Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams

May 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

This   teepee-shaped home is made from twenty four interlacing beams that shelter a large open-plan living space. Antony Gibbon Designs ‘ ORKA house explores different geometric shapes and unconventional forms for residential architecture. The three-story dwelling features a rooftop platform with panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. The house has twenty four wooden beams that coalesce, forming a pivoted illusion which transforms angles into a seemingly curved hyperboloid form. Using the frame as an aesthetic starting point, the architects interlaced the beams to naturally create diamond-shaped patterns. These patterns become part of the geometry and symmetry of the structure. Related: This charred wood cabin can be rearranged in an infinite number of ways The envelope wraps around an area 10 meters in diameter (33 feet), allowing for a large open-plan living space. A spiral staircase connects the ground floor to another three floors, with the top floor doubling as an outdoor viewing platform and balcony offering panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. + Antony Gibbon Designs

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Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams

Architect designs solar-powered research center to save dying Lake Chad

May 22, 2017 by  
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Lake Chad in Africa spanned over 770,000 square miles in 50,000 B.C., according to Cameroon -based architecture firm Hermann Kamte & Associates (HKA). But over the centuries it has shrunk, dwindling to a mere 1,544 square miles in 2001. HKA hopes to use architecture to jumpstart regeneration of the dying lake in the form of a desalination and research center called The Forgotten – Dead or Alive. The center would begin a process that would eventually be handed over to nature . The first humans made their home near Lake Chad, according to HKA, but this body of water is in danger of disappearing forever. It could die out in this century if no steps are taken to preserve it. Lake Chad – bordered by Cameroon, Chad, Nigeria, and Niger – is vital to the health of the region; HKA says its disappearance would impact over nine million people nearby, and indirectly, 30 million people in the region. Related: Green-roofed wooden tower in Lagos maximizes daylight and natural ventilation So they designed a center to help keep the lake alive. The self-sufficient Limnology Center would offer a location for researchers to study Lake Chad and the surrounding region. A desalination center onsite would actually connect the lake to the Atlantic Ocean via pipelines , which would transport water from the ocean. The desalination center would treat the saltwater so it could be reused as fresh water to help restore Lake Chad and provide a source of water for people in the region. HKA designed the center to have an amphibian-like form to blend in with the lake surroundings. They envision three stages to help revitalize the lake, beginning with the center and then slowly transitioning the job over to nature. Construction of the pipelines and lake research would take place between 2016 and 2026. In 2020 trees and vegetation will be planted around the lake. The greenery will eventually take over the job of regeneration; in 2080 pipelines will stop bringing in Atlantic Ocean water as natural regeneration takes over thanks to a thriving woodland. + Hermann Kamte & Associates Images courtesy of Hermann Kamte & Associates

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Architect designs solar-powered research center to save dying Lake Chad

These minimalist prefab cabins are designed for human "recharging"

May 22, 2017 by  
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Innovative charging stations for cars or electronics are a dime a dozen these days, but finally, one savvy Danish company has created a place where people can go to recharge their own batteries. Known for their simplistic metal and ceramic homeware line, Danish retailer Vipp is now venturing into the minimalistic dwellings sector with Shelter, a prefabricated monochromatic cabin designed to serve as an escape from urban chaos. The 600-square-foot cabins, which retail for approximately $543,00, were designed to be nature retreats and serve as a “battery-charging station for humans”, said Kasper Egelund, head of VIPP. Much like the company’s simple, but sturdy housewares, the cabin design is elegant and minimalistic. The monochromatic metal and glass cabin easily blends into any natural setting. The rectangular structure is set on piers to reduce its impact on its location. Related: MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall On the interior, a simple open layout gives the space a quiet, serene feel. The main level houses a kitchen, a dining area, a bathroom and a small bedroom with a fireplace. A sleeping loft with a glass ceiling is reached by ladder. Floor-to-ceiling glass panels cover one full side of the structure, which not only connects the interior to the exterior, but provides optimal natural light to the living space. The steel-framed Shelter cabins are prefabricated just north of Copenhagen and take just six months to construct and only three to five days to install. The cabins even come furnished with Vipp products such as shelving, lighting, lines, soap dispensers, etc. + Vipp Via Dezeen Images via Vipp

