This beautiful Washington cabin meets net-zero targets even in extreme temperatures

September 13, 2018 by  
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Nestled in a historic mining area in Washington State’s Cascade Mountains, a holiday retreat offers luxurious comfort without compromising sustainability targets. Despite the region’s freezing cold winters and extremely hot summers, Bainbridge Island-based Coates Design Architects crafted the Tumble Creek Cabin to net-zero energy standards using renewable energy and passive solar strategies, rather than traditional energy consumptive cooling and heating systems. Powered by solar energy, the energy-efficient cabin boasts a contemporary design with an abundance of full-height glazing to look out on the landscape beyond. With a natural palette designed to evoke the region’s mining history, the 3,835-square-foot Tumble Creek Cabin is mainly built of stone, Corten steel and reclaimed barn wood. The steel and timber elements are left exposed throughout, while floor-to-ceiling glazing establishes strong connections with the outdoors. To minimize the home’s energy usage, Coates Design Architects oriented the home to follow passive solar principles and mapped the interior layout to conserve energy as much as possible. The self-contained entry vestibule and mud room, for instance, doubles as an air lock to stop chilly drafts and unwanted hot air from entering the main living spaces. Designed as “a legacy piece” for the clients’ extended family, the vacation home includes two primary bedroom suites and a bunk room in the main residence, and an additional guest room can be found in the separate extension. An L-shaped open-plan great room on the east side of the main house is anchored by a massive board-formed concrete fireplace and opens up to a spacious patio. A winding outdoor walkway leads from the patio to an outdoor spa and a freestanding garage on the southwest side of the site. Related: Weathering steel wraps around a solar-powered California home In addition to a 10 kWh photovoltaic array on the roof, the cabin relies on radiant underfloor heating and an energy recovery ventilation system; both systems can be monitored and adjusted remotely. Energy-efficient aluminum-clad wood windows and doors were installed, as is a Tesla Powerwall for electric vehicle charging. + Coates Design Architects Images via Coates Design Architects

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This beautiful Washington cabin meets net-zero targets even in extreme temperatures

Timber-clad modern home in New York takes a sensitive approach to the landscape

September 11, 2018 by  
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When an experimental modern dance choreographer tapped Anik Pearson Architects to design and build a legacy family compound in Upstate New York , the New York City-based firm took to the challenge by not only finding an appropriate site, but also designing the master plan, which includes the recently completed main house. Clad in timber and set on a steep slope, the spacious abode prioritizes low-maintenance care, sensitivity to the environment and energy-efficient design. In addition to the use of naturally resilient materials, the Hammersley Ridge Overlook, or House in Wingdale, uses a ventilated facade system to effectively seal the building envelope against water and air while maintaining an indoor-outdoor connection. When Anik Pearson was tasked with finding the site, she was bound by the requirements that the property be easily accessible from New York City via public transit and within easy reach of hiking trails. The answer came in a 68-acre lot in Upstate New York near the Appalachian Trail and the Hammersley Hill Nature Conservancy. The master plan, created in collaboration with a landscape architect, called for various site infrastructural improvements as well as a large family compound — including a main house, a guesthouse, a caretaker’s house and a dance studio — that would be completed in phases over the course of a few decades. Built for multi-generational use, the House in Wingdale is defined on one side by a three-story external ramp that connects the ground floor with the sleeping porches and a green rooftop terrace. The house is built from a combination of timbers with traditional materials that include whitewashed board paneling, white cedar , walnut and oak, as well as copper, granite and glazed encaustic tile. In contrast to the muted facade, the light-filled interiors feature bright pops of color inspired by the owner’s bright dinnerware. Large windows and a screened-in porch help bring the outdoors in. Related: Curvaceous Ex of In House is a solar-powered guest residence aligned with the natural world “The main house is designed to promote a connection to the land and to the outdoors through an external ramp linking balconies, porches and a terraced green roof ,” reads the project statement. “Sensitivity to the site is observed through water conservation, absorption and recapturing. On the structures, emphasis is given to energy efficiency and ease of maintenance through naturally resilient materials and assemblies.” + Anik Pearson Architects Images via Anik Pearson Architects

