Modern desert home is a sculptural extension of the landscape

March 23, 2018 by  
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Specht Architects completed the Sundial House, a modernist home that derives its name from the changing play of light and shadow indoors. Set atop a ridge in Santa Fe , New Mexico, the award-winning residence is built to look and feel like a sculptural extension of the landscape with impressive panoramic views of the surrounding mountains. Oriented for optimal views of the Sangre de Christos mountains, the Sundial House makes the most of its views with large expanses of glass protected by the cantilevered roof. The home is organized around two perpendicular board-formed concrete walls. The landscape design reinforces the sense of order and rhythm laid out by the architectural elements. Related: Passive VOLKsHouse is an Affordable Net-Zero Energy Home in Santa Fe “The house enhances a feeling of connection to the site, both physically, and temporally, and provides a true sense of shelter,” wrote the architects. The indoor-outdoor relationship is strengthened not only through glazed walls and a skylight, but with the addition of courtyards as well. + Specht Architects Via Dezeen Images by Taggart Sorensen

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Modern desert home is a sculptural extension of the landscape

Schmidt Hammer Lassen designs BREEAM-seeking brewery renovation in Riga

March 23, 2018 by  
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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects has beaten the likes of Henning Larsen and Zaha Hadid Architects in a competition to design Kimmel Quarter, a major urban revitalization project in Riga, Latvia . Located in the capital’s Central District, the project will be centered on the redevelopment of Brewery Kimmel, a 19th century beer brewery rich in history. The adaptive reuse scheme will preserve the site’s historical roots while adding new mixed-use programming that follow sustainable design principles. The 11,500-square-meter Kimmel Quarter will become Riga’s new destination for working, shopping, and recreation. The abandoned industrial buildings that occupy nearly an entire city block will be restored and transformed into a 30,000-square-meter office building, a hotel, a public gym, a child care center, a cafe, a spa, a food court, and a convenience store. Inviting courtyards and plazas will tie the various spaces together. “We wanted to create a new composition of building volumes as pragmatic and straight forward as the old industrial complex with a dynamic façade that pushes back and forth and up and down,” said Rasmus Kierkegaard, Associate Partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen. “The resulting architecture is distinctly modern, but in a rewarding dialogue with the old restored buildings. We have designed a new Kimmel Quarter in which history and the future are bound by timeless architecture.” Related: Lookout Loop bird observatory in Latvia doubles as a temporary shelter Sensitive adaptive reuse, passive solar orientation, and use of recycled materials and rainwater are part of the design’s focus on sustainability. Kimmel Quarter will follow BREEAM standards and is expected to serve as one of Riga’s model project for meeting the European Union’s 2020 climate and energy package goals. + Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Images via Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

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Schmidt Hammer Lassen designs BREEAM-seeking brewery renovation in Riga

Winners of tiny house competition pack comfort and functionality into 269 square feet

February 19, 2018 by  
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Modular building company Ryterna modul recently announced the winners of their Architectural Challenge 2018 competition. Participants were tasked with designing a cozy, functional, modular 269-square-foot tiny house with a living area, sleeping area, kitchen, and bathroom. They received 150 projects from designers in 88 countries and narrowed the field down to three winners and an honorable mention. Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi of Iran took first place with his Wave House . Wave House curves up on both sides, with the goal of maximizing use of natural resources. The curves of water in nature inspired the design , and naturally, water and its use features prominently in this tiny house. Water from the sinks and shower are sent to a refinery tank to be purified and re-pumped. High windows in the tiny house invite occupants to fully enjoy surrounding natural landscape, and a folding desk inside is just one feature that creates more space. Related: How one couple adapted a 204-square-foot tiny house for their new baby Julia and Stas Kaptur of Russia nabbed second place for their tiny house 24052705 . They said they entered the competition because “it is a big dream to create spaces in picturesque, hard-to-reach places, such as a river bank, or deep-deep forest.” Transparent external walls with sliding doors invite dwellers of this tiny home to enjoy nature from any room. 24052705 features modular rooms with a living room in the middle. In the standard design, a bedroom and kitchen/bathroom are on either side. The design can be enlarged to include more rooms. William Samin of Indonesia took home third place for his tiny house TM 0301 . He comprised his design of modules that can be stacked or mounted horizontally. The tiny house can be adapted to different types of terrain with a vertical configuration or on stilts . Pivot walls or what Samin called glazing doors can be opened to allow fresh air to flood the home. Floor level storage for rollable mattresses or folded furniture maximize space in the design. The tiny house can go off-grid with a rainwater collection system and solar panels. Ryterna modul gave an honorable mention to Clarence Zichen Qian of China for ATN . They said in their video that his highly theoretical concept prompted them to reflect and think deeper about human existence. ATN can be a tilted or leaning tiny house that’s pictured perched atop other buildings, “detached from the crowd,” according to the PDF on the design. The purpose of the tiny house is to give an occupant time away from social media , in which they can observe and ponder the meaning of life. + Ryterna modul + Ryterna modul Architectural Challenge 2018 Images courtesy of Ryterna modul

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Winners of tiny house competition pack comfort and functionality into 269 square feet

Super-local Passivhaus Caretakers House is built from locally grown and felled timber

July 6, 2016 by  
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The 120-square-meter Caretaker’s House is constructed from a variety of unseasoned timber , including larch, cedar, and spruce, but uses the wood for more than just its framework. The wood is also used for heating and insulation, particularly on the relatively closed north side, which features thick and heavy timber walls. In contrast, the south side opens up to the outdoors with a large verandah that extends the living space into the wooded landscape. Large windows bring natural light indoors and frame views into the forest. Passive solar orientation minimizes the home’s energy needs to meet Passivhaus standards. Related: Invisible Studio’s New Timber Office Was Built With Locally Sourced Materials for Just Over $25K “The construction process is super-efficient,” write the architects. “There are no wet trades whatsoever – the mini piles are steel and the only non timber structural item.” The interior light timber walls are left untreated and contrast beautifully with the black steel window frames, doorways, and wood-burning stove . In addition to the locally felled timber, the house was also constructed using joinery manufactured on-site and steel bent piping welded on-site. + Invisible Studio Via ArchDaily Images via Invisible Studio

