Get away from it all in this off-grid concrete cabin just steps away from the Appalachian Trail

December 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Get away from it all in this off-grid concrete cabin just steps away from the Appalachian Trail

For those looking to disconnect from the chaos of life, this off-grid retreat is just the place. Tucked into a rocky ridge along the Appalachian Trail, the 160-square-foot Lost Whiskey Cabin was created by the team at GreenSpur  to be a self-sufficient off-grid getaway – with a edgy twist. Clad in raw concrete with large steel-framed windows, the tiny solar-powered structure eschews the traditional log cabin aesthetic for a contemporary industrial vibe. The stunning cabin is the latest addition to the Lost Whiskey Club, an eco-friendly complex that includes a communal farmhouse, mobile whiskey bar, and various off-grid lodging options . Surrounded by 5,800 acres of incredibly scenic protected public land?, the complex is the perfect location for a low key escape from city life. Related: These Australian tiny cabins are designed to help us disconnect The Lost Whiskey Cabin is a unique design that opts for a tough industrial look. Inspired by Scandinavian minimalism , the structure is designed around its primary use: to reconnect with nature. The walls of the cabin are made out of pre-cast concrete panels manufactured in GreenSpur’s own warehouse and later transported to the site. This method allowed the team to not only reduce construction time, but also reduce impact on the land . In addition to the concrete panels, the cabin was has a series of thick steel window frames that provide stunning views. The same steel was used on the cabin’s chimney. The interior design was kept minimal to put the focus on the amazing surroundings. The living space is comprised of a Murphy bed made out of reclaimed wood . The bed doubles as a dining table when not in use. Two singular chairs face a pair of massive floor-to-ceiling glass doors, which open out to an open-air deck that cantilevers out over the landscape. The heart of the cabin, the concrete platform was installed with a Dutch hot tub that, along with a chair and a hammock, lets guests soak up the breathtaking views in complete tranquility. The rest of the home is equipped with all of the basics, mainly furnishings that have multiple uses and were chosen for their flexibility and durability. “With a crackling fire that heats the hot tub, solar panels, cisterns, Murphy bed, shower and compost toilet, this off-grid structure is virtually maintenance-free, and should look and function the same 100 years from now,” says GreenSpur founder Mark Turner. + GreenSpur Via Dwell Photography by Mitch Allen via GreenSpur

Read the original: 
Get away from it all in this off-grid concrete cabin just steps away from the Appalachian Trail

Simple DIY upcycled holiday decor

December 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Simple DIY upcycled holiday decor

Traditional Christmas decorations can quickly get expensive and extremely wasteful. But you can change that in your home this Christmas season by turning everyday household items into holiday decor. All you have to do is take a shopping trip through your house and upcycle old stuff into Christmas decorations. With just a little time and creativity, you can create these holiday decorations for just pennies, and keep the waste at a minimum. Pasta Christmas tree All you need for this project is some raw bowtie pasta, cardboard plates, a hot glue gun, and spray paint. Choose a color of paint that will match your holiday decor, like silver, gold, or green, and paint your pasta before gluing the pieces together to make a tree. This is just the beginning. You can also use penne rigate, fusilli, rotelle, radiatori, ditali lisci, or pasta shells to make a variety of different ornaments. When you watch the video tutorial for this craft, it will give you a creative spark. And, the surprising thing is, the holiday decorations and ornaments don’t even look like pasta when you are done. Toilet paper Santas This is a craft idea that you can do with the kids. All you need is some toilet paper rolls, colored paper, a marker, glue, scissors and string. First, measure and cut a piece of red paper that will fit around the toilet paper roll, then use your marker to draw bricks. Glue the red bricks to your toilet paper roll, then use the red paper again to cut out Santa’s legs and part of his hat. You will need white paper for the “fur trim” of Santa’s hat and pants, and black paper for the toy bag, feet and mittens. Sock monkey ornaments If you have some old sock monkeys hiding in the bottom of the closet, or have some sewing skills, you can create some cute sock monkey ornaments to put on the tree. All you need to make your own sock monkey is a pair of socks, two buttons, cotton stuffing or polyester fiber, scissors and some needle and thread. Wine bottle cork Christmas tree Another super easy idea for upcycled holiday decor is a Christmas tree made from wine bottle corks. You can paint the corks or decorate them with buttons, glitter, and textiles before tying them in red ribbon. Or, you can keep it simple and arrange plain corks (possibly with some red wine stains) into the shape of a tree. Then glue them together and add a decorative ribbon. Bottle light tree With some rebar, wine and/or liquor bottles, and a few strings of Christmas lights, you can create your own bottle light tree to light up your front yard. The possibilities are endless with this project, and the bonus is you have to drink some booze to make it happen. Cinnamon stick candle holder All you need for this idea is some cinnamon sticks, hot glue, some ribbon or lace, and a few holiday embellishments that you can find in your yard, like pine cones. And, in just a few short minutes you will have custom candle holders that will make your house smell amazing throughout the holiday season. Recycled Christmas village You can take this idea and run with it any way you like. You can use plastic containers or mason jars to house trees you can make from paper. And, you can use cereal and snack boxes like BettiJo at Paging Super Mom to create your village . Tech lover wreath Do you have some old computer parts, cell phones, and cords taking up space in your home? Well, stop letting them collect dust and turn them into a holiday wreath. All you need is a wreath form and some old tech to create this cute, geeky decoration. Light bulb garland and ornaments This upcycled holiday decor idea uses old light bulbs, paint, and some ornament hangers. You can add them to some garland or hang them on your tree. And, if you want to take this idea to another level  — and you have some art skills — you can turn the light bulbs into reindeer, snowmen, Santas, or even a grinch with the right paint and crafty accessories. Lanterns It doesn’t get much easier (or cheaper) than this. You will want to start by creating a holiday image with vintage angels and stars, or any other Christmas-inspired thing you can think of. Then, print out your design and cut out a piece that will fit around a soup can and another that will fit a box of matches.  Finally, glue or tape the pieces to the can and matchbox, just don’t cover the striking surface on the box! Images via Personal Creations , Elin B , Diana_rajchel , Shutterstock

