Home in Vietnam is surrounded by a beautiful koi pond

May 6, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Home in Vietnam is surrounded by a beautiful koi pond

A marketing director in Vietnam wanted a peaceful retreat from the stress of work and Ho Chi Minh City. The client reached out to three architects who now work with three different studios — Nguyen Huu Duy of AmDesign Architects, Bui The Long of CTA|Creative Architects and Nguyen Duy of Time Architects — to collaborate on how to create the perfect retreat. Am House is a modern twist on traditional Vietnamese architectural styles and building techniques. It is all set in the middle of a koi pond on an acre of peaceful property surrounded by trees. The Am House project was built in Can Giuoc, Long An province, Vietnam, about a 45-minute drive from Ho Chi Minh City . The architects used a variety of techniques to create a peaceful setting, while also making the home modern and sustainable. Am House combines several solutions for ventilation to keep the humidity down. There is a peaceful gray color palette and natural light in every room. Additionally, there’s broad accordion doors that open directly onto the pond. The breezes from the pond all combine to create an airy, but solid home for reflection and relaxation. Related: Energy efficient bamboo device in Vietnam is a cooling system Additionally, the roof is thatched, sitting on top of a wooden roof structure covered in metal sheeting. This is a nod to traditional Vietnamese roofing styles, but it also serves as extra insulation against the heat from the sun . The middle of the house also has extra ventilation via gaps around a large pane window . It creates a unique style to the home with regards to how the walls and windows interact. Also, how light plays into the interior while also serving an important function for natural cooling. The pond sits right up against the walls of the house, with paver stepping stones leading to and outdoor deck suspended among the koi fish. Because the pond is so close to the home, it creates an eco-friendly passive cooling system for the home to reduce the need for air conditioning. Inside, the wood-paneled ceiling is painted the same color as the concrete walls and floors. Concrete without tiles keep costs and materials use down, while also creating a cool surface for inhabitants to walk across. The Am House home is composed of five separate block shapes arranged randomly under the thatched roof . This splitting of the interior space creates new viewpoints from inside and outside the home of the beautiful property. The overall effect is one of a peaceful retreat center, a hushed and relaxed space to spend the evening or weekend. We love the passive elements that surrounds the home with its natural surroundings and climate . And imagine, the Am House is nothing short of a sigh of relief at the end of a busy week in the city. + Time Architects , CTA|Creative Architects and AmDesign Architects Photography by Hiroyuki Oki

See original here:
Home in Vietnam is surrounded by a beautiful koi pond

This sustainable kitchen remodel maximizes efficiency

April 15, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This sustainable kitchen remodel maximizes efficiency

A Mar Vista kitchen remodel by Sato Architects is showing how even tiny post-war tract houses can be made sustainable. The original 1,000-square-foot house home had never been renovated or updated. With a limited budget, Sato Architects transformed the kitchen by adding just 75 square feet and reconfiguring the nearby dining room and living room into an open concept floor plan. The completed renovation features all new finishes and appliances. The idea was simple but ambitious — create a new floorplan for the main living area and build a sustainable new kitchen all while employing best practices to reduce the remodel’s environmental impact. To achieve this, materials   were donated and reused as much as possible, and new finishes were selected for their sustainable attributes. Related: Pixie Retreat: Behind the scenes in a raw commercial kitchen Rapidly renewable materials such as bamboo , cork, and Kirei board were used throughout the project. Salvaged Kirei board makes up several accents and the locally-made cabinets. Meanwhile, the flooring features cork and bamboo. Each material’s durability and recycled content factored into decision-making. To conserve energy, windows and doors were replaced with dual-paned low-E glazing . With a small budget, the architects focused on areas with maximum environmental impact. Appliances and heating systems were also selected for efficiency, and LED lighting was installed. Richlite cladding made of recycled paper and resin on the exterior and high R-value insulation contribute to the project’s energy efficiency. The adjoining deck connects to overhangs to reduce solar gain, and the garden outside is all drought-resistant or edible. Each thoughtful feature pulls its weight as part of this remodel. Thinking about a sustainable renovation project of your own? Use the Mar Vista project as inspiration for creating a more eco-conscious space with efficient appliances, sustainable building materials and minimal environmental impact. Explore more about this project via Sato Architects. Additional images are also featured on Dwell. + Sato Architects Via Dwell Photography by Brandon Shigeta

More: 
This sustainable kitchen remodel maximizes efficiency

Art installation raises concerns on the rising sea level

April 15, 2022 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Art installation raises concerns on the rising sea level

