This concept camper van brings luxury to off-roading #vanlife

October 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Camper vans have been around for generations, but after 5 minutes of watching traffic in any national park, you’ll see that they have come a long way since the Volkswagen version that was once ubiquitous along surfing coastlines. Sprinter vans, common in today’s #vanlife era, are a model of van produced by Mercedes-Benz. Other manufacturers are pumping out similar designs to keep up with the trend, and each company has its own spin on the concept with an optimized combination of minimization, comfort and maneuverability. Hymer, a German company, has recently revealed its vision of a luxury camper van for 2025 and beyond — the VisionVenture. Imagine a sleek apartment compressed into an off-road vehicle, and you have the basis for the VisionVenture. Equipped for comfort, it offers sleeping areas, a sleek bathroom and plenty of seating alongside 4×4 capabilities that allow you to escape the crowds. Related: This camper van features not just one, but two sleeping pods in its cozy interior The concept car starts with the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van grille, doors and lights and adapts the rest of the front end for additional space by pushing out the windshield and redesigning the canopy and engine hood. This change creates better flow and a more open feel between the cab and the center of the van . The kitchen is anchored around a central stairway with built-in storage that leads to a pop-up bedding solution with upper insulation and quick-respond temperature control. The main living area welcomes in natural light through large side windows and a rear door, which opens to create a covered terrace complete with a pull-out barbecue station. There’s even space for a full-capacity bathroom with a toilet, shower and sink that can be collapsed against the wall for more space. Lush interior decor adds to the feeling of home with spacious couches that can be converted into additional bedding, wall decor, shelving, lighting and accessories for all your digital needs. While the idea is comfort coupled with the ability to go remote, the designers included some sustainable technology into the project as well with wheel arch fairings and other body parts manufactured by 3D printers. The system also includes photovoltaic components for low-impact, off-grid power production. + Hymer Via Geek.com Images via Hymer

View original post here:
This concept camper van brings luxury to off-roading #vanlife

Sail your cares away in this incredible floating villa near Sydney

October 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Nothing says romance like floating down a calm waterway while taking in the sound of bird calls from the shores. If you’re in the mood for a romantic getaway near Sydney , this incredible floating villa is the perfect choice. The tiny retreat features enough space for two lovebirds, who can spend their days watching the world go by from a glorious open-air deck. Ready to set sail along the pristine coastline of Palm Beach, New South Wales, this beautiful, two-story floating villa makes for a dream glamping retreat. The structure is compact but comes with a stunning, modern design that makes the space seem much bigger. Related: Sail away from it all in this gorgeous floating tiny home The interior of the floating home features a large living area on the first floor that opens up to the structure’s most impressive space, the outdoor deck. From here, guests can enjoy stunning views of the cliffs and wild landscapes found along the coast of Palm Beach. The deck comes with plenty of seating space and a barbecue, where you can cook shrimp on the, well, you know. Throughout the interior, guests will feel right at home thanks to contemporary furnishings and amenities. The living space welcomes in plenty of natural light through various windows and the folding glass doors that open up to the deck . The living area even comes with a nice fireplace for those chilly nights. A compact bathroom nearby includes a full-sized shower and toiletries. Additionally, the home comes with a kitchenette, which comes with all of the basics to whip up a tasty meal: an oven, a stove, a microwave and a fridge. The master bedroom is located on the sleeping loft, accessible via a narrow staircase. The pitched roof adds extra vertical space for the bedroom, which comes with a plush, king-sized bed and quality linens. Guests to the tiny villa will enjoy a healthy breakfast each morning as well as a 24-hour concierge service. For active travelers, the accommodation also comes with the use of the stand-up paddleboards and fishing gear. + Glamping Hub Images via Glamping Hub

Here is the original post:
Sail your cares away in this incredible floating villa near Sydney

Nearly 300 trees transform a football stadium into Austrias largest public art installation

