South Korean production facility makes medicine out of dandelions

September 30, 2016 by  
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The Korean Dandelion Farm is located on the edge of a forest in Chungcheongbuk-do province in South Korea . It comprises a quiet retreat and a production facility for making remedies using dandelions, which have been used in traditional South Korean medicine for a long time. This wildflower, which can treat liver failure, kidney disease, fever and stomach ache, is grown in a designated area behind the building. Related: Korea’s platform_monsant cafe reflects its stunning volcanic surroundings The property is dominated by concrete and wood. Enclosed areas are made of concrete, while the open spaces are framed by wooden fences. Some parts of the building feature concrete elements cast against wooden boards. The contrast between dark and light areas is accentuated by the different treatment of closed and open spaces. A large pivoting wooden door leads to the cafe area through an open courtyard . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-PNDby5D6s Related: OBBA built this affordable 538-square-feet daylit house in Seoul for a newlywed couple and their cats “Experience of dark and light triggers your emotional experiences in this space,” said the architects. “When you enter the front courtyard, you can see the forest valley through the wide open farm cafe,” they added. + Archihood WXY Via Dezeen Photos and video by Woohyun Kang

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South Korean production facility makes medicine out of dandelions

Dystopian AR art installation shows how plants might adapt to rising global temperatures

September 30, 2016 by  
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Walk through the museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park and you will find yourself surrounded by both aquatic and terrestrial plant life straight out of a science fiction film. The scene is described by Thiel as featuring “plants [which] have mutated to cope with the increasing unpredictable and erratic climate swings.” As temperatures increase worldwide, Thiel’s research predicts that the native plants in the Seattle area will evolve to withstand climate change ’s effects and develop into greenery we have never seen before. Related: The Aeon Project brings augmented reality to your daily commute “Beyond this actual scientific basis, however, the artwork takes artistic license to imagine a surreal, dystopian scenario in which plants are ‘mutating’ to breach natural boundaries,” she explains. The “inherently erratic” behavior of the GPS lends to the entire dystopian feel of the project, as visitors must search to find different plant life on the grounds of the park. Observers may find tall, seaweed-like stalks on their journey or red algae pods expanding across the ground. Thiel used the platform Layar to create her installation and museum visitors can download the animations onto their smartphones. In the development of the project, she consulted with Center for Creative Conservation co-directors Josh Lawler and Julian Olden, who confirmed that the increasing temperature predictions previously estimated for the planet to arrive mid-century will be here within the next 10 years, instead. + Tamiko Thiel Via The Creators Project Images via Tamiko Thiel

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Dystopian AR art installation shows how plants might adapt to rising global temperatures

Solar-powered cylindrical treehouse in Mexico is made with sustainable bamboo

September 30, 2016 by  
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At 700 square feet, the treehouse is designed to “visually intrigue and highlight sustainable strategies to deliver a natural immersive guest experience,” according to Deture Culsign . The treehouse is built six feet off the ground amidst palm trees, which act as ” living piers .” There is a bedroom with a king bed, lounge area, built-in hammock , and private bathroom in the treehouse. California-based ArtisTree constructed the the treehouse. Related: 12 cocoon-shaped shelters connect visitors with nature in a Mexican biosphere reserve The design is meant to allow visitors to feel as they are moving seamlessly between the indoors and outdoors. Built with locally sourced wood, the treehouse blends into the natural environment. Solar power provides electricity and hot water. Hatch windows in the side of the circular treehouse allow for passive cooling. The bedroom ” perch ” occupies the upper level, and downstairs is a private bathroom tucked behind bamboo screens. The bathroom includes details like a carved stone sink and a shower floor made with pebbles laid by hand. Part of the bathroom roof is open to allow sky views. There’s also a daybed in the treehouse so more people can share the experience. Visitors pay between $445 and $620 a night, depending on whether it’s the low or high season. The room comes with daily yoga classes and three meals a day plus snacks. Playa Viva sits on almost 200 acres with a mile-long private beach. On their land is an estuary, turtle sanctuary, and an ” Aztec archaeological site .” Tropical forests and mangroves add beauty and variety to the location, which is near the village of Juluchuca. + Deture Culsign + Playa Viva Via AIA Chicago and Retail Design Blog Images via Playa Viva and Deture Culsign

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Solar-powered cylindrical treehouse in Mexico is made with sustainable bamboo

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