St. Petersburg, Florida is already struggling with the effects of significant rising sea level. TIDAL, created by The Urban Conga, is an art installation that uses play to spark conversations about this important topic related to climate change. TIDAL art installation was installed in the Florida community of Shore Acres in St. Petersburg. They chose that location because they are already dealing with the effects of rising sea level and is at high risk of experiencing more challenges as time goes on. Related: 8 boxes that explore the effects of habitat destruction on birds If we remain on our current trajectory, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts that the area’s sea rise could reach over nine feet by 2100. This is nearly five times what the average sea level rise should be worldwide within that time frame. It is enough to cause disastrous and irreversible damage. “The way this information is presented often makes climate change a challenging topic for people to want to hear about or discuss, as it is usually spoken of in ways that make people feel uncomfortable or overwhelmed,” the designers explained. As a result, TIDAL was designed to be interactive, using key data points from NOAA to spark a dialogue around climate change in the area. The design uses play methodologies as tools for breaking down barriers and fostering discussion. Furthermore, the TIDAL installation sits at the entryway to the new Shore Acres Community Recreation Center. The work was designed as an ever-changing community landmark that responds to the people, the surrounding landscape and the interactions between them. Additionally, the design of the form was generated using data from NOAA. It indicates the projected sea-level rise of nine feet relative to the resilient goal of a two-foot rise in the next 78 years. TIDAL’s design also takes the average tidal patterns of the area to create a series of flowing pillars that reflect and refract the surrounding context. The pillars act like breaking waves along the main pathway to the building. As people walk by each pillar, they illuminate, revealing perforated data points generated from the local tidal patterns. The pillars then fade away, just like ocean watermarks left behind on piers as the tides change. As people continue to pass by, they begin to see themselves reflected on the work itself. Similarly, the angle at which they view the work begins to change its color . “These experiences evoke an internal reflection through the playful interactions of the work,” the designers said. The goal is to present the information in a way that people can visually understand how they interact with climate change can make a huge difference. Therefore, TIDAL is made of recyclable polycarbonate and aluminum made locally. These help mitigate the carbon footprint of the artwork. The work also contains low-powered lighting and sits within a permeable planter bed to help with rainwater collection. + The Urban Conga Photography by Maria Flanagan

See the original post:
Art installation raises concerns on the rising sea level

Metal walls panels from Dri-Design are 100% recyclable

April 15, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Metal walls panels from Dri-Design are 100% recyclable

Dri-Design started out as a small business. The founders of Dri-Design used their experience and their hands-on knowledge to see exactly what was wrong with certain building materials and how to make them a lot better. They saw how the metal panel systems that were used for decades could become sustainable aspects of a building. Nearly 20 years ago, Dri-Design began in a small metal shop. Metal was folded to make it stronger and to mitigate some of those flaws in the design. Dri-Design metal wall panels are 100% recyclable . They are not laminated, don’t need sealants and don’t require gaskets, attaching without use of clips or extrusions. Related: Sustainability is a top priority at this Texas office As a result, the innovative techniques created by Dri-Design were used for the new Aloft and Element Hotels in Austin, Texas . It is an incredible project that will produce dazzling results. When complete, the project will include the 278-room Aloft and the 144-suite Element. These projects are in Downtown Austin , within walking distance of amazing venues and places to shop, not to mention the campus of the University of Texas. Similar with their other projects, Dri-Design uses local aluminum mills to save on transportation costs. Because no gaskets or joint sealants are used, no petroleum was used. This reduces fossil fuels and maintenance costs. All the metal used to make these panels is recycled and recyclable. These panels are made quickly with automated equipment, which saves on energy costs. Meanwhile, there is no plastic in these panels. Dri-Design painted aluminum panels can be made in any color. And in the planned design for Aloft and Element, these panels are absolutely stunning. These buildings are LEED-certified and absolutely amazing, each with its own amenities. Reducing labor costs, focusing on recyclable materials, using fewer fossil fuels and creating innovative, gorgeous design is what sustainable construction is all about. Dri-Design is a leader in the sustainable construction industry. + Dri-Design Images via Dri-Design

