Antibiotic-resistant "nightmare" bacteria are spreading across the US

April 4, 2018 by  
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A new breed of “nightmare” bacteria resists pretty much all of our antibiotics – and it’s rapidly spreading across the US. The bacteria – called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) – is different from your run-of-the-mill antibiotic-resistant bacteria because it is incredibly deadly, with 50 percent of infected patients dying. Not only that, but it is spreading like “wildfire” with over 200 cases identified in 27 states. Researchers at the CDC said that last year they tested  5,700 samples of resistant bacteria, and of those samples, 221 were CRE or similar bacteria. That’s a full 15 percent. “I was surprised by the numbers” of bacteria with unusual antibiotic resistance, Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the CDC, said. “This was more than I was expecting.” Once researchers detected these bacteria, they tested other patients in the same facility to see if the bacteria had spread. It turned out that 1 in 10 people had what scientists call a “silent” infection, where they have the bacteria in their bodies but aren’t showing symptoms. Related: Flesh-eating bacteria might be spread by mosquitoes in Australia Fortunately, doctors have a plan. They are working hard to stop the spread before it becomes common. To that end, the CDC created the Antibiotic Resistance Laboratory Network (ARLN) to test and track for these dangerous bacteria. Using an aggressive containment strategy, researchers have been able to control the infection. But the danger isn’t over – doctors and scientists will have to be vigilant to stay ahead of the antibiotic-resistance trend as bacteria continue to evolve and change to evade our efforts. Via Live Science Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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Antibiotic-resistant "nightmare" bacteria are spreading across the US

Superbug resistant to last-resort antibiotics found on US pig farm

December 9, 2016 by  
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Antibiotic resistance is a looming public health concern expected to kill up to 10 million people annually by 2050. Now, in the latest worrying development in the United States, Ohio State University researchers have found a bacteria resistant to last resort antibiotics, called carbapenems, on a pig farm that is barred from using them. The pig farm followed what the researchers describe as “typical US production practices” by giving their animals the antibiotic ceftiofur. Newborn pigs receive the antibiotic when they’re born, and when males are castrated, they’re given another dose. Ceftiofur is part of the cephalosporin family, but kills bacteria in a manner comparable to carbapenems. Related: ‘Nightmare’ bacteria found in the U.S. resists all known antibiotics The Ohio State researchers collected samples from the pig farm for five months to discover the superbug, Enterobacteriaceae , which Natural Resources Defense Council expert David Wallinga described in a blog post as “one of the nastier superbugs.” The journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy published the researchers’ study online this week. Study co-author Thomas Wittum told TIME, “How the [resistant bacteria] got onto the farm we really don’t know. But probably it was introduced from the outside from movements of wildlife, people, equipment, etc.” During the study the researchers didn’t discover the bacteria in the pigs, but Wittum told TIME they later did see the superbug in piglets and sows. He said, “…that is the concern: that it could happen on this or other farms .” What does this discovery mean for US agriculture? In 2012, the Obama administration established guidelines that will go into effect in January 2017. The guidelines would limit the use of antibiotics on farms, but they are voluntary. Meanwhile, according to Mother Jones, advisers to the new President-elect appear to be resistant to regulation when it comes to food production. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the bacteria found on the pig farm already kills as many as 600 people every year. Via TIME and Mother Jones Images via Wikimedia Commons and Pixabay

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Superbug resistant to last-resort antibiotics found on US pig farm

Student discovers a way to destroy superbug bacteria without antibiotics

September 28, 2016 by  
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A 25-year-old student has discovered a way to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria without pummeling them with more antibiotics . Shu Lam successfully destroyed superbugs in lab tests using a star-shaped polymer that literally rips the cells to shreds. This breakthrough could signal a complete overhaul in how the medical community approaches these deadly bacteria . Currently, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ), kill 700,000 people per year. Scientists are worried that number could skyrocket to 10 million by the year 2050 , so they’re searching for ways to successful intervene before more damage is done. University of Melbourne student Shu Lam believes she may have found a solution. Related: ‘Nightmare’ bacteria found in the U.S. resists all known antibiotics Her study , published in Nature Microbiology , details the mechanism of SNAPPs, or structurally nanoengineered antimicrobial peptide polymers . SNAPPs work by directly targeting, attacking, and destabilizing the cell membranes of superbugs. They are large enough that they do not affect healthy cells, which are affected by conventional approaches that “poison” the bacteria. So far, Lam has successfully tested SNAPPs on six different strains of superbugs in a laboratory setting, and one in live mice. In each experiment, the nasty bacteria were all killed and did not develop resistance to the polymers in future generations. The development is still in its early phases, yet Lam and her team believe they are onto something big. Via Science Alert Images via Wikipedia , Flickr