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Timber-clad modern home in New York takes a sensitive approach to the landscape

A sleek artist studio with Passive House elements projects over a cliff

September 10, 2018 by  
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Montreal-based MU Architecture recently completed a minimalist and modern artist studio that boasts dramatic landscape views of Lake Deauville and the Laurentians’ mountainous countryside in Quebec, Canada. Conceived as a multipurpose extension , the Workshop on a Cliff covers more than 5,000 square feet of space and includes two superimposed garages, a workshop, a spacious creative room as well as a mezzanine level. The building is partially elevated on thin pillars so as not to disturb the tree line. Oriented toward the north and views of the lake, the Workshop on a Cliff takes cues from the countryside vernacular with its barn-inspired gabled form. The exterior is clad is pre-aged gray wood, and the thick exterior walls were built to meet the standards of Passive House construction. Overhangs and superior insulation were a must given the harsh climate in this region of Quebec. Joined with the main residence by a cantilevered bridge, the artist studio’s connection with the surrounding forest is echoed not only in its timber material palette but also in its series of supporting inclined columns that are arranged to evoke tree trunks. A massive glazed gable end wall is partly sheltered by a roof overhang and lets plenty of natural light and views into the interior, which is mostly open-plan with minimalist detailing to keep the focus on the outdoors. Timber cladding on the interior is paired with highly reflective polished concrete flooring. A mezzanine is set in the rear of the building. Related: Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape “Spacious but intimate, the interior volume accommodates large formats of paintings,” the architects said. “The minimalist play of surfaces and the rigor of the alignments put the artist’s work in scene and supports his concentration. The Workshop on a Cliff is a place of expression where architecture immerses us in creative inspiration and Nature contemplation.” + MU Architecture Images by Ulysse Lemerise Bouchard

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A sleek artist studio with Passive House elements projects over a cliff

This sustainable dog house has a green roof and solar-powered fan to keep cool

September 7, 2018 by  
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Green design has touched every aspect of our world, and now even our little furry friends can play their part in living a sustainable lifestyle. Californian firm  Studio Schicketanz has designed a sustainable dog house made with eco-friendly materials that boasts some pretty incredible features. The timber canine cottage has a side green-carpeted ramp that leads up to the green roof , which is installed with a motion-activated water faucet and irrigation system. The architects created the dreamy dog house to be both functional and sustainable. The design was inspired by the firm’s focus on creating “landscape, architecture and interior design with a focused emphasis on livability.” Related: Y-town recycled old refrigerator into a dog house for adopted pup The main volume of the dog house is a traditional box shape with a slightly slanted roof. Inside, the sleeping space is equipped with a built-in floor drain for easy cleaning. Additionally, there is a solar-powered fan that keeps the canines cool during the day. Doggies can also keep an eye on any visitors thanks to tiny peekaboo windows on either side of the home. On the exterior, a hidden compartment stores toys, treats and additional accessories. A green-covered ramp leads up to the green roof, which was integrated into the design to encourage dogs to enjoy some fresh air from the comfort of their own personal space. Adding to the dog’s comfort is a motion-activated water spout on the roof to keep the precious pooches well-hydrated while they people watch from above. To reduce water waste , the drinking fountain is connected to an irrigation system. Related: How to build a green dog house The eco-friendly dog shelter will be on display at the Carmel Canine Cottages Competition from September 11 through September 15. After the event, the structure will be auctioned off, with all funds going to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). + Studio Schicketanz Via Apartment Therapy Images via Studio Schicketanz

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This sustainable dog house has a green roof and solar-powered fan to keep cool

