SCAD students fight food insecurity in Georgia with organic farming and beekeeping

May 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

For a break from schoolwork, students at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) have been swapping their laptops for shovels and seedlings at SCAD Back40, the university’s new one-acre “farm.” Created as a legacy project to celebrate SCAD’s 40th anniversary, the agricultural initiative features a wide range of seasonal, organically grown crops as well as a growing apiary with 16 beehives actively managed by students. Produce is regularly donated to America’s Second Harvest of Coastal Georgia, with 1,000 units of leafy greens sent to the non-profit food back in the fall and winter quarters of 2018. Located in Hardeeville, South Carolina across the bridge from Savannah, Georgia, Back40 occupies rural land just a short drive from the bustle of cars and urban life. Back40 Project Manager Jody Elizabeth Trumbull oversees the agricultural initiative with the help of student volunteers from varying backgrounds, ranging from UX design to architecture. Because Back40 employs active crop rotation methods, soil management, companion planting and other natural growing methods —  organic certification is currently in progress — for producing seasonal crops, SCAD prefers to call the project a “farm” rather than a “garden.” The one-acre plot has the potential to grow up to five acres. While Back40 has yet to incorporate livestock and poultry, it does feature an apiary with 16 honey-producing hives and nearly 350,000 bees. Each hive can produce 80 to 100 pounds of honey. In addition to supporting the declining bee population, the apiary fits with SCAD’s image — the university’s mascot is the bee. To provide enough food for both managed and native bees, SCAD has planted a wide range of flowers to support both bee populations. When wild beehives are found on campus buildings, they are safely removed and relocated to the apiary. Related: SCAD artist turns recycled materials into giant puppets to revitalize a historic French village Back40 produced 1,000 units of kale, Brussels sprouts, radishes, shard, cardoon and three types of lettuce in the first two quarters of operation. Part of the yield is donated to America’s Second Harvest of Coastal Georgia to help fight food insecurity, while the remaining produce is used at SCAD dining venues. As an educational tool for conservation, Back40 offers learning experiences not just for its students, but for local schools and organizations as well. In the future, the urban farm’s non-food commodity items will also be used in SCAD fine arts and design programs, such as the new business of beauty and fragrance program. + Savannah College of Art and Design Images via SCAD

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SCAD students fight food insecurity in Georgia with organic farming and beekeeping

The largest solar farm apiary in the US opens this week

June 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

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An important feature of permaculture is the concept of stacking functions, or finding multiple uses for the same space or resource. North Carolina-based PineGate Renewables is taking this principle to a new level with the opening of the largest solar farm apiary in the U.S.  Starting this week, the Eagle Point solar farm in Jackson County, Oregon will host 48 hives of honey bees underneath and between the solar panels. John Jacob of Old Sol Apiaries helped to determine the site’s suitability and will serve as the caretaker of the bees. “In 2016/17, Oregon beekeepers reported losing nearly one-third of all honey bee colonies statewide,” Jacob said. “The pollinator-friendly solar sites Pine Gate Renewables is developing can play an important role in helping address the population crisis among our managed and native pollinators.” Studies conducted on solar farm apiaries in the U.K.  suggest these kinds of hybrid projects can increase the bee and insect pollinator population in a region, thus benefiting the natural environment and agricultural farms. A new study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology found that there are more than 16,000 acres of pollinator-dependent crops near 204 megawatts of solar energy facilities in Oregon alone. Related: Bee Saving Paper “works like an energy drink for bees” PineGate Renewables’ SolarCulture sites are planted with low-ground native flowers and grasses, which boost soil health, store storm water and support a healthy ecology. The specific vegetation plan for the Oregon site was designed by Colorado -based ecological services firm Regenerate, and by spring 2019, this site is expected to provide pollinator habitat equivalent to about 24,800 homes with 6’ x 12’ pollinator gardens maintained for 25 years. In the future, the buzz about PineGate Renewables’ pollinator project may inspire others to join forces to serve the public and the environment with solar farm apiaries. + PineGate Renewables + Old Sol Apiaries Images via PineGateRenewables

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The largest solar farm apiary in the US opens this week

This colorful Bienenhaus is a bee castle that provides sanctuary for 16 beehives

June 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

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Read the rest of This colorful Bienenhaus is a bee castle that provides sanctuary for 16 beehives Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alps , apiary , bee hives , beekeeping , bees , Bienenhaus #3 , honey , honeybees , italy , Massimiliano Dell’Olivo , small structures , wooden structure

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This colorful Bienenhaus is a bee castle that provides sanctuary for 16 beehives

18 Green Gifts for the Home

November 30, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

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  A house becomes a home when it’s filled with the energy of those who live there, and the houseware items  we’ve put together for this year’s gift guide can help make a home as luminous and eco-friendly as possible. Recycled glass tumblers, sustainable bamboo bowls, and the cutest little hedgehog dryer buddies ever are just a few of the gems  we’ve found that can help make this holiday the greenest yet. GREEN ECO-GIFTS FOR THE HOME > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adjust-a-bowl , apartment laundry machine , apiary , bamboo bowls , bamboo cutting board , bamboo toothbrushes , bee hive , beehive , bowl , bowl covers , bowls , candle , candles , castile soap , compost , compost pail , cork , Cork Bowl , cotton bowl covers , cotton paper towels , countertop compost pail , cutting board , Dr. Bronners , dryer hedgehogs , eco candle , eco christmas , eco friendly presents , eco holiday , eco soy candle , eco xmas , eco-friendly gifts , eco-friendly gifts for the home , environmentally friendly gifts , environmentally friendly presents , gifts for the home , green christmas , green gift guide , green holiday , green holidaygift guide , green presents , green xmas , guest toothbrush , hedgehogs , hemp produce bags , home gifts , home presents , household gifts , household presents , Kikkerland , laundry pod , map coasters , neighbourhoods , organic cotton , produce bags , recycled glass , recycled glasses , soy candles , stainless steel straws , steel straws , straws , throw blankets , Williams-Sonoma

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18 Green Gifts for the Home

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