These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

June 12, 2018 by  
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Farmed seafood, wild-caught fish , or livestock : which one is the most environmentally costly to produce? A University of Washington -led study probed that question by scrutinizing 148 life-cycle assessments for animal protein production. Lead author Ray Hilborn, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences professor, said in a statement , “If you’re an environmentalist, what you eat makes a difference. We found there are obvious good choices, and really obvious bad choices.” (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood Which food type is more environmentally costly to produce — livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? New research from the University of Washington takes a comprehensive look at the environmental impacts of different types of animal protein production. Read more: http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/06/11/choice-matters-the-environmental-costs-of-producing-meat-seafood/ Posted by University of Washington News on Monday, June 11, 2018 Scientists drew on four metrics to compare environmental impacts of different animal proteins: greenhouse gas emissions , energy use, potential to add excess nutrients like fertilizer into the environment, and potential to emit substances that help cause  acid rain . They used 40 grams of protein — around the size of an average burger patty — as their standard amount . Related: Vegan diets deliver more environmental benefits than sustainable dairy or meat Industrial beef production and farmed catfish were the most environmentally costly in general, according to the university. Farmed mollusks such as scallops, oysters, or mussels and small wild-caught fish were the least environmentally costly. The university said capture fish choices like pollock, the cod family, and hake also have relatively low impact, and farmed salmon performed well. But there were differences across animal proteins — for example, the researchers said livestock production consumed less power than most seafood aquaculture as continual water circulation uses up electricity. Farmed tilapia, shrimp, and catfish used the most energy. Beef and catfish aquaculture generated around 20 times more greenhouse gases than chicken , farmed salmon, farmed mollusks, and small capture fisheries. “When compared to other studies of vegetarian and vegan diets, a selective diet of aquaculture and wild capture fisheries has a lower environmental impact than either of the plant-based diets,” according to the university. The journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment published the study this week. Four University of Washington scientists and one scientist from company Avalerion Capital contributed. + University of Washington + Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Images via

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These fish and meat options are the most environmentally costly

New study suggests that plastic waste may be transformed into usable energy

June 12, 2018 by  
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A new study from the Earth Engineering Center (EEC|CCNY) at the Grove School of Engineering of the City College of New York suggests that plastic waste can effectively be converted into usable fuel and energy rather than being dumped in a landfill or polluting the ocean. Researchers found that the addition of non-recycled plastics (NRPs) to a chemical recycling process known as gasification results in the production of crude oil -based fuel. It also reduces pollution, both plastic and emissions, in contrast to traditional methods of disposing of plastic waste, such as incineration or dumping. Plastic is a product derived from crude oil and, as such, contains significant latent energy that can be harnessed using the right technology and technique. “This study demonstrates that because carbon- and hydrogen -rich plastics have high energy content, there is tremendous potential to use technologies like gasification to convert these materials into fuels, chemicals and other products,” study co-author Marco J. Castaldi told Phys.org . As concerns rise over plastic pollution, scientists are looking to reframe plastic as a resource rather than waste . “Plastics have an end-of-life use that will be turning waste into energy, which is something we all need and use,” study co-author Demetra Tsiamis told Phys.org. Related: UN releases first “state of plastics” report on World Environment Day Gasification uses air or steam to heat plastic waste. This results in the creation of industrial gas mixtures called synthesis gas, or syngas. This syngas can either be converted into diesel and petrol or burned directly to generate electricity . This process is preferable to incineration of plastic waste because it allows for the storage of potentially usable energy that otherwise would be wasted through incineration. Gasification is also better for air quality, producing much lower levels of sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions. + Earth Engineering Center Via Phys.org Images via Depositphotos (1, 2)

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New study suggests that plastic waste may be transformed into usable energy

Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

February 28, 2018 by  
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With a global population of 7.6 billion people, there is … The post Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

Can farmed fish save aquaculture?

September 14, 2017 by  
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This is the fastest growing segment of agriculture, and it answers the needs both to make more and use less.

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Can aquaculture save wild fish populations?

February 5, 2017 by  
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Aquaculture is growing at eight percent per year, depleting oceans. Innovators are competing to develop substitutes for fish-derived fish food.

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Innovative urban park in Copenhagen floats nature-infused aquatic islands

March 31, 2016 by  
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Outbreak of mosquito-borne virus is shrinking babies’ brains throughout South America

January 6, 2016 by  
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A rare virus is causing babies to be born with abnormally small brains and skulls, and the number of cases are drastically increasing. The Zika virus is spreading rapidly throughout South America and now Puerto Rico has been added to the list of countries where babies are suffering from the potentially life-threatening microcephaly. In Brazil, thousands of cases have been reported in the past year, and the government is scrambling to address the problem amid criticism for not acting sooner. Babies with this birth defect have been reported in ten Central and South American countries so far, and it is believed that the virus will continue to spread. Read the rest of Outbreak of mosquito-borne virus is shrinking babies’ brains throughout South America

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BREAKING: Genetically engineered salmon approved for human consumption

November 19, 2015 by  
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Today, environmental activists across the US are cringing at the FDA’s announcement  that they have given a variety of genetically engineered salmon the green light, deeming the fish fit for human consumption. The AquAdvantage salmon has been genetically modified to grow twice as fast as regular salmon, so it reaches market weight sooner. While the announcement is disappointing for many, it doesn’t come as a major surprise — the FDA gave it preliminary approval more than five years ago. Read the rest of BREAKING: Genetically engineered salmon approved for human consumption

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2016 Chevy Volt wins ‘Green Car of the Year’ at the Los Angeles Auto Show

November 19, 2015 by  
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Each year at the Los Angeles Auto Show, Green Car Journal announces the winner of its coveted Green Car of the Year award – and this year the winner is… the all-new 2016 Chevy Volt ! This year’s finalists included the Audi A3 e-tron , the Chevy Volt , the Honda Civic , the Hyundai Sonata and Toyota Prius . Green Car Journal has been honoring the most important “green” vehicles each year since 2005, and according to the publication, the number of models to consider has been increasing each year. Read the rest of 2016 Chevy Volt wins ‘Green Car of the Year’ at the Los Angeles Auto Show

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Grow Food at Home with Lettuce Evolve’s Compact Aquaponic Garden

November 25, 2014 by  
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Would you love to grow your own vegetables but think it’s too much hassle? Well, a company in Dallas may have a solution that’s just perfect for you. A new aquaponic planter created by Lettuce Evolve could make fertilizing and harvesting your vegetables simple, green and clean. Read the rest of Grow Food at Home with Lettuce Evolve’s Compact Aquaponic Garden Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aquaculture , aquaponics , chemical free , compact garden , Gardening , grow your own , hydroponics , Lettuce Evolve , vertical farming

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