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Super-local Passivhaus Caretakers House is built from locally grown and felled timber

Algaevator transforms algae production into a beautiful work of art and architecture

June 28, 2016 by  
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Created as part of the Burglars of Transnatural Transparency (BoTT) Lab pavilion, the Algaevator is a gravity-based algae photobioreactor built to explore the architectural possibilities of biotechnology utilities. The resulting lightweight and transparent structure comprises three separated spirals intercoiled between a heat-fused, watertight, and layered membrane. “An algae photobioreactor is an artificial environment used to increase the production of algae through the introduction of slow movement, carbon dioxide , and increased access to sunlight,” write the designers. “The algae is then used for various consumer products and alternative fuels.” Related: Biodegradable algae water bottles provide a green alternative to plastic The Algaevator’s first spiral introduces carbon dioxide from the environment to the bottom of the coil via a low-energy pump where it travels into an algae-filled spiral. Bubbles gently push the algae, which is combined with carbon dioxide for photosynthesis , to the top of the spiral where the algae is able to off-gas oxygen into the environment and then descend back down to the bottom of the spiral for further cycling. The structure is also able to harvest rainwater for adjacent biotech functions. The Algaevator was put on display and successfully operated for its three-month deployment. + Tyler Stevermer + Jie Zhang Images via Tyler Stevermer

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Algaevator transforms algae production into a beautiful work of art and architecture

Sea turtle is rescued after being dragged onto a beach and beaten for selfies

June 24, 2016 by  
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Add this case to the list of selfish and oblivious tourists terrorizing an animal for their own entertainment. This week, a poor sea turtle was dragged onto a beach in Lebanon by people seeking a photo op, joining the ranks of the baby dolphin killed earlier this year and the shark just last week. Luckily, the turtle did not die, though it was injured, and has been taken in by a local animal protection organization to recovery from injuries. The scene took place on Havana Beach in Beirut, where a loggerhead sea turtle was dragged out of the sea and, at some point, beaten with a stick. Beachgoers took photographs and one family even made their child stand on the turtle’s back. Animals Lebanon was contacted and able to come rescue the sea creature before more harm could be done. Jason Mier, the organization’s executive director, stated, “Luckily, other people were there who did care and stopped this and helped get the turtle to a safe area.” Related: A baby dolphin died in Argentina after being manhandled by tourists The rescuers noticed a dent in the turtle’s head, where sea water had started to seep into the bone. Two veterinarians concluded that the injury was sustained recently, most likely from its abusive encounter on the beach. The turtle is currently being rehabilitated by Animals Lebanon, where it is receiving antibiotics to prevent infection. In a few weeks the turtle should be ready to return to the sea. Via  The Dodo Images via  Pixabay , screenshot

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Sea turtle is rescued after being dragged onto a beach and beaten for selfies

Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

October 10, 2015 by  
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A mobile organic food market is making its way around Toronto, bringing fresh fruit and veggies to areas considered to be food deserts. Designed by LGA Architectural Planners , the mobile farmer’s market was converted from an old shuttle bus donated by the Toronto Transit Commission. Stocked with fresh seasonal produce, the unit lets Torontonians munch on fresh healthy foods, even if they live far from grocery stores. Read the rest of Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

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Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

November 24, 2014 by  
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A new mobile organic food market is making its way around Toronto, bringing fresh fruit and veggies to areas considered to be food deserts. Designed by LGA Architectural Planners , the mobile farmer’s market was converted from an old shuttle bus donated by the Toronto Transit Commission. Stocked with fresh seasonal produce, the unit lets Torontonians munch on fresh healthy foods, even if they live far from grocery stores. Read the rest of Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: canada , eco design , food bus , food desert , Food Share buses , food trucks , fresh produce bus , green design , LGA Architectural Planners , repurposed transit bus , sustainable design , Toronto Transit Commission , Toronto veggie bus

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Toronto’s Converted Veggie Bus Brings Produce to Food Desert Areas

Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat

November 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adobe walls , Aknaibich , BC Architects , bioclimatic , Bioclimatic Architecture , Dorian Vauzelle , locally sourced materials , locally sourced stone , morocco , mud bricks , Nicolas Coeckelberghs , rammed earth , the Goodplanet foundation , united carbon action program

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Bioclimatic Preschool is Built with Rammed Earth Walls and Mud Bricks to Keep Cool in the Moroccan Heat

Marking the Forest : An Architecture Course in the Oregon Woods

August 29, 2014 by  
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People who love architecture tend to love wild spaces as well: after all, buildings and landscapes complement one another, right? Well, imagine being able to study architecture design in a forest environment, where structures are created in symbiosis with the living environment. Sounds amazing, doesn’t it? If this sounds like something you’d love to study, you’re in luck: there’s an architecture studio in the heart of the Eugene, Oregon forest called Marking the Forest that might pique your curiosity. The course is given through the Architectural Association in collaboration with the University of Oregon , and delves into subjects such as thoughtfully marking and occupying wild terrain, and re-appropriation of wood into a forest. If this course interests you (or you know someone who’d love to take it), check out the links below for more information. + Marking the Forest + University of Oregon Architecture and Allied Arts The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architectural Association , Architecture , eugene , Eugene Oregon , forest , forests , Marking the Forest , Oregon , university of oregon , woods

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