Antony Gibbon’s Flux House is a modern-day moat

March 19, 2018 by  
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Architect Antony Gibbon  has unveiled yet another incredible structure – this one designed for a future world where homes float on water . The circular Flux House features two rings of thin timber panels , equally spaced around the frame in order to illuminate the interior with a soft diffusion of natural light. Four walkways provide access to the home, which has a large swimming pool at its center. The main house is designed to sit upon a large body of water, creating the effect of a modern-day moat. The timber slats in the facade not only let in natural light, but allow for light to reflect off the water and into the structure. Related: Antony Gibbon’s Lucent House is a serene minimalist retreat made of glass and stone The interior maintains the home’s  circular shape , with the living and dining areas on one side and the bedrooms on the other. The swimming pool, accessible from any room, serves as the focal point of the building. The Flux House design is conceptual at the moment, but, like most of Antony Gibbon’s designs , it could very well be used as a private home or off-grid resort. + Antony Gibbon Images via Antony Gibbons

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Antony Gibbon’s Flux House is a modern-day moat

Tactile ‘Cabin of Curiosities’ was built with 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles

March 19, 2018 by  
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We’ve already established that San Francisco-based Emerging Objects (founded by Ronald Rael) is quickly becoming the king of innovative 3D printing , but their latest design is taking the world of 3D architecture to new levels. The Cabin of Curiosities is an amazing tiny house, built with more than 4,500 3D printed ceramic tiles. Through a strategic arrangement, the front facade is integrated with the company’s “planter tile” system, which creates a base for a garden wall. The exterior of the cabin is a textural facade made up of thousands of 3D printed tiles . The unique facade system incorporates the company’s own creation called “Seed Stitch” walls. The system, which is named for a knitting technique, involves printing the tiles at extremely high speeds resulting in deliberate anomalies. The batch of uneven tiles looks like they were handmade, giving the structure a unique character. Using galvanized metal J moldings, the tiles are hung on the frame of the building. Related: 10 ways 3D printing is disrupting the architecture industry On the interior, the cabin’s walls are clad with the company’s translucent “Chroma Curl Wall”. Made with a bio-based plastic derived from corn, the texture and aesthetic are another feature unique to Emerging Objects . The interior is lit by color-changing LED lights giving the space a trippy, but serene feel. The interior has been decorated with several of Emerging Objects’ own creations such as 3D printed furniture , pottery, and lamps. The design for the cabin, which recently made its debut at SXSW, has been a long-time coming for the innovative designers. According to Emerging Objects, the structure is a culmination of various years of 3D innovation and shows how 3D printing is pushing the world of architecture forward. + Emerging Objects Via Archinect Photos by Matthew Millman va Emerging Objects

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Tactile ‘Cabin of Curiosities’ was built with 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles

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