Trump allows commercial fishing in Atlantic national monument

June 9, 2020 by  
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The Trump administration announced on Friday that the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, which encompasses over 5,000 square miles of the Atlantic Ocean 130 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, will open to commercial fishing. The announcement came after the president attended a round-table discussion with commercial fishers from Maine who were concerned about the economic tolls of COVID-19 in their industry. Ocean experts are cautioning that the decision will cause comprehensive harm to the environment in the long run, especially as the proclamation will allow fishing within the monument without changing its size or boundaries. Brad Sewell, senior director of Oceans for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a statement that such a significant change to a monument must be done by Congress. Sewell cited that the Antiquities Act gives the president the power to protect specific natural areas, not the other way around. The 5,000-square-mile ocean monument is home to sea turtles, endangered whales, unique species of cold water coral reefs , four extinct underwater volcanoes and deep sea canyons teeming with marine life. Related: Sea turtles thrive on empty beaches during COVID-19 lockdowns The Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument has been open to sport fishing but closed to commercial fishing (with the exception of the red crab and lobster) since its creation in 2016 by President Obama. Any continuing fisheries were given a 7-year transition period to end their operations in the area by 2023. The Seamounts monument has been no stranger to controversy, even before Trump’s recent decision. A year after its designation, five commercial fishing groups sued the Obama administration because they felt the president had created the monument illegally. Now, Trump’s announcement raises the question of the limits of presidential powers regarding changing the rules of national monuments altogether. National Geographic’s Pristine Seas founder Enric Sala told National Geographic that these types of national monuments are established to preserve the country’s natural and historical sites. “We need pristine areas set aside so that we can see nature as it was before we overexploited it, and understand the true impact of fishing,” Sala said. “If commercial fishing were allowed in a monument, it would become just a name on a map, and no different than any other place in the ocean.” Via National Geographic Image via NOAA

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Trump allows commercial fishing in Atlantic national monument

Egyptians discover three 1,000-year-old sunken ships full of treasure

November 27, 2017 by  
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Egyptian officials revealed last week that archaeologists located three sunken ships off the country’s northern coast in Alexandria, Egypt’s Abu Qir Bay. The wrecks, determined to be of Roman origin , were discovered filled with ancient artifacts dating back at least 1,000 years. Included in the excavated bounty were gold coins issued during the reign of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus Caesar Octavian (Julius Caesar was his great-uncle), as well as pottery, and a “royal head of crystal.” As MSN writes, the Ministry of Antiquities’ Underwater Archaeology Department and the European Institute of Underwater Archaeology have been working since September to locate and disentomb the ship’s contents from the sunken city of Heraclion. Heraclion sits beneath the bay and is believed to be one of the world’s most archaeologically rich sites. In fact, the team of archaeologists is in the process of locating a fourth sunken ship in the bay. Related: Scientists just discovered evidence of a hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza The finds are a boon for Egypt, which has been in a state of political unrest since the uprisings of 2011. Looters have used mass protests as a cover to both steal and defile artifacts, including those housed in the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square. As such, Egypt’s antiquity authorities are sharing their new finds with gusto across global channels, including Facebook. Via MSN Images via the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities Facebook page

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Egyptians discover three 1,000-year-old sunken ships full of treasure

Archaeologists discover ancient lost city in Egypt

November 25, 2016 by  
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Archaeologists have unearthed an Egyptian city dating all the way back to the first dynasty. The discovery was made across the Nile river from the city of Luxor in the province of Sohag. Hope for a revival in the country’s waning tourism industry has grown since uncovering the area rife with ancient huts, tools, and even a cemetery for royalty. The city’s remains were discovered a mere 400 meters from the temple of Seti I, according to The Guardian . It may also provide clues into the operations of Abydos, one of the most ancient cities in all of Egypt . So far, huts, tools made of iron, pottery shards, and large graves have been uncovered. These findings lead officials to believe the spot once housed high-ranking dignitaries and grave builders. Related: Secret tunnel sealed 1,800 years ago offers clues to mysterious ancient city in Mexico “The size of the graves discovered in the cemetery is larger in some instances than royal graves in Abydos dating back to the first dynasty, which proves the importance of the people buried there and their high social standing during this early era of ancient Egyptian history,” the antiquities ministry said. Since 2010, the country’s tourism has been steadily declining from its 14.7 million annual visitors. In the first quarter of this year, only 1.2 million tourists circulated through, down from last year’s 2.2 million. The discovery could mean a renewed interest in sightseeing for Egypt, especially as more information is learned about the site and its history. Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia ( 1 , 2 )

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Archaeologists discover ancient lost city in Egypt

House Republicans Hope to Block President Obama’s Ability to Form New National Monuments

March 25, 2014 by  
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House Republicans are hoping to pass a bill tomorrow that would limit the ability of the president to designate new national monuments. The bill is called the “Ensuring Public Involvement in the Creation of National Monuments Act,” and if it becomes law, it would essentially make it more difficult for the president to use the 108 year old Antiquities Act, which allows him or her to appoint new monuments. Some environmentalists, however, have renamed the bill the “ No New National Parks” bill , and worry that it would prevent future efforts towards conserving America’s land. Read the rest of House Republicans Hope to Block President Obama’s Ability to Form New National Monuments Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Antiquities Act , appointing new monuments , appointing new national parks , blocking national monuments , California Coastal Monument , Cesar E. Chavez National Monument , conservation , Ensuring Public Involvement in the Creation of National Monuments Act , Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument , land conservation , National Monuments , National Monuments Bill , No New National Parks , protecting national parks , Protecting the environment , Representative Rob Bishop , Rob Bishop , Theodore Roosevelt Antiquities Act        

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House Republicans Hope to Block President Obama’s Ability to Form New National Monuments

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