Original post:
Metal walls panels from Dri-Design are 100% recyclable

Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather

December 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather

QBO3 Architects have created Casa Ethos, a home in Puerto Rico that explores brutalist architecture, or how a home can be left uninhabited safely for long periods while still adapting to the environment. “The house is located in a wooded area in Carrillo de Guanacaste, and from the beginning it was considered to conserve the largest number of existing trees on the property,” said the architects. “This was a starting point to the integration of the house with its immediate context and concepts such as permeability, integration and the exterior-interior relationship became fundamental in the design process.” Related: Hemp and lime studio in Italy highlights sustainable living This 425-square-meter home is left uninhabited for long periods every year, so it needed to be resistant to weather and winds. “From these limitations, the idea of brutalist architecture was born,” said QBO3 Architects. “A reinforced concrete shelter with permeable membranes that adapt to the temporalities, the architectural program and the climate.” A new guest room was designed to add space, connecting the terrace on the second level. The room focuses on the preserved tree that sits at the center of the house. “[A] large opening of the new volume is proposed to focus both: the tree and the predominant view of the site, and which will be protected at the same time by elements that reduce the solar impact on the house, such as blinds and large eaves that also provide thermal comfort to the interior of the room,” QBO3 Architects said. The new guest suite is intended to create a contrast with the rest of the home but maintain the “ raw style ” of the existing materials and feel of the cement and wood structure. “Ethos House is a project that seeks to enhance the beauty of the context in which it is located, but also of the materials that compose it, in such a way that the construction techniques were worked on in a meticulous way so each material and finish was exposed in its own pure way,” said QBO3 Architects. + QBO3 Architects Images via QBO3

The rest is here: 
Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather

Lamps by Biohm are made from coffee and orange peel

December 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Lamps by Biohm are made from coffee and orange peel

Biohm, a London biotech and biomanufacturing startup, has created a line of sustainable lampshades called Obscure that are made of 100% coffee chaff and orange peel. Biohm has become an example of what’s possible in development and bio-manufacturing of natural materials for the built environment. They regularly use excess resources/wastes and byproducts, aiming to reduce use of plastics by replacing them in various products they create. Biohm is working to address several planetary challenges at once: the climate crisis, waste crisis and social injustice. Their approach is to apply principles of biomimetics, or systematically applying the ecological laws of nature , to create products and manufacturing approaches that innovate across the entire manufacturing life cycle. And, therefore, to create ethically-sourced and locally-fabricated high-performance sustainable products. Related: Artist 3D-prints biodegradable agar floral lamps “There has never been a more critical time to be doing the work we do at Biohm,” said Ehab Sayed, founder and director of innovation at Biohm. “Recent events have emphasized how our economies and systems are flawed and unsustainable, and that we need to immediately implement radical and regenerative biotechnologies delivered through equitable and compassionate business models to make leaps in the fight against the climate crisis.” For these lampshades, Biohm has used a material they call Orb, or organic refuse biocompound, to combine food and agricultural bioproducts with a plant-based binder. Orb can be molded or formed into sheets to create products such as lampshades. Obscure Lampshades are handmade on demand at Biohm headquarters in London. The production process has been designed to be closed loop with no waste streams or byproducts and will operate on demand to avoid additional waste from overproduction. The coolest thing about the Obscure Lampshades is that they could be cold composted or recycled right back into the same production process of Orb to make new products. + Biohm Images via Biohm

Go here to read the rest:
Lamps by Biohm are made from coffee and orange peel

Eco-friendly housing redefines Tanzanian urban architecture

October 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eco-friendly housing redefines Tanzanian urban architecture

The Teachers Housing for the International School of Tanganyika is a contemporary residential project by Architectural Pioneering Consultants (APC) that incorporates site-specific solutions to adapt to the vibrant tropical surroundings. Located in the rapidly growing coastal city of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania , the 12-unit apartment block serves as a model for sustainable urban architecture in the region. Often, sustainability efforts in Africa focus on rural regions, despite the rapid expansion of urban areas. This results in unsustainable infrastructure that permeates growing cities. Taking this into consideration, the architects explored ecological solutions to satisfy the needs of the residents. Related: These bioclimatic student dorms use low-cost, sustainable materials The apartment block is seamlessly embedded in the site and oriented to interact with on-site foliage and maximize views of the Indian Ocean . Lush vegetation, including the flourishing fig and tamarind trees, were fully preserved during construction and shade the spaces surrounding the project. Successful eco-friendly designs for the tropics require innovative approaches to mitigate climatic factors. For this housing project, varied ceiling heights create air volumes within the interior spaces, and the façade is redefined to encase the building in a spatial membrane. Both design strategies help regulate thermal comfort by eliminating heat through reduced air temperatures , maximized airflow and dehumidified spaces, all without sacrificing aesthetics. Locally sourced materials are meticulously selected to enhance the design and create comfortable spaces. The free-standing concrete structure and elegant teakwood brise soleil allow the project to float above the ground wrapped in an intricate, patterned skin. Lightweight material choices for walls, including in-situ built structural insulated panels (SIPs) and prefabricated magnesium-oxide fiberboard, prevent heat gain by minimizing thermal mass. Besides catering to the thermal characteristics of the equatorial site, the design team incorporated water management systems to optimize abundant resources. Catchment systems harvest stormwater during the rainy season, while greywater is treated using a biogas digester plant to make it potable. By integrating various site-specific strategies with sophisticated architectural details, the architects create a distinct East African tropical modernist aesthetic that bridges local craftsmanship with international contemporary design. + APC Architectural Pioneering Consultants Images courtesy of Markus Lanz/PK Odessa and APC

