which uses the force of the wind to create the sound of the cavalry moving across the landscape beyond. The piece creates an equine soundscape as a means of evoking the imagination of the viewer to fill in the gaps.” Related: Mobile residence for writers to meander the border of England’s former Roman Empire The massive musical instrument is a circular structure made up of 32 wind turbines elevated on tall black frames. Each wind turbine is connected to 15 beaters, each of which represents a single horse in the cavalry. The frame units are visually paired to represent the 30 horses in a turma, the term for a cavalry unit in the Roman Roman army. The cups at the end of the three turbine arms catch the wind, which powers and rotates the insulation that changes sound depending on the direction and speed of the wind. Visitors are encouraged to stand in the middle of Cavalary 360 to experience the full effect and look out to views of the fort and landscape through the black frames. + NEON Via Dezeen Images by Lightly Frozen

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Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

Sheep farm deep in Iceland’s fjords transformed into luxury off-grid retreat

September 8, 2017 by  
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A sheep farm tucked into the mountainous landscape of Iceland’s Troll Peninsula has been transformed into the stunning Deplar Farm resort. Surrounded by breathtaking scenery, the off-grid lodge really couldn’t be more remote – and it celebrates the true unspoiled beauty of the area. Best of all, Deplar Farm was renovated with locally-sourced materials and a lush green roof. Although it has been converted into luxury cottages, the farm still maintains much of his humble character. Locally-sourced materials were used in the renovation process – including natural stone from nearby rivers. An elongated grass-covered roof runs the length of the dark timber building, helping it blend into the natural landscape. Related: Green-roofed vacation cottages blend into the gorgeous landscape of Iceland The resort offers 13 en suite rooms, each with an abundance of large windows to provide stellar views of the surrounding mountains, lakes and rivers. Guests not content to enjoy the view from the warmth of the lounge or spa can enjoy any number of thrilling activities in the area – from heli-sking to snowmobiling. And for the ultimate experience, guests can take in the Northern Lights while swimming in the resort’s geothermal infinity pool. + Deplar Farm Via Uncrate Images via Deplar Farm

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Sheep farm deep in Iceland’s fjords transformed into luxury off-grid retreat

Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

September 7, 2017 by  
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Montpellier’s summer  Festival des Architectures Vives is a fun annual event that sees various architectural installations from emerging designers tucked into various courtyards around the city. This year’s exhibitions are all unique, but one funky hut made of 2,500 plastic bricks brings some vibrant color to the event. Created by Atelier Micromega , La Madeleine is a large cube structure that invites adults and kids alike to explore its LEGO-inspired fun. The yearly event is aimed at fostering the relationship between historic urban environments and contemporary architecture . Every year, various teams of young architects and designers install their unique installations in the city’s many courtyards. The 2017 edition is showcasing ten emerging design firms whose work was designed to reflect this year’s theme of “emotion.” Related: These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200 Atelier Micromega, whose team includes five young architects, installed La Madeleine in hopes of bringing visitors back to their childhood. Thousands of colorful plastic bricks were used to create the hut, complete with an open-air skylight in the ceiling. Some of the bricks on the interior are interchangeable so visitors can modify the bricks to change the hut’s interior during their visit. According to the team, their design was inspired by nostalgia, “The installation rests on architecture, space and matter to play with our nostalgia. It invites the visitor to be moved by traveling through it, interacting with it, echoing his childhood memories. The smooth, perfect cube refers to adulthood. The world that it contains: evolutionary, creative and malleable appeals to the child, making the space of the cave his cabin.” After the event, all of the plastic bricks will be donated to several child-care facilities around Montpellier as well as the national charity organization, Les Restos du Coeur . + Atelier Microméga Via v2com Photography via Paul Kozlowski  

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Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

Star Wars-inspired NASA observatory will offer galactic views in Cyprus

September 7, 2017 by  
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A spaceship-like observatory is set to land atop a Cyprus mountain. Kyriakos Tsolakis Architects got the green light for a space science center that will give NASA greater research coverage over the Middle East. Located in the Troodos Mountains, this Sci Fi-inspired building commands an impressive and distinctive silhouette to “inspire and excite anyone who sees it from afar or from up close.” Named Star Observatory, the spaceship-like building will be the first purpose-built observatory in Cyprus . Renderings show the structure perched atop a tree-covered mountain 1,200 meters above sea level in Troodos Geopark, a 115-hectare UNESCO-listed park in central Cyprus. The observatory will give NASA researchers the opportunity to track celestial phenomena in the Middle East, a region where there is insufficient data. “Elena and I drew inspiration from sci-fi when drawing up plans for this observatory – I was a Star Wars fan growing up,” said architects Nicodemos K Tsolakis and Elena K Tsolakis of his and his wife’s design process to Dezeen. “Of course the client didn’t know this when they hired us. They were pretty surprised with where we took it but they love the ideas.” Related: Roden Crater is a magic space for observing cycles of geologic and celestial time The spaceship-like research center features a wedge shape with a dome on one end and a cantilevered terrace on the other. The Star Observatory will include two telescopes for daytime and nighttime viewing and visitors will also be allowed bring their own telescopes. The robust observatory will be able to withstand the region’s extreme temperatures, from blistering hot summers to below freezing temperatures in winter. + Kyriakos Tsolakis Architects Via Dezeen Images via Kyriakos Tsolakis Architects , by MIR

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Star Wars-inspired NASA observatory will offer galactic views in Cyprus

Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain

September 7, 2017 by  
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Vo Trong Nghia Architects worked their bamboo magic on a slender residence in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City . In a bid to add green space in the city’s increasingly dense concrete jungle, the architects installed giant bamboo-filled planters to the building’s street-facing facade. Located in the city’s colorful and bustling central urban district, the House in District 1 uses the green screens for privacy, air purification, shading, and visual appeal. From the street, the House in District 1 looks like a series of stacked and staggered planters bursting with bushy bamboo . The overgrown effect contrasts sharply with the home’s minimalist and modern design. Concrete is predominately used and is texturized to lessen its monolithic appearance. “In addition to growing bamboo on the front facade, the concrete formwork is also made by using bamboo to allow a consistent design language,” said Vo Trong Nghia Architect, according to Dezeen . “The bamboo texture also helps to reduce the intense and heavy appearance of conventional concrete wall and thus, improves the overall aesthetic quality of the house.” Related: Lush green rooftop terrace invites homeowners outdoors in the foothills of Vietnam The four-story Ho Chi Minh residence features a guest room and entry hall on the first floor with an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen on the floor above. The kids’ bedroom and the master bedroom with ensuite bathroom are located on the second and third floors, respectively. The top floor houses the home office that opens up to an outdoor rooftop swimming pool. The bamboo planters are on every floor and provide privacy, shade, and protection from the tropical rains. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Via Dezeen Images via Hiroyuki Oki

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Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain

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