Stow away on this stylish, minimalist floating hotel in London

September 7, 2018 by  
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If you’re looking for a more unique place to lay your head on your next trip to London , look no further than the Boathouse London , a stylish floating hotel docked on a city canal. Created in partnership with home design brand Made , this bespoke botel and event space on the water was fashioned as “an industrial-style barge turned contemporary bolthole” with help from interior designer Katie Hanton. Kitted out in Scandinavian-inspired style, the chic getaway comes with customizable experiences, from a boat driver who can steer you around the canals to a special dinner prepared by a local chef. Spanning 60 feet wide and constructed by local boat builders, the barge cuts a contemporary silhouette compared to its more traditional canal boat cousins. In contrast to its sleek black exterior, the botel interior is warm and cozy with reclaimed wood paneling throughout and an airy, open-plan layout. A neutral color palette dressed in furniture by Made and peppered with greenery creates inviting and relaxed vibes. Guests also have the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors with a generously sized deck above or with the provided bicycles and rowboat. The bathroom and bedroom are tucked in the rear of the boat . The minimalist living area comes with a kitchen, snug dining area (additional seating can be found on the deck) and a lounge with a sofa that can be converted into a second bed. The Boathouse London is currently docked in London’s first floating park near Little Venice atop Grand Union Canal in Paddington Basin, about a five-minute walk from Edgware Road tube station. Related: Floating lantern-like church and community hub may set sail on London’s canals “We’re hugely excited to be working with Made.com, and we couldn’t ask for a better fit — our aim is to create a range of beautifully designed, stylish, modern spaces on the water, each with their own individual twist — and breaking away from the traditional idea of a canal boat,” explained CEO and Founder Cara Louise Furby. Prices for The Boathouse London start at £220 per night with breakfast and Wi-Fi included. + The Boathouse London Images via The Boathouse London

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Stow away on this stylish, minimalist floating hotel in London

Wooden skyscraper city proposed for Stockholms most eco-friendly neighborhood

September 5, 2018 by  
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When Anders Berensson Architects was tapped by the Stockholm Center Party to design a new Stockholm neighborhood that would be the densest, tallest and most environmentally friendly in the city, the Swedish architecture firm responded with Masthamnen, a skinny timber “skyscraper city” elevated atop traditional city blocks. The mixed-use proposal includes a combination of residential, office and retail spaces in a pedestrian-friendly environment integrated with public parkland that connects the new district with the surrounding hilly landscape and urban fabric. Located in a valley between three hills, Masthamnen is organized into three main parts: a lower block city on the same level as today’s dock levels; an elevated timber “ skyscraper city” on top; and a series of landscaped roofs and bridges that link the development to the hilly terrain. The lower section would comprise 19 new city blocks ranging from six to 10 floors. In total, these blocks would contain 2,500 apartments, 60,000 square meters of office space and nearly 100 shops and restaurants. The wooden skyscraper city elevated atop these blocks would consist of 31 new skinny wooden skyscrapers ranging between 25 and 35 floors to include approximately 3,000 apartments with an estimated 30 shops and restaurants. Views are prioritized in the design and layout, and each skyscraper is given sufficient clearance to avoid obstructing views. Cross-laminated timber would be used as the primarily building material. Related: Nation’s first large-scale mass timber residence hall breaks ground in Arkansas “When entering the new city area you will often be at the same height as the roofs of the new district,” Anders Berensson Architects added. “Therefore we have chosen to propose a Public Park on all roofs of the lower block city and connect them with bridges. The roofs and bridges form a large public landscape that binds together all beautiful high situated promenade trails that already exist on eastern Södermalm. This way, we also make eastern Södermalm easier and more beautiful to have a stroll on.” + Anders Berensson Architects Images via Anders Berensson Architects

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Wooden skyscraper city proposed for Stockholms most eco-friendly neighborhood