October 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

An extraordinary forest has taken root in an unexpected place—the Wörthersee football Stadium in Klagenfurt, Austria. Designed by Swiss artist Klaus Littmann in collaboration by Enea Landscape Architecture, the temporary art intervention — titled FOR FOREST — The Unending Attraction of Nature — consists of nearly 300 native Central European trees, with some weighing up to six tons each. Free to visit, the monumental art installation is Austria’s largest public art installation to date and was created to call attention to climate change and deforestation. The idea for FOR FOREST was inspired by Austrian artist and architect Max Peintner’s ’The Unending Attraction of Nature,’ a 1970 pencil drawing that shows a hyper-industrialized dystopian world so ruined by deforestation that trees have been reduced to objects on display in a stadium. FOR FOREST recreates the image on a grand scale in the Wörthersee Stadium, which can seat up to 30,000 spectators, that now contains a diverse range of tree species including silver birch, alder, aspen, white willow, hornbeam, field maple and common oak. “Rallying in support of today’s most pressing issues on climate change and deforestation, FOR FOREST aims to challenge our perception of nature and question its future,” reads a statement in the press release. “It seeks to become a memorial, reminding us that nature, which we so often take for granted, may someday only be found in specially designated spaces, as is already the case with animals in zoos.” Related: Psychedelic installation in NYC spotlights environmental issues with immersive art The art installation is open to the public from 10 am until 10 pm daily and is illuminated at night by floodlights. The temporary and free intervention will end on October 27, 2019, after which the forest will be carefully replanted on a public site near the stadium , where it will serve as a “living forest sculpture.” A pavilion will be erected to document the project as well. + FOR FOREST Images © Gerhard Maurer and Unimo

Original post:
Nearly 300 trees transform a football stadium into Austrias largest public art installation

Ecosistema Urbano designs a digitally integrated eco-campus for the University of Malaga

October 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The University of Malaga in Spain will soon be home to a high-tech campus that will redefine the urban fabric with digital connectivity and renewable energy systems. Designed by Ecosistema Urbano to regenerate the underused Louis Pasteur Boulevard area, the project will not only enhance the city’s infrastructure, but it will also create new spaces where everyday university activities, including classes, can take place in public areas. Spanning a total surface area of 52 acres, the Malaga University Campus planning project will improve the climatic comfort and digital connectivity of currently underused public spaces. The plan targets four main strategies: a Connected Campus strategy for opening the university to its urban surroundings; a Green Campus strategy that seeks to create, restore and enhance existing green space; an Interactive Campus strategy that will allow users to visualize real-time information and manipulate physical aspects of public space with technology; and an Open Campus strategy to make educational meeting spaces and devices in the public areas available for use by both students and local citizens. Using a network of sensors and interactive technologies, the outdoor spaces can be manipulated to support both educational and playful programming, as well as improved outdoor comfort that can be enhanced with solar-powered climate conditioning systems. Related: Ecosistema Urbano’s amazing LED Energy Carousel is powered by play “One of the key aspects of this project is its commitment to using technology as a way of improving the interaction between people and the environment,” explained the architects, who were inspired by the smart cities approach. “It will be the first public space that users can control through an application. In parallel with the construction of the project, the official UMA app will be extended with open source modules that will allow access to an augmented environment of interactivity and information.” To reduce the environmental footprint of the project, the architects have proposed installing photovoltaic panels to power the campus’ bioclimatic conditioning systems, such as evaporative cooling and geothermal air circulation. Passive bioclimatic strategies will also be used, including shading elements like green walls and sculptural canopies. The first construction phase, which covers 17 acres, is planned for December 2020. + Ecosistema Urbano Images via Ecosistema Urbano

Continued here:
Ecosistema Urbano designs a digitally integrated eco-campus for the University of Malaga

Mirage Architecture envisions a solar-powered glass cube for Lithuanias national concert hall

