Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather

December 2, 2021 by  
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QBO3 Architects have created Casa Ethos, a home in Puerto Rico that explores brutalist architecture, or how a home can be left uninhabited safely for long periods while still adapting to the environment. “The house is located in a wooded area in Carrillo de Guanacaste, and from the beginning it was considered to conserve the largest number of existing trees on the property,” said the architects. “This was a starting point to the integration of the house with its immediate context and concepts such as permeability, integration and the exterior-interior relationship became fundamental in the design process.” Related: Hemp and lime studio in Italy highlights sustainable living This 425-square-meter home is left uninhabited for long periods every year, so it needed to be resistant to weather and winds. “From these limitations, the idea of brutalist architecture was born,” said QBO3 Architects. “A reinforced concrete shelter with permeable membranes that adapt to the temporalities, the architectural program and the climate.” A new guest room was designed to add space, connecting the terrace on the second level. The room focuses on the preserved tree that sits at the center of the house. “[A] large opening of the new volume is proposed to focus both: the tree and the predominant view of the site, and which will be protected at the same time by elements that reduce the solar impact on the house, such as blinds and large eaves that also provide thermal comfort to the interior of the room,” QBO3 Architects said. The new guest suite is intended to create a contrast with the rest of the home but maintain the “ raw style ” of the existing materials and feel of the cement and wood structure. “Ethos House is a project that seeks to enhance the beauty of the context in which it is located, but also of the materials that compose it, in such a way that the construction techniques were worked on in a meticulous way so each material and finish was exposed in its own pure way,” said QBO3 Architects. + QBO3 Architects Images via QBO3

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Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather

Eco-friendly housing redefines Tanzanian urban architecture

October 7, 2021 by  
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The Teachers Housing for the International School of Tanganyika is a contemporary residential project by Architectural Pioneering Consultants (APC) that incorporates site-specific solutions to adapt to the vibrant tropical surroundings. Located in the rapidly growing coastal city of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania , the 12-unit apartment block serves as a model for sustainable urban architecture in the region. Often, sustainability efforts in Africa focus on rural regions, despite the rapid expansion of urban areas. This results in unsustainable infrastructure that permeates growing cities. Taking this into consideration, the architects explored ecological solutions to satisfy the needs of the residents. Related: These bioclimatic student dorms use low-cost, sustainable materials The apartment block is seamlessly embedded in the site and oriented to interact with on-site foliage and maximize views of the Indian Ocean . Lush vegetation, including the flourishing fig and tamarind trees, were fully preserved during construction and shade the spaces surrounding the project. Successful eco-friendly designs for the tropics require innovative approaches to mitigate climatic factors. For this housing project, varied ceiling heights create air volumes within the interior spaces, and the façade is redefined to encase the building in a spatial membrane. Both design strategies help regulate thermal comfort by eliminating heat through reduced air temperatures , maximized airflow and dehumidified spaces, all without sacrificing aesthetics. Locally sourced materials are meticulously selected to enhance the design and create comfortable spaces. The free-standing concrete structure and elegant teakwood brise soleil allow the project to float above the ground wrapped in an intricate, patterned skin. Lightweight material choices for walls, including in-situ built structural insulated panels (SIPs) and prefabricated magnesium-oxide fiberboard, prevent heat gain by minimizing thermal mass. Besides catering to the thermal characteristics of the equatorial site, the design team incorporated water management systems to optimize abundant resources. Catchment systems harvest stormwater during the rainy season, while greywater is treated using a biogas digester plant to make it potable. By integrating various site-specific strategies with sophisticated architectural details, the architects create a distinct East African tropical modernist aesthetic that bridges local craftsmanship with international contemporary design. + APC Architectural Pioneering Consultants Images courtesy of Markus Lanz/PK Odessa and APC

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Super-local Passivhaus Caretakers House is built from locally grown and felled timber

July 6, 2016 by  
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The 120-square-meter Caretaker’s House is constructed from a variety of unseasoned timber , including larch, cedar, and spruce, but uses the wood for more than just its framework. The wood is also used for heating and insulation, particularly on the relatively closed north side, which features thick and heavy timber walls. In contrast, the south side opens up to the outdoors with a large verandah that extends the living space into the wooded landscape. Large windows bring natural light indoors and frame views into the forest. Passive solar orientation minimizes the home’s energy needs to meet Passivhaus standards. Related: Invisible Studio’s New Timber Office Was Built With Locally Sourced Materials for Just Over $25K “The construction process is super-efficient,” write the architects. “There are no wet trades whatsoever – the mini piles are steel and the only non timber structural item.” The interior light timber walls are left untreated and contrast beautifully with the black steel window frames, doorways, and wood-burning stove . In addition to the locally felled timber, the house was also constructed using joinery manufactured on-site and steel bent piping welded on-site. + Invisible Studio Via ArchDaily Images via Invisible Studio

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Super-local Passivhaus Caretakers House is built from locally grown and felled timber

Algaevator transforms algae production into a beautiful work of art and architecture