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These minimalist prefab cabins are designed for human "recharging"

Prefabricated lakeside cabin is a beautiful exercise in restraint

May 22, 2017 by  
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Family reunions can be loud affairs, a fact that one Torontonian family patriarch with ten energetic grandkids knows well. To secure peace and quiet while staying close to visiting family, a homeowner on Ontario’s Lake Simcoe hired Superkül architects to design a retreat within a retreat—a modern kid-free cabin separate from his existing bungalow. Dubbed Pointe Cabin, the prefabricated modern dwelling is a beautiful exercise in restraint that fully embraces the outdoors. The two-bedroom, 840-square-foot Pointe Cabin is sited close to the client’s original log cottage, purchased in the 1970s, at the edge of Cook’s Bay on the southern tip of Lake Simcoe. Although the new addition contrasts with its predecessor in its contemporary design, both cabins are linked by their predominant use of timber that blends the buildings into the wooded surroundings. Natural, locally sourced , and low maintenance materials were used in the indoor and outdoor living areas and include a mixture of cedar, white oak, and spruce-pine-fir. Related: Superkül Designs Canada’s First Active House To meet cost and efficiency targets, the single-story cabin was prefabricated offsite. The factory-built wall, floor, and roof panels were trucked to the site and the home was assembled in just a few days. The two-bedroom home is connected to the original cabin with a glazed passageway and contains a private entry, kitchenette, bathroom, and wrap-around deck. Floor-to-ceiling glass frames views of the lake and the landscape. + Superkül architects Images via Superkül architects , by Shai Gil

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Prefabricated lakeside cabin is a beautiful exercise in restraint

Terrifying cliffside ‘nests’ let you live on the edge in style

May 19, 2017 by  
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A new type of cliffside dwelling, Nestinbox , is taking the vertical housing trend to new and terrifying heights. The tiny cliffside homes – inspired by birds nests – are efficient wooden “nesting boxes” that can be mounted on cliff walls as a way to bring more affordable housing into crowded areas. But the question is: would you be brave enough to live in one? The Nestinbox design was created by architects from the Swedish firm Manofactory as a solution to the skyrocketing cost of real estate around the world. Additionally, the design offers an affordable, viable alternative for growing cities that lack buildable land. According to the team of architects behind the design, Michel Silverstorm, Elisabetta Gabrielli, and Pontus Öhman, the “hanging” home design works around dwindling land issues by doing what the birds have always done since the beginning of time – live above ground. Related: These 6 jaw-dropping cliff homes will take your breath away The Nextinbox design is not only practical, but offers a sophisticated living space with all of the comforts of a traditional “ground-based” home. Steel frames are mounted into the cliff side for optimal stability, but the exterior is clad in an attractive mix of light and dark wood paneling. A simple sloping roof juts out from the cliff wall and a footbridge walkway between the structure and the cliff leads to the entrance of the home. The interior space, although compact, offers a smart floor plan that spans three floors. The living area is less than 50 square meters, but sufficient for 1 or 2 people. Along with the living space, the homes come with a kitchen and dining area, a large bedroom with adjacent studio or office space, which also could be used as a child’s room. A spiral staircase leads to the upper floors, which are flooded with natural light thanks to various windows. One side of the structure is intentionally windowless because multiple boxes can be attached to create a larger home. + Nestinbox Via Archdaily Images via Nestinbox

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Terrifying cliffside ‘nests’ let you live on the edge in style

