Secret tunnel sealed 1,800 years ago offers clues to mysterious ancient city in Mexico

July 4, 2016 by  
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The ancient city of Teotihuacán northeast of Mexico City in Mexico holds more mysteries than answers. Archaeologists can only guess where the people who built the city came from, what religion they practiced, and why they abandoned the city. But the recent archaeological discovery of a tunnel under one of the city’s pyramids , the Temple of the Plumed Serpent, which was sealed off around 1,800 years ago , may give us a few more clues about who inhabited and built the baffling city. Archaeologist Sergio Gómez, who works for the National Institute of Anthropology and History in Mexico, has worked in the area for around 30 years. He describes himself as someone more intimately acquainted with Teotihuacán than most other humans alive. But he had no idea there was anything under the Temple of the Plumed Serpent until a rainstorm struck the area in 2003. Related: Archaeologists find 2,150-year-old Petra monument ‘hiding in plain sight’ That’s when Gómez noticed a sinkhole that had opened near the base of the pyramid. Colleagues lowered him into the sinkhole and his feet touched bottom in what looked like a tunnel made by humans. Gómez finally gained approval from the government to start digging in 2009. The tunnel appears to have been sealed off with boulders on purpose close to 1,800 years ago. Gómez thought perhaps whoever sealed the tunnel meant for it to remain closed forever. His teams have worked carefully to uncover a wide array of artifacts, from human skin to boxes containing beetle wings to jaguar bones to elegantly carved statues. The tunnel is a thrilling discovery, and Gómez’s teams will keep working to probably uncover even more treasures. Gómez told Smithsonian Magazine, “The number of artifacts we’ve uncovered…you could spend a whole career evaluating the contents.” Perhaps as far back as 400 BC, people settled in Teotihuacán, but residents probably built the metropolis, including pyraminds and broad boulevards, around 100 A.D. Around 750 A.D. Teotihuacán was abandoned. The Aztecs didn’t find the city until sometime in the 1300s, and in their language, Nahuatl, Teotihuacán means “the place where men become gods,” adding another layer of mystery. Via Smithsonian Magazine Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Secret tunnel sealed 1,800 years ago offers clues to mysterious ancient city in Mexico

Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups

July 4, 2016 by  
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Built in the early 20th century, the Matadero Madrid served as a slaughterhouse and livestock market until it fell into disuse near the end of the century. The building was renovated several times under different leadership until Madrid’s City Council decided to allocate the space for sociocultural purposes. OSS’ intervention, completed in 2014, turned the complex into a creative startup hub for the extremely low budget of 105 Euros per square meter in a little under a month. Related: Renovated Paris Rail Station Will House 1000 Start-Ups! Factoría Cultural houses 120 workspaces across two floors—the architects constructed the second 85-square-meter floor using local pine lumber and multi-wall polycarbonate —outfitted with custom-designed furniture also made with untreated pinewood. LED ceiling lamps that splay out from overhead were made from waste wood. “Factoría Cultural is a reversible architecture work, which empowers, with no side effect, the visual and technical virtues of the existing El Matadero Madrid, an industrial architectural heritage site,” write the architects. “It is a space that requires minimal maintenance and, in the event Factoría’s activity ceases, it can be removed without waste.” + Office for Strategic Spaces Images by Simona Rota

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Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups

Lasers reveal ancient Cambodian cities hidden by jungle near Angkor Wat

June 13, 2016 by  
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In a thrilling new discovery, archaeologists used laser imaging technology to reveal ancient cities hidden by jungle in Cambodia. The LiDAR data provides information on waterways, iron smelting locations, and even another temple, Preah Khan. The discovery reveals that the cities near Angkor Wat were much larger than previously thought. Angkor Wat was built during the reign of King Suryavarman II of the Khmer Empire in the early to middle 1100s, and it was part of one of the biggest ancient cities . Archaeologists suspected there had to be more to the area, and research has been underway for several years. The new data appears to confirm these suspicions. Related: Archaeologists find 2,150-year-old Petra monument ‘hiding in plain sight’ Archaeologist Damian Evans said to AFP, “The LiDAR quite suddenly revealed an entire cityscape there with astonishing complexity. It turned out we’d been walking and flying right over the top of this stuff for ten years and not even noticing it because of the vegetation. What we had was basically a scatter of disconnected points on the map denoting temple sites. Now it’s like having a detailed street map of the entire city.” Back in 2012, scans revealed an ancient temple city close to Angkor Wat called Mahendraparvata, and the new scans will assist archaeologists on the ground as they continue to explore that area. It had been difficult for archaeologists to determine the extent of this area because the empire constructed many of the ancient buildings with wood that’s since rotted. Made of stone , the temples endure. Archaeologists saw evidence of both Hinduism and Buddhism in the temples; both religions were part of the Khmer Empire during different time periods. A spokesperson from the government authority in charge of Angkor Wat said they aimed to research further to build on the exciting discoveries. Via Phys.org Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Lasers reveal ancient Cambodian cities hidden by jungle near Angkor Wat

Digital Mapping of Stonehenge Reveals Site Is More Massive Than We Thought

September 10, 2014 by  
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Previously unknown archaeological monuments have been discovered around Stonehenge as part of an enormous digital mapping project that has transformed scientists’ knowledge of this iconic landscape . A team from the University of Birmingham’s Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project have used remote sensing techniques and geophysical surveys to map the area to a depth of three meters below ground, resulting in the most detailed archaeological digital map of Stonehenge and its surrounds ever produced. Startling new discoveries include 17 previously unknown ritual monuments dating to the period when Stonehenge was developed into its iconic ring shape. Read the rest of Digital Mapping of Stonehenge Reveals Site Is More Massive Than We Thought Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient monuments , archaeological dig , archaeological find , archaeologist , archaeology , burial mound , digital mapping , geophysical survey , prehistoric , Professor Vince Gaffney , remote sensing , Stonehenge , united kingdom , university of birmingham

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