October 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

In response to an international design competition for Lithuania’s National Concert Hall in Vilnius, Iranian architecture firm Mirage Architecture Studio designed a conceptual solar-powered venue sheathed in a double skin facade. Dubbed Tautos Namai, the cuboid building proposal houses art inside and out — the exterior transforms into a vibrant artwork at night with holographic displays. Per the competition’s brief for sustainability, the conceptual project would not only produce more energy than it uses but would also minimize site impact and be built of recycled materials. In February 2019, the Vilnius City Municipality announced an international competition for a concert hall to be located on Tauras Hill, a popular park that offers a sweeping view of the city. To preserve the proportions of the old trade union palace and reflect the natural surroundings, Mirage Architecture Studio proposed a glass cube with a transparent outer shell and an opaline inner shell.  Related: Steven Holl’s solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old “One reflecting the outside, and the other reflecting the enigmatic atmosphere inside,” explained the architects of the facade. “These glasses are made of photovoltaic tiles and produce a wide range of solar energy . So, in addition to creating a sense of belonging in the unconscious of the audience, an inexpressive and semi-transparent state of truth within it appears in mind. And all of this happens on the daytime. But at night time, the project has another story to tell. The Lithuanian National Music House is shining like a diamond using more than 18,000 holographic display; thus, the building’s appearance will never be reiterative at night, displaying a variety of surreal and abstract images.” The multifunctional, 550-capacity concert hall would be tucked underground, while the above-ground spaces could be used for artist workshops, training venues and other purposes. To reduce environmental impact, structural materials would be recycled from the previous building on site, site impact would be minimized wherever possible and recycled natural materials would be used for acoustic padding on the walls of the hall. Mirage Architecture’s submission did not win the competition; Spanish architecture firm Arquivo was recently announced the winner. Still, the design is an innovative way to combine solar power and art under one roof. + Mirage Architecture Studio Images via Mirage Architecture Studio

Read the original post: 
Mirage Architecture envisions a solar-powered glass cube for Lithuanias national concert hall

LEED Platinum Sitka captures the Pacific Northwest spirit with a lush, fog-enabled courtyard

October 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Local architectural practice Runberg Architecture Group has raised the bar for sustainable design in Seattle with the completion of Sitka, a LEED Platinum-certified multifamily development on target to achieve Seattle’s 2030 Challenge for Planning goals of reducing water and energy use. Built to use nearly a third less energy than the typical baseline design, the 384-unit development features numerous energy-saving systems — Sitka is the nation’s first multifamily project to use a Wastewater Heat Recovery system — as well as a stunning courtyard that mimics the Pacific Northwest landscape with a running stream, tree-covered hilltops and a lounge that resembles a treehouse. Located in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, Sitka is a seven-story building centered on an outdoor courtyard. Runberg Architecture Group drew inspiration from Northwest Modernism and the landscapes of the nearby San Juan Islands to create the project. A sloping green roof and rooftop community garden help capture stormwater runoff as well. The tree-filled courtyard also features a fog system and a treehouse, designed by Seattle’s Lead Pencil Studio, that includes a working fireplace with views of the courtyard. Related: Energy-efficient house embraces panoramic views of Puget Sound “Our mission is to design places where people want to be,” said Brian Runberg of the project’s human-centered design. “When creating Sitka, we asked ourselves what was missing from most of South Lake Union — what would make people feel good about spending time here — and it was green space . We wanted to create an oasis for residents and neighbors in the midst of the hard cityscape.” To minimize energy usage, the architects strategically broke up the building mass to allow natural light and ventilation into the courtyard and interiors. The development also includes LED lighting, EnergyStar appliances, recycled and locally sourced materials, low-flow toilets and fixtures and a high-efficiency 14-foot-diameter fan in the fitness center, all of which contribute to the development’s energy goals. + Runberg Architecture Group Images by Christophe Servieres and Michael Walmsley via Runberg Architecture Group

Continued here: 
LEED Platinum Sitka captures the Pacific Northwest spirit with a lush, fog-enabled courtyard

Yosemite camping site unveils series of ADA-compliant tiny cabins

September 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Yosemite camping site unveils series of ADA-compliant tiny cabins