Spherical timber teahouse hides in the treetops of Austria

May 19, 2017 by  
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Teatime is served with a side of enviable treetop views at the pod-shaped Teahouse Riedenthaln nestled in an Austrian garden. Architecture firm a-lp architektur designed the curious igloo-shaped timber hideaway as a modern interpretation of the traditional Japanese teahouse . The 10-square-meter elevated space was largely built from recycled oak wood offcuts. Located in a private garden, the spherical room serves as a place to drink tea, for hosting regression therapy clients, and as a possible sleeping area. A ramp leads up to the low and narrow entrance that opens to a light-filled and surprisingly spacious interior. Natural light fills the cave-like space through a large painted skylight and two rectangular windows. Related: Cocoon Tree: A lightweight, spherical treehouse for sustainable living The tiny teahouse retreat is raised on four black-painted pillars, made of tree trunks. Locally chopped oak timber was used as the main material for the teahouse. The wood cladding was recycled from the small timber offcuts of a local wine barrel-maker and assembled in stacks of over forty layers. The furniture, which includes a counter with a sink, window seat, and sleeping area, is also made from oak timber. + a-lp architektur Via ArchDaily Images by Christine Leuthner

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Spherical timber teahouse hides in the treetops of Austria

Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexicos Riviera Maya

May 19, 2017 by  
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Mexico’s stunning Riviera Maya looks nothing short of paradise, but its beauty has also proven a burden on ecological preservation. With the Yucatan Peninsula’s booming tourism and environmental degradation in mind, Zaha Hadid Architects designed Alai, a residential complex in the Riviera Maya that embraces luxury but still maintains low environmental impact. Inspired by local Mayan culture and architecture, the nature-filled development will also contribute to restoration of native flora and fauna. Located on a site prepped by a previous owner for an unbuilt project, Alai will minimize its environmental impact by limiting the combined footprint of all its residential buildings to less than 7 percent of the site’s total area. The architects also plan to repair the previous owner’s damage to the site. Zaha Hadid Architects will collaborate with landscape architecture firm Gross Max and use replanting to repair the landscape, reverting the remainder of the site into a natural state that includes a woodland nature reserve and coastal wetland. To this end, the architects designed an onsite botanical nursery that serves as an attraction and tool for site restoration. Related: Sleep in sustainable luxury inside this eco-friendly jungle treehouse Alai’s luxury apartments as well as sport, leisure, and wellness amenities will be set on an elevated platform just above the canopy so as to not disturb local wildlife crossings. The apartments offer four different floor typologies, all of which enjoy ample amounts of natural light, natural ventilation , private balconies, and unobstructed views to the Caribbean Sea or Nichupté Lagoon. The sinuous and textured facade draws inspiration from local Mayan masonry and the rich natural environment. + Zaha Hadid Architects Via WAN Images by firms credited in titles

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Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexicos Riviera Maya

Minimalist barn-inspired home was built as a "landscape viewing instrument"

May 18, 2017 by  
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Halifax-based firm MLS Architects has created a minimalist barn-inspired home that pays homage to the local vernacular of Lower Kingsburg, Nova Scotia. The A-frame form of the Muir Craig house takes on the traditional shape of the local barns found in the area , and was built with simplicity in mind using corrugated metal and wood on the exterior, with exposed wood framing on the interior. The entire design for the three-bedroom home with two baths was kept simple to reduce the budget and blend the design into its surroundings. The steep gabled roof is similar to those in the same area. Also in an attempt to keep things subtle, the interior living space was left open and uncomplicated in order to keep the focus on the home’s beautiful natural surroundings. In fact, according to the architects, the home was meant to be purely a “landscape viewing instrument in which every opening is subtly positioned to frame specific landscape features and nearby vernacular precedents.” Related:Barn-inspired contemporary home ages beautifully over time The minimalist design found inside the 1,400-square-foot interior of the home follows what the architects call an “outsulation” strategy. Exposed wood framing with large ceiling beams gives the interior a playful country-home feel. Baltic birch plywood , which was chosen for its durability as well as its affordability, covers the walls of the home, further blending its design into its rural setting. + MLS Architects Images via MLS Architects

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Minimalist barn-inspired home was built as a "landscape viewing instrument"

Savvy seniors are buying tiny homes to enjoy their golden years in off-grid style