Read the original here:
Simple DIY upcycled holiday decor

This couch made from recycled water bottles is built to last a lifetime

December 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This couch made from recycled water bottles is built to last a lifetime

In recent years, companies have started to repurpose the massive amounts of used-once-then-trashed plastic in new and exciting ways. For example, REPREVE, a sustainable fiber created from 100 percent food-quality and BPA-free plastic, is being used in a variety of products from clothing to couches. Lovesac is a green furniture company using the recycled fabric to cover sofa cushions. While the eco-friendly material is a huge component of the design, it’s just a sample of an entire furniture line aimed at sustainability. In a world of disposables, the company’s goals push back with a focus on design for a lifetime. It’s a concept that not only includes durability in its couches, called sactionals, but also caters to the ever-changing needs of seating demands. Related: Repreve — sustainable multi-use fiber made from recycled water bottles The sactional is a versatile, modular design that you can easily customize to fit your space. Simply choose from the many ottoman, seat and side arrangements for the look and seating capacity that suits your needs. Then, arrange and rearrange any way you like. With a lifetime guarantee on the sactional, the company estimates that this grow-with-your-demands product will replace the purchase of four couches during its lifetime. With the introduction of the the Sactional, Lovesac has continued its theme of lifetime products with removable, washable and replaceable covers. Dirty covers can be washed. Torn covers can be replaced. When the now-trendy slate twill color becomes a throwback, you can update it without the cost or waste of replacing the entire couch. Even better, the upholstery fabric for the couches is made from hundreds of tossed single-use water bottles, which are given new life through REPREVE fabric. Depending on the components chosen, between 600-1200 water bottles are used in the production of each Sactional. For 2018 alone, Lovesac expects to repurpose around 11 million water bottles through its efforts. Related: How to recycle a sweater into a cuddly pillow for your couch True to the overarching goal of creating an environmentally-friendly couch, the Sactional is neatly packaged and shipped in bleach and dye-free  recyclable  kraft cardboard. Unlike the traditional sofa set that requires two heavy lifters for transport, when it’s time to relocate to a different level of the house or new home altogether, the entire sectional can be broken down into manageable pieces for the move. + Lovesac Images via Lovesac

See original here: 
This couch made from recycled water bottles is built to last a lifetime

Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods

November 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods

Mass timber construction is growing more popular thanks to efforts like the 2018 Maine Mass Timber Competition , which has prompted elegant and sustainable wood-based designs such as “Long Lodge,” a design concept that won a 2018 Honor Award. Proposed for a specific north-facing property along the Appalachian Trail, the building consists of two wings — one for living and the other for sleeping — joined by a central void that frames views of the “Caribou Pond Trail” that connects to the main trail. The cross-laminated timber building would be elevated off the ground to minimize site impact and would also be wrapped in full-length glazing for direct connections and views of the outdoors. The Long Lodge was designed by a four-person team: Yueqi ‘Jazzy’ Li as the design lead, Shuang Bao, Nan Wei and Braham Berg. To protect the building against winter winds from the west, the designers positioned the building on a north-south axis and installed full-height glazing along the south facade to take advantage of solar gain. Elevated wooden walkways lead to the building and convene in the central outdoor terrace with a lookout point and outdoor grill. The west “living” wing consists of the foyer, lounge, food bar, dining area, library, meeting rooms, a kitchen, food storage and a gear storage/drying room. The “sleeping” wing on the opposite side comprises all the sleeping areas, bathrooms and a staff room. Built with cross-laminated timber for everything from the roof trusses and structural panels to the columns and beams, the building is set on insulated continuous footing foundation. Related: MIT develops a sustainable, mass timber-building prototype modeled after the longhouse “The elegant horizontality of the lodge, punctured by the verticality of native pines, bring to mind the pairing of the most fundamental forms,” the design team explained in their project statement. “An upside down glulam timber truss provides a single roof pitch outside but two opposing slopes inside. The truss makes for an efficient use of material as well as providing flexibility for employing other building systems. As the building pinches in the middle and fans out toward the ends, these trusses accommodate varying spans of 25’-60’. Each truss is supported by a series of posts and beams near their ends and a CLT panel in the middle that does the heavy lifting.” + Maine Mass Timber Images by Yueqi ‘Jazzy’ Li, Shuang Bao, Nan Wei and Braham Berg