More: 
Eco-friendly housing redefines Tanzanian urban architecture

Ngi Space offers a new purpose to traditional ceiling tiles

August 9, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ngi Space offers a new purpose to traditional ceiling tiles

Architecture can connect with nature, serve a purpose and bring visual charm all at the same time. This seems to be the case with Ngói Space, a multipurpose building located in a residential area outside Hanoi, Vietnam . Ngói Space sits on a corner, drawing attention from every angle. H&P Architects compare the design to that of a tree , such as a branching banyan or bodhi tree, merged with elements of a cave. H&P Architects designed Ngói Space not only as a community hub but as an example of tilework architecture. Many of the existing and crumbling tile-ceiling buildings in the country are torn down with little consideration for material recycling . Yet, the tile is a familiar natural material, so the architects chose to use it in unfamiliar ways, creating curtains and walls rather than just traditional tile ceilings. Related: Reclaimed timber makes up this tranquil nature retreat in Vietnam   With this project, the architects said, “The Ngói space was created as an inspiring solution to reusing these memory-filled tiles.” A press release further explained, “On a larger scale, it orientates users towards a sustainable tomorrow, from the perspective of reaching back to the past to recognize and rediscover the core and hidden values of the original space and use those values to create spaces of the future.” The eye-catching design incorporates 20,000 ‘viglacera dong anh tiles’ into the exterior, forming five levels of clay tile triangles as an exterior skin to the building. The roofing tiles form a shaded space between that exterior and a glass wall on the interior layer. Floor nets and casual areas to enjoy a cold beverage with friends fill the void. The building also includes a two-floor café , a multifunctional space for seminars or exhibitions on the fourth floor and a rooftop garden. + H&P Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by Le Minh Hoang via H&P Architects

Read more from the original source: 
Ngi Space offers a new purpose to traditional ceiling tiles

Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

October 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

Melbourne-based Zen Architects  converted a rundown 1960s warehouse into a gorgeous, energy-efficient home . The green-centric architects focused the ethos of the project on retaining and reusing as much of the warehouse’s original materials as possible while simultaneously creating an ultra-efficient, light-filled family home. The architects focused the project on using whatever they could from the almost 60-year-old space to create a contemporary home. The original frame and open layout of the 2,583-square-foot warehouse was kept as it was in order to start with an open slate. To begin the project, the design team carefully stripped various original features from the warehouse such as light fixtures, sprinkler pipes, doors, cladding, and roof sheeting – all to be repurposed into the new home, which has a 6.1 star energy rating. Related: Perkins + Will overhauls a boring concrete warehouse into beautiful LEED Gold offices The existing concrete floor of the warehouse was kept in tact for two reasons: to retain the industrial character of the building and for the energy-efficient benefits that come along with a concrete base. The living space was carefully crafted into the open layout to create a comfy living area down below with the bedrooms on a newly created “floating” mezzanine level installed in the roof’s volume between the existing trusses. Plywood pods were used to create spaces for the bedrooms and en suite bathrooms, which are reached by a wooden staircase. A continual sense of light and space was achieved by strategically placing windows and glazed panels that provide a seamless connection between the interior living space the outdoor areas. To add open-air space within the living area, the architects created a north-facing interior courtyard, which in addition to flooding the interior with natural light , provides natural heat to the interior during the wintertime. To waterproof the space, the architects laid a new ground level slab that drains rain water to a storm water pit. The slab is hidden under a timber deck made of recycled wood that runs through the interior and exterior spaces. + Zen Architects Via Dwell

Read the original post: 
Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact

October 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact

This solitary cabin in Lincoln, New Hampshire, was built to fit the rock on which it sits, rather than the other way around. I-Kanda Architects designed the building as an angular timber structure precariously perched on a granite outcropping in the White Mountain. Using just nine foundation points and prefabricated framing, the architects specifically designed the 900-square-foot cabin to have a gentle environmental impact. Providing stunning views of the valley and several prominent peaks of the mountain range, the home was designed to minimize the amount of trees that needed to be cleared. Initially conceived as a weekend getaway for two people, the structure evolved to meet the spatial and functional demands of a family of four. Related: Dreamy cabin is a luxurious escape in the New Zealand bush The growing needs of the family combined with the site’s unique spatial restraints required the architects to maximize the footprint of the building without imposing on the landscape—and the result + I-Kanda Architects Via Architizer Photos by Matt Delphenich

Go here to read the rest:
Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 11855 access attempts in the last 7 days.