May 18, 2017 by  
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There’s no rule that says tiny home living has to be just for the young. In fact, seniors are starting a new trend by investing in smaller spaces so they can live out their golden years off-grid and burden-free. Take a look after the jump at some fearless retirees who are making the most out of retirement in custom-made tiny homes. According to Tumbleweeds Houses , the latest trend in tiny home living is spawned by older adults who are looking to downsize as they grow older. For example, retiree Bette Presley recently took the tiny home leap at age 72. After deciding to minimize her lifestyle, she moved into a 166-square-foot Tumbleweed Elm cabin and hasn’t looked back since. The compact space has all of the comforts of home, but without the hassle of maintaining a larger area. Additionally, living off-grid was important to Presley and her tiny home is RVIA certified and comes equipped for solar power . Related: Genius elevator bed slides vertically on rails to maximize space in Alaskan tiny home Converting herself into a minimalist lifestyle was surprisingly easy for Presley, who told the San Luis Obispo Tribune , “We are consumers. We buy too much. We don’t need all our belongings,” she said. “I just experienced the clutter, to live in excess, and I didn’t find it particularly satisfying.” Presley is far from alone in finding joy when breaking the confines of excess. A disabled widow, Dani, bought a compact Tumbleweed shell cabin after attending a workshop and has spent a number of years building it into the accessible home of her dreams. She has built a custom wheelchair ramp that leads up to the extra-wide front door and even created a custom-made chair lift using a rock climbing harness that lifts her up to the sleeping loft. Nature-loving retiree, Adele, loved the mobile aspect of a tiny home so she invested in a tiny Tumbleweed Cypress on wheels. Not only is the cabin travel-ready, but also has a large outdoor living space, a covered porch and even a hot tub. She was even able to customize the interior with more windows in order to enjoy the beautiful views of the Oregon farm where her tiny home is parked. Tiny homes are also quite convenient for those who are still working in their later years. The famed Sausage Nonnas recently hit the road in three ultra-cute “tiny grandma homes” to deliver their world-famed sausages to lucky families during a campaign called Sausage Sunday. Via Tumbleweed Houses Images via Tumbleweed Houses, Sausage Nonnas and The Tribune

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Savvy seniors are buying tiny homes to enjoy their golden years in off-grid style

Frank Lloyd Wright architecture school grad built this beautiful desert shelter for $2K

May 17, 2017 by  
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Students at The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, Taliesin West have erected small sleeping shelters on the school’s Arizona desert property in for decades, hearkening back to the early days of the school, when young architects resided in tents as they built the permanent building. Chilean architect Jaime Inostroza just raised his own tiny shelter, and – in keeping with the famous architect’s principles – it is meant to “respond to the landscape of the Sonora desert .” Inostroza named his shelter Atalaya, which means the crow’s nest of a ship, wherein crew members can glimpse the horizon. In his design statement, Inostroza said he wanted to build a sleeping shelter that would let him “dwell within the horizon of the Alameda of the Palos Verdes.” Atalaya is 12 feet tall, the same height as many of the surrounding trees. Related: Taliesin West students built protective desert shelters using mostly local materials With just a $2,000 budget from the school – and honoring Wright’s principles of sustainable design – Inostroza incorporated local stones into his shelter, and reused an old concrete pad resting on the site as a plinth for his new structure. Western red-cedar comprises the wooden parts of the shelter, a type Inostroza chose because it can last for 25 years and was more beautiful than another type of wood he could have picked such as pine. A wall-stair provides access to a small sleeping chamber. Fabric panels intended to amplify the surrounding desert colors cover Atalaya. Inostroza also considered light and the way it changes daily in the desert; he said the site of his sleeping shelter “becomes a distiller of the light” at sunset. He went through several designs before he settled on one, which happened to be the simplest. He told azcentral.com, “I’ve learned to always be asking: What is the essence? What is here? You don’t want to impose yourself on the site, you want to exalt what is already there.” Via ArchDaily , Curbed , and azcentral.com Images © Andrew Pielage /via ArchDaily

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Frank Lloyd Wright architecture school grad built this beautiful desert shelter for $2K

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