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Student discovers a way to destroy superbug bacteria without antibiotics

Mesmerizing Abyss Horizon table recreates the oceans dramatic depths

September 28, 2016 by  
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Unlike Duffy London’s previous iterations, the Abyss Horizon is circular rather than rectangular. This table, in addition to being a striking conversation starter, is made to order and handcrafted by local artisans and in-house craftsmen. The layers of cut glass create the illusion of a bottomless sinkhole in the center of a table. The light-colored wood that surfaces at the top mimic islands and landforms with sandy white beaches and aquamarine waters. Related: Amazing Abyss Table Layers Glass and Wood to Mimic the Depths of the Ocean Blue The Abyss Horizon Table is limited to 25 editions and can be made and delivered within 12 to 14 weeks. Price is available upon request. “‘I was looking into sheets of thick glass at my glass manufacturer’s factory, and noticed how the material darkened as they added more layers – the same way the sea does as it deepens,” said Christopher Duffy about his inspiration behind the Abyss tables. “I wanted to use this effect to replicate a real piece of the earth’s sea bed. Like a mythical power had lifted a perfect rectangle straight from the earth’s crust to use as his personal ornament.” The Abyss Horizon is available to view through the Sarah Myerscough Gallery . + Duffy London Images via Duffy London

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Mesmerizing Abyss Horizon table recreates the oceans dramatic depths

Antibiotic resistant bugs could kill 10 million people each year by 2050

May 19, 2016 by  
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Economist Lord Jim O’Neill recently released a report detailing the costs of not fighting antibiotic resistance . Bacteria resistance to drugs appears to have worsened, and O’Neill’s report revealed that by 2050, 10 million people every year could perish from drug-resistant bugs if we don’t take action. O’Neill suggested that pharmaceutical companies should be required to invest in research to develop new, effective antibiotics . He also said doctors should stop dishing out antibiotics unless a person truly needs them, discerned through rapid testing. If a rapid test doesn’t exist, it must be developed and subsidized for developing countries. Related: New super-strain of E. coli resists all known antibiotics “I find it incredible that doctors must still prescribe antibiotics based only on their immediate assessment of a patient’s symptoms, just like they used to when antibiotics first entered common use in the 1950’s,” O’Neill said . “We must stop treating antibiotics like sweets, which is what we are doing around the world today.” O’Neill didn’t stop there. He attacked the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in the food industry, particularly in the United States, although the practice is widespread. According to The Guardian, one of “the antibiotics of last resort,” Colistin, was recently found to be ineffective in China, where it had been given to farm animals. O’Neill said, “In some parts of the world, probably in the largest emerging economies and and almost definitely in the United States, the use of antibiotics in animals is greater than in humans and that means the misuse is probably higher too.” Implementing O’Neill’s suggestions wouldn’t be cheap. In his report, he said enacting his proposals could cost $40 billion over the course of 10 years. But inaction comes with a heftier price tag. O’Neill estimates the cost to society to be potentially $100 trillion every year. Even worse would be the cost in millions of human lives. Via The Guardian Images via Pixabay and Wikimedia Commons

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Antibiotic resistant bugs could kill 10 million people each year by 2050

FDA Demands Proof from Manufacturers that Antibacterial Soaps are Safe

December 17, 2013 by  
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Image © Shutterstock After years of research indicating that antibacterial chemicals in common household products may be causing health problems in consumers, the US Food and Drug Administration has finally decided to ask for proof that these substances are safe. If manufacturers can’t provide information on the safety of these compounds, they may be forced to remove them from their products completely. Read the rest of FDA Demands Proof from Manufacturers that Antibacterial Soaps are Safe Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: antibacterial soaps , antibiotic resistance , antimicrobial soaps , consumer safety laws , fda , Food and Drug Administration , hand sanitizers , hormone disrupters , liquid hand soap , triclosan , US public health laws        

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FDA Demands Proof from Manufacturers that Antibacterial Soaps are Safe

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