Energy-savvy art museum is anchored atop a historic Dutch dike

September 4, 2018 by  
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Rising out of a historic dike, the new Lisser Art Museum pays homage to the landscape’s context while offering a new contemporary cultural destination in Lisse, The Netherlands. Dutch architecture firm KVDK architecten headed the recently completed project and embraced smart, sustainable solutions from the optimization of natural daylighting to gray water collection systems. Wrapped in earth-colored Petersen bricks, the modest, light-filled building feels like an extension of the forest, and ample glazing provides connection with nature on all sides. Commissioned by the VandenBroek Foundation, the small-scale museum is located in the Keukenhof, a former country estate dating from the 17th century that had featured a terraced garden with an artificial dike — unique in the Netherlands at the time. The estate was later redesigned in 1860 by landscape architects J.D. and L.P. Zocher, who transformed it into a cultural park that has since achieved national heritage status. The recently completed museum was an addition in the Keukenhof cultural park masterplan drafted in 2010. “One ingenious but also complicated strategy involved placing the foundations in the historical dike core, thereby making the museum the pivot point between a landscaped approach, the historical terraced landscape, the open sandy area and the wooded dune ridge,” the architects explained. “Intensive consultation and careful dimensioning ensured that the plan for a museum on this sensitive spot was wholeheartedly embraced by the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, the government body that oversees the register of national monuments.” Related: Daan Roosegaarde uses light art to breathe new life into an iconic Dutch dike The museum comprises two main volumes, the lower of which is set into the dike — glass curtain walls emphasize and embrace the land form — and supports the upper, cantilevered volume enclosed in brick . The interior is flexible with multipurpose spaces and follow the Guggenheim principle in which visitors experience all the exhibition spaces by winding down from the highest point. In addition to natural lighting, the museum is equipped with thermal energy storage, a green roof and a gray water system for toilets. The museum depot is located inside of the dike to take advantage of the earth’s natural cooling properties. + KVDK architecten Via ArchDaily Images by Sjaak Henselmans and Ronald Tilleman

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Energy-savvy art museum is anchored atop a historic Dutch dike

Beautiful, light-filled home slots into a skinny lot in Vancouver

September 3, 2018 by  
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Faced with a unique lot size of 20 by 200 feet, Canadian design studio Randy Bens Architect was challenged to create a home with a sense of expansiveness despite the property’s back lane-like dimensions. Tapped by boutique builder Moosehead Contracting, the architects teamed up with Falken Reynolds Interiors to complete the Saint George House, a project that proves that beautiful and innovative design is possible even on challenging sites. Interested buyers and design lovers will get the chance to tour the modern home next month during Vancouver’s Interior Design Show. Spanning an area of 2,200 square feet, the Saint George House is split into two volumes, both of which are clad in standing-seam metal and topped with a slanted roof. The lower level houses an open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen and also spills out to a sunny deck with ample entertaining space through massive sliding glass doors. The larger upper volume cantilevers over the deck and contains the private areas, including three bedrooms. Bringing natural light indoors was key to making the home feel spacious, as was the minimalist, Scandinavian-inspired palette of white walls and light-colored timber. Boasting a style that Falken Reynolds Interiors calls “Canadian Nordic,” the bright and airy home is furnished with Bocci lighting, Corian Solid Surface and Quartz, and Bensen furniture with exclusive Raf Simons fabrics. Pops of color, warm textures and connection with the outdoors help establish the home’s cozy character. Related: Couple builds dream solar-powered home on an awkward lot in Rotterdam “The unique site of the 2,200-square-foot (204-square-meter) Saint George Street house inspired us to get creative with our design process and visually create more space,” said Chad Falkenberg, principal of Falken Reynolds. “For example, natural light was a big focus, so we strategically placed 11 skylights to wash walls with natural light and draw the eye into the room, amplifying spaciousness using the technique of Atmospheric Perspective.” + Randy Bens Architect Images by Ema Peters

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Beautiful, light-filled home slots into a skinny lot in Vancouver