See original here: 
Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods

Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape

November 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape

Located in the mountainous area of Filefjell, Norway, a stunning, solitary cabin peeks out over the snow-covered landscape. Designed by Oslo-based firm  Helen & Hard Architects , the beautiful Gubrandslie Cabin, which is made out of prefabricated solid wood panels, is designed to provide a low-impact shelter that can withstand the extreme climate characterized by harsh wind and snow. Located on the border of Jotunheimen National Park, the private, 1,184-square-foot home is sturdy enough to withstand the weather while simultaneously leaving  minimal impact on the pristine landscape. Large snow falls can wreck havoc on structures in this area, so the architects built the cabin to be inherently sheltered from the elements. Related: Contemporary ski chalet boasts gorgeous panoramic views and a low-energy footprint The first step in creating the  resilient design was to research the local climate and geography. Using extensive wind studies as a guide, the architects formed the home’s volume into an L-shape to mimic the slope of the landscape. Additionally, the cabin is integrated deep into the terrain to protect it from the elements. The roofs are slightly slanted in order to make it easier for the wind and snow to blow over the structure, avoiding heavy snow loads. Using the same climate to the home’s advantage, the architects were focused on creating a serene living space that took full advantage of the stunning, wintry landscape. The volume of the cabin is divided into three levels that follow the topography. The ground floor, which is embedded into the landscape, houses a sauna as well as the garage and plenty of storage. On the first floor, an all-glass facade makes up the entryway, which leads into a spacious, open-plan living area. The living, kitchen and dining space was orientated to face another wall of floor-to-ceiling glass panels , providing breathtaking views of the exterior landscape. On the back side of the cabin, which houses the bedrooms, clerestory windows follow the length of the structure, allowing natural light to flow into the spaces without sacrificing privacy. + Helen & Hard Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Rasmus Norlander and Ragnar Hartvig via Helen & Hard Architects

Originally posted here:
Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape

Artist Builds Awesome "Magical" Timber Homes (Video)

August 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Artist Builds Awesome "Magical" Timber Homes (Video)

Image credit: Shwood Eyewear Whether it’s a tiny, off-grid home for $2500 or DIY Appalachian Gothic architecture from recycled pallet wood , unconventional, natural homes are often as much about personal expression as they are sustainable building. And that certainly holds true of the incredible, fantasy-like structures build by one Washington artist/home builder. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

See original here: 
Artist Builds Awesome "Magical" Timber Homes (Video)

More Oil Leaking At Gulf Spill Site Now Stretches For 10 Miles (Video)

August 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on More Oil Leaking At Gulf Spill Site Now Stretches For 10 Miles (Video)

Reports continue to emerge about another oil leak in the same field that the Deepwater Horizon was tapping when it caught fire and ultimately led to the largest oil spill in US history. Examiner.com has some aerial footage, taken by On Wings of Care , showing that this new leak in the Macondo oil field has become a massive new oil slick…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

See the original post here: 
More Oil Leaking At Gulf Spill Site Now Stretches For 10 Miles (Video)

5 DIY motorcycles created for a zero emission ride

August 23, 2011 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 DIY motorcycles created for a zero emission ride