Taking a vacation in a tiny cabin in a remote area of the world appeals to all sorts of people, but there’s one group who has been largely left out of the movement — people with disabilities. Thankfully, one forward-thinking firm is changing that with their sleek tiny cabin design that is accessible for all. Los Angeles-based firm, M-Rad has unveiled their new X-suite cabin, an accessible tiny retreat that combines universal design with sophisticated aesthetic. Built specifically for Autocamp Yosemite, a 35-acre glamping site in northern California, the firm installed five X- suite cabins on the edge of a small lake, surrounded by the breathtaking Yosemite landscape. The cabins are all designed to comply with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA). Related: Wheelchair-friendly tiny house proves universal design can be cool The 270-square-foot prefabricated cabins have wooden frames wrapped in  dark-hued metal rainscreens topped with metal roofs. Designed to be transportable, the cabins sit on top of steel chassis with wheels. This enables the cabins to not only be moved easier to another location, but also reduces impact on the landscape. The entrance to each cabin is through a wooden open-air deck that doubles as a ramp. Double-entry French doors that are wide enough for large wheelchairs lead into the interior living space. The interior of the cabins feature rectangular layouts, with a large open-plan living area and a kitchen. Ultra-large glazed walls flood the interior with natural light.  The bedroom, which has enough space for a queen-sized bed, not only has a massive floor-to-ceiling window, but an oversized skylight that allows for stargazing while drifting off to sleep. The kitchens offer all of the necessary amenities that are on a reachable level, as well as a small dining area on the interior. The open-air decks also feature enough space for dining al fresco while enjoying the incredible views. Although the cabins may seem to be a minimalist design, in reality, the cabins were purpose-built to be accessible for everyone without sacrificing on design. Large, spacious thresholds, as well as wide rooms, allow enough space for wheelchairs to turn around in. Additionally, the bathroom was built to adhere to ADA standards such as a shower with a handlebar and seat. Throughout the home, windows, doors, knobs, etc. are also ADA compliant. + M-Rad Via Dezeen Images via M-Rad

See the rest here:
Yosemite camping site unveils series of ADA-compliant tiny cabins

Spectacular rammed-earth dome home is tucked deep into a Costa Rican jungle

September 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Spectacular rammed-earth dome home is tucked deep into a Costa Rican jungle

Costa Rica has long been renowned for its commitment to protecting its natural environment, but one home nestled into 2.5 acres of a permaculture farm is really setting an example for green building. Located in the idyllic area of Diamante Valley, the House Without Shoes is an incredible rammed-earth complex made up of three interconnected domes, which are joined by an open-air deck that looks out over the stunning valley and ocean views. Measuring a total of 2,000 square feet, the House Without Shoes is comprised of three domes that were constructed with bags of rammed earth. All of the domes feature custom-made arched windows and wood frames with screens. They also have skylights that allow natural light to flood the interior spaces. Related: Biophilic dome homes produce more energy than they consume The main dome , which is approximately 22-feet high, houses the primary living area as well as the dining room and kitchen. A beautiful spiral staircase leads up to the second floor, which has enough space for a large office as well as an open-air, 600-square-foot deck that provides spectacular views of the valley leading out to the ocean. The two smaller domes, which house the bedrooms, are separated by the main dome by an outdoor platform. The rammed-earth construction of the structures keeps the interior spaces naturally cool in the summer and warm in the winter. In addition to its tight thermal mass, the home operates on a number of passive and active design principles. The home’s water supply comes from multiple springs found in the valley. Gray water from the sinks and shower are funneled into a collection system that is used for irrigation. At the moment, the house runs on the town’s local grid but has its own self-sustaining system set up. The domes are set in a remote area, tucked into the highest point of a 60-acre organic, permaculture farm in the Diamante Valley. Not only is the house surrounded by breathtaking natural beauty and abundant wildlife, but it also enjoys the benefits of organic gardening. The vast site is separated into three garden areas that are planted with everything from yucca and mango to coco palms and perennial greens, not to mention oodles of fresh herbs. + SuperAdobe Dome Home Images via Makenzie Gardner

See the rest here:
Spectacular rammed-earth dome home is tucked deep into a Costa Rican jungle

Snhetta completes worlds northernmost energy-positive building

September 16, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Snhetta completes worlds northernmost energy-positive building