June 28, 2016 by  
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Created as part of the Burglars of Transnatural Transparency (BoTT) Lab pavilion, the Algaevator is a gravity-based algae photobioreactor built to explore the architectural possibilities of biotechnology utilities. The resulting lightweight and transparent structure comprises three separated spirals intercoiled between a heat-fused, watertight, and layered membrane. “An algae photobioreactor is an artificial environment used to increase the production of algae through the introduction of slow movement, carbon dioxide , and increased access to sunlight,” write the designers. “The algae is then used for various consumer products and alternative fuels.” Related: Biodegradable algae water bottles provide a green alternative to plastic The Algaevator’s first spiral introduces carbon dioxide from the environment to the bottom of the coil via a low-energy pump where it travels into an algae-filled spiral. Bubbles gently push the algae, which is combined with carbon dioxide for photosynthesis , to the top of the spiral where the algae is able to off-gas oxygen into the environment and then descend back down to the bottom of the spiral for further cycling. The structure is also able to harvest rainwater for adjacent biotech functions. The Algaevator was put on display and successfully operated for its three-month deployment. + Tyler Stevermer + Jie Zhang Images via Tyler Stevermer

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Algaevator transforms algae production into a beautiful work of art and architecture

Sea turtle is rescued after being dragged onto a beach and beaten for selfies

June 24, 2016 by  
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Add this case to the list of selfish and oblivious tourists terrorizing an animal for their own entertainment. This week, a poor sea turtle was dragged onto a beach in Lebanon by people seeking a photo op, joining the ranks of the baby dolphin killed earlier this year and the shark just last week. Luckily, the turtle did not die, though it was injured, and has been taken in by a local animal protection organization to recovery from injuries. The scene took place on Havana Beach in Beirut, where a loggerhead sea turtle was dragged out of the sea and, at some point, beaten with a stick. Beachgoers took photographs and one family even made their child stand on the turtle’s back. Animals Lebanon was contacted and able to come rescue the sea creature before more harm could be done. Jason Mier, the organization’s executive director, stated, “Luckily, other people were there who did care and stopped this and helped get the turtle to a safe area.” Related: A baby dolphin died in Argentina after being manhandled by tourists The rescuers noticed a dent in the turtle’s head, where sea water had started to seep into the bone. Two veterinarians concluded that the injury was sustained recently, most likely from its abusive encounter on the beach. The turtle is currently being rehabilitated by Animals Lebanon, where it is receiving antibiotics to prevent infection. In a few weeks the turtle should be ready to return to the sea. Via  The Dodo Images via  Pixabay , screenshot

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Sea turtle is rescued after being dragged onto a beach and beaten for selfies

Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

October 10, 2015 by  
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A mobile organic food market is making its way around Toronto, bringing fresh fruit and veggies to areas considered to be food deserts. Designed by LGA Architectural Planners , the mobile farmer’s market was converted from an old shuttle bus donated by the Toronto Transit Commission. Stocked with fresh seasonal produce, the unit lets Torontonians munch on fresh healthy foods, even if they live far from grocery stores. Read the rest of Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

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Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

November 24, 2014 by  
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A new mobile organic food market is making its way around Toronto, bringing fresh fruit and veggies to areas considered to be food deserts. Designed by LGA Architectural Planners , the mobile farmer’s market was converted from an old shuttle bus donated by the Toronto Transit Commission. Stocked with fresh seasonal produce, the unit lets Torontonians munch on fresh healthy foods, even if they live far from grocery stores. Read the rest of Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: canada , eco design , food bus , food desert , Food Share buses , food trucks , fresh produce bus , green design , LGA Architectural Planners , repurposed transit bus , sustainable design , Toronto Transit Commission , Toronto veggie bus

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Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat

November 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adobe walls , Aknaibich , BC Architects , bioclimatic , Bioclimatic Architecture , Dorian Vauzelle , locally sourced materials , locally sourced stone , morocco , mud bricks , Nicolas Coeckelberghs , rammed earth , the Goodplanet foundation , united carbon action program

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Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat

Marking the Forest : An Architecture Course in the Oregon Woods

August 29, 2014 by  
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People who love architecture tend to love wild spaces as well: after all, buildings and landscapes complement one another, right? Well, imagine being able to study architecture design in a forest environment, where structures are created in symbiosis with the living environment. Sounds amazing, doesn’t it? If this sounds like something you’d love to study, you’re in luck: there’s an architecture studio in the heart of the Eugene, Oregon forest called Marking the Forest that might pique your curiosity. The course is given through the Architectural Association in collaboration with the University of Oregon , and delves into subjects such as thoughtfully marking and occupying wild terrain, and re-appropriation of wood into a forest. If this course interests you (or you know someone who’d love to take it), check out the links below for more information. + Marking the Forest + University of Oregon Architecture and Allied Arts The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architectural Association , Architecture , eugene , Eugene Oregon , forest , forests , Marking the Forest , Oregon , university of oregon , woods

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Students Build Dynamic FIBERwave Pavilion Out of Carbon Fiber Layers

July 15, 2014 by  
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Students in the College of Architecture at IIT recently completed FIBERwave, a full-scale carbon fiber pavilion that was built following a successful Kickstarter campaign. Designed as part of the student design research studio Carbon_Lab , the armadillo-like lightweight pavilion is built entirely of carbon fiber to provoke discussion on the architectural potential of the flexible but strong material. The pavilion was created from a series of identical geometric “shells” held together with metal rings and tension cables. The tension cables can be loosened or tightened to change the shape of the pavilion in response to the environment. + Carbon_Lab The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon fiber , carbon fiber in architecture , carbon fiber pavilion , carbon_lab , carbon_lab pavilion , college of architecture at iit , fiberwave , fiberwave pavilion , reader submitted content

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Students Build Dynamic FIBERwave Pavilion Out of Carbon Fiber Layers

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