A Dutta: Electric Bike Cruise along with a high dose of oxygen. DIY offers a great and often the simplest alternative to anyone who might be interested in energy conservation and the ways in which we can protect the environment. So, it’s time you switched gears to cool and green-loving rides. Check out these muscled machines with a heart, built by some really green folks. 1. Sensei Ninja 250 DIY Electric motorcycle The Sensei DIY, cooked up by Bill Mills is based on the popular Kawasaki Ninja 250. Though many bikers might sigh at the prospect of a bike without its trademark ‘vrooom’, remember, this electric bike powered by 24 aviation grade lithium iron phosphate batteries has zero emission. The Sensei (which means master in Japanese) can reach a top speed of 55 miles/hr with a range of approximately 30 miles. Ninja nerds will also be pleased to know that the battery’s density puts this DIY machine in the same league as the real 250 when it comes to weight and center of gravity. This bike is a perfect ride for the congested urban space. 2. DIY Electric Motorcycle Kawasaki 22-year-old Tom Miceli’s final year project as a student at the Appalachian State University might just throw Kawasaki out of business. All those years of dirt biking came in handy when he decided to open up a ‘96 Kawasaki ZX6 Ninja and got to work and what came out is a DIY electric motorcycle capable of clocking 70 mph, with a range of 60 miles. Piling up the shapes from his favorite bikes Miceli stayed ambitious and gave the bike a very sleek, futuristic design, but also kept in mind the pocket of the average biker. It has a 600cc engine and two dozen 40 Ah lithium iron phosphate batteries. Plus, the bike retains its original weight, along with a considerably similar center of gravity. It takes six hours for a 110 volt outlet to recharge the battery. The bike can’t do wheelies. But Miceli’s working on the bike, and he’s recruited his dad, an electrical engineer, into the team, who helped him with the wiring. $ 12,000, which is how much the ION cost him, might have been too much if he hadn’t been covered by his local college. 3. Eco DIY: Beach Cruiser Bicycle This is one of the cool DIY that can be tried by beginners. A father and son took a beach cruiser bicycle and turned it into a 48 volt electric motorcycle. This 15 horsepower motorcycle boasts of zero emission, powered by a Briggs and Stratton Etek electric motor; enough to pull up around 30 mph for a few hours. Not quick enough for you? Well, It saves trees! 4. DIY electric bike Don’t want to buy a new tree-loving bike? Ever wondered how to go green with your existing bike? Engineers Jeff Radtke and Hands Noeldner have crafted an electric powered bicycle wheel. This wheel can be hooked up to almost any bike, and it gives you about 10-20 miles on each charge. A Dewalt 36 V battery pack gives a maximum speed of 28 mph and a high dose of the purest O2. 5. DIY Electric Kawasaki Motorcycle by Benjamin Nelson Benjamin Nelson went to a website and bought a Briggs & Stratton ETEK motor. Then from a farm store he dug out a sprocket and chain. His only power tool was a lone drill. Now he noiselessly cruises everywhere with a 15 mile range at 40 mph. Talk about DIY! He modestly claims that because his bike has no vibrations or noise, he can now ‘hear the birds’ while riding. Can’t beat that!

See the rest here:
5 DIY motorcycles created for a zero emission ride

Stealth snowmobiles are in the offing for the Canadian forces

August 23, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Stealth snowmobiles are in the offing for the Canadian forces

Ayan Sengupta: Stealth Snowmobile Hybrid Electric Snowmobile Defense forces around the world are known to operate in harsh climatic conditions. To operate in such conditions they require specialized equipment and gears. Snowmobile is one such machine which is used by armed forces around the world to ferry goods and personnel over snowy surfaces. Now thanks to the efforts of the Canadian armed forces, the good old snowmobile will now become stealthy. Department of National Defence in Canada is planning to build stealthy snowmobiles. A tender in this regard has already been issued to the potential manufacturers. An amount of $550,000 has already been set aside by the department for development of the machine. These snowmobiles would be used by the Canadian forces in the Arctic region which is under Canadian control. These stealthy snowmobiles would greatly enhance Canadian military’s ability to undertake covert operations in the far reaches areas of the north. These stealthy snowmobiles would also be eco-friendly since they would be powered by hybrid engines instead of the conventional combustion engines that power the snowmobiles of today. These future snowmobiles would be quieter compared to the existing ones. That is where the stealth feature of the machine comes in. The noise level of the existing snowmobiles cannot be reduced and this high noise level acts as a big handicap when it comes to undertaking covert missions. Electric engines are being seen as a potential solution to this problem since it would replace the combustion engine and will be powered by a much quieter electric motor. According to the tender, the snowmobiles would have to have a range of at least 15 km with an average speed of 20 km/h when it operates in the quiet electric mode. In the gas mode, it would have to have a range of at least 100 km with an average speed of 30 km/h. The vehicle should also have a top speed of 75 km/h and a payload capacity of at least 250 kg on a sled. This tender follows a slew of measures taken by the new Conservative Government in order to bolster the fledgling Canadian military. Via: CTV

Read more here:
Stealth snowmobiles are in the offing for the Canadian forces

Attend Tribeca Film Festival At Home To See "Climate of Change"

April 21, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Attend Tribeca Film Festival At Home To See "Climate of Change"

A group of middle school students in India protest plastics. Image courtesy of Participant Media.

See more here:
Attend Tribeca Film Festival At Home To See "Climate of Change"

Bad Behavior has blocked 1142 access attempts in the last 7 days.