This beautiful tiny home doubles as a tasty doughnut shop

August 31, 2018 by  
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Although we’ve seen a lot of tiny homes from Tiny Heirloom that make our design-loving hearts flutter, its latest masterpiece is making our mouths water. The prolific tiny home builders have just unveiled the ‘Kentucky Donut Shop’ — a compact structure that has been custom designed to let the owners of KY Son Eats bakery make and sell their doughnuts from one beautiful, sophisticated tiny house. The gorgeous tiny home and doughnut bakery was custom built for a couple who dreamed of selling their tasty products from a home on wheels. Tiny home design is challenging at any level, but the team at Tiny Heirloom went above and beyond to create a 275-square-foot space that would enable the owners to run a business without sacrificing the comforts of home. Related: Tiny Heirloom unveils ‘The Goose’ — a custom tiny home with stunning interiors From the outside, the tiny house looks like any other compact living space on wheels. Built on a 34-foot-long trailer, the exterior is clad in cedar siding, with the exception of the blue panels that frame the front door. On the interior, pine tongue and groove panels, engineered wood flooring and a beetle kill ceiling create a cabin-like aesthetic. The living area is flooded with natural light thanks to an abundance of windows. At the heart of the home is the professional-grade kitchen , which features stainless steel countertops and top-of-the-line appliances, such as a large baker’s oven, various sinks and a flat-top grill. There is also a microwave, deep fryer and large refrigerator. To avoid clutter and keep the shop organized, there is plenty of shelving space. As impressive as the spacious baker’s kitchen is, the designers didn’t sacrifice on the family’s main living areas when building the tiny home. Adjacent to the professional kitchen is the living room, which has a comfy couch and a small kitchenette, so the family can make a quick snack without having to use the larger kitchen. The home’s two bedrooms are located on sleeping lofts reached by two small ladders that can be stowed away when not in use. Now, the talented family can fully enjoy their time at home, even when they are hard at work. + KySon Eats Bakery + Tiny Heirloom Via New Atlas Images via Tiny Heirloom

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This beautiful tiny home doubles as a tasty doughnut shop

A charming net-zero cottage in Cornwall asks $845K

August 30, 2018 by  
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A sweet English cottage that has been treated to a sustainable transformation has recently hit the market for £650,000 (approximately $845,000 USD). Set within 11 acres of a private nature reserve in the small town of Lostwithiel in Cornwall , England, this beautiful retreat offers an idyllic return to nature with a minimized environmental footprint. Updated by Guy Stansfeld Architects , the zero-energy home is powered by solar energy as well as a ground-source heat pump for heating and hot water. Spanning an area of 2,100 square feet, the home was renovated by the current owner Guy Stansfeld, who breathed new life into the historic yet decaying estate cottage over the course of four years. The house, dubbed Rosedale, has been restored in white stucco and re-organized to follow an open-plan, double-height layout spread out across a single level with four bedrooms. Completed in 2015, the updated home’s modern interiors are filled with natural light and views of the outdoors, which includes vistas of wetlands, woodland, a garden and a pond. Blonde wood paneling, vaulted ceilings and white surfaces help create an airy atmosphere. Stansfeld added an extension built with SIPs for speed of construction and superior insulation. There’s also a kitchen garden area and ample parking for cars. Related: This dream job lets you live on a Cornish island with a medieval castle All the fixtures and lighting in the home were selected for their low energy consumption. Radiant floor heating also keeps energy bills to a minimum. Since Rosedale is powered with photovoltaic panels , Stansfeld has tapped into the local feed-in tariff to recoup his electricity costs by selling surplus energy to the National Grid. This effectively brings the well-insulated dwelling to net-zero energy status. The Rosedale property is now on the market and listed through Savills with the real estate agent Ben Davis for £650,000. + Guy Stansfeld Architects Images via Savills

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A charming net-zero cottage in Cornwall asks $845K

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