Snøhetta has once again raised the bar for sustainable architecture with its completion of Powerhouse Brattørkaia, the world’s northernmost energy-positive building located in the Norwegian city of Trondheim. Designed with a sloped roof topped with photovoltaic panels, the eight-story, 18,000-square-meter office building produces, on average, more than twice as much electricity as it consumes daily. It feeds surplus renewable energy to neighboring buildings and the city transit system through a local micro-grid. The extremely energy-efficient structure has also received BREEAM Outstanding certification. Powerhouse Brattørkaia was created by the Powerhouse, a collaboration between Snøhetta, property company Entra, entrepreneur Skanska, environmental organization ZERO and the consulting company Asplan Viak to bring energy-positive buildings to Norway and the world. The group was also responsible for Norway’s first energy-positive building, Powerhouse Kjørbo. Per Powerhouse’s strict guidelines, all Powerhouse buildings are designed to produce more energy than they consume over their lifetimes — including construction, demolition and embodied energy, factors that are not normally included when considering energy usage. Related: Harvard unveils Snøhetta-designed HouseZero for sustainable, plus-energy living “Energy-positive buildings are the buildings of the future,” said Snøhetta founder Kjetil Trædal Thorsen. “The mantra of the design industry should not be ‘form follows function’ but ‘form follows environment.’ This means that the design thinking of today should focus on environmental considerations and reducing our footprint first, and have the design follow this premise.” Located by the waterfront in a city that receives little sunshine in the winter, Powerhouse Brattørkaia is wrapped in black aluminum and almost 3,000 square meters of solar panels to ensure maximum exposure to the sun throughout the day and the seasons. The building footprint also includes ample energy storage to supplement demand in winter. The building is equipped with other energy-efficient features, such as superior insulation, heat recovery solutions, seawater-driven heating and cooling systems and optimized access to natural light. + Snøhetta Photography by Ivar Kvaal via Snøhetta

View original here:
Snhetta completes worlds northernmost energy-positive building

Ace Hardware boosts efforts to phase out neonicotinoid pesticides

September 16, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ace Hardware boosts efforts to phase out neonicotinoid pesticides

The world’s largest retailer-owned hardware cooperative, Ace Hardware, is becoming more “bee-friendly” by phasing out inventory products associated with neonicotinoid pesticides . Neonicotinoids — sometimes called ‘neonics’ for short — are notoriously toxic to bees. Ace Hardware’s move to distance itself from neonics is a step closer to promoting better pollinator population health. Neonicotinoids work as an insecticide by disrupting neural transmission. This is owing to neonics’ design to mimic the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Disruption of the normal activity of an insect’s central nervous system takes place when neonicotinoids bind onto its acetylcholine receptors. In doing so, insect neurons are adversely affected through over-excitation, to the point of paralysis. Repeat exposure increases neural vulnerability and toxicity so that the insect neuron is destroyed. Related: EPA lifts ban on pesticide proven to be toxic to honeybees Unfortunately, bees have higher numbers of acetylcholine receptors than other insects, thereby occasioning their increased susceptibility to neonicotinoids. What’s more, bees have fewer genes for detoxification, thus they are not as capable of detoxifying harmful chemicals compared to other insects. Bee exposure to neonicotinoids is rather pernicious. Studies reveal that neonics accumulate in individual bees, resulting in adverse defects in memory, flight, dance coordination, communication abilities and pollen collection effectiveness. Correspondingly, bees exposed to contaminated pollen and nectar bring them back to the nest. This exposes the colony to further risks, such as increased insect mortality, widespread susceptibility to neural disruption within the hive, erratic behavior in the colony, increased queenlessness and subsequent population decline. In light of this, Ace Hardware’s move to eliminate neonicotinoid pesticides from its store shelves sounds promising. The hardware store giant announced, “Currently, over 95 percent of the insecticide product offerings distributed by Ace Hardware Corporation are neonicotinoid-free.” More natural and organic products are being added to the Ace Hardware inventory to help bee, butterfly and other pollinator populations bounce back from the brink. Ace Hardware’s greener, more bee-friendly approach echoes that of other garden retailers like Costco, Home Depot, Lowes, Walmart and Whole Foods, all of which have expressed similar commitment to better stewardship of the environment. + Ace Hardware Via Medium Image via Pixabay

The rest is here: 
Ace Hardware boosts efforts to phase out neonicotinoid pesticides

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1239 access attempts in the last 7 days.