Scientists report enormous Texas-sized melting in Antarctica

June 16, 2017 by  
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A recent snowmelt event in West Antarctica could provide scientists with more information to understand how climate change will alter our world. A team of 14 scientists from American and Australian institutions documented widespread melting that happened in 2016, precipitated largely by warm winds from El Niño . An unusually hot summer didn’t help either. We have evidence warm waters are melting ice shelves in Antarctica, but this event was one of the first instances where researchers were able to document how warm air could induce melting from the skies. An area of West Antarctica more than double the size of California partially melted in January 2016. The Ross Ice Shelf’s surface had a sheet of meltwater that remained for up to 15 days in some locations. And as luck would have it, researchers had just deployed instruments to measure the environment just before the melt event happened. Dan Lubin of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography said, “These atmospheric measurements will help geophysical scientists develop better physical models for projecting how the Antarctic ice sheet might respond to a changing climate and influence sea level rise .” Related: Massive chunk of Antarctic ice shelf likely to break away soon Warm air from El Niño influenced the mass melting. Such melt event usually happen when westerly winds are weak, but scientists say this event was unique because the westerly winds were strong during the melt event. Without those winds the melting might have been even worse. David Bromwich, geography professor at The Ohio State University , said in a statement, “…because we expect stronger, more frequent El Niños in the future with a warming climate, we can expect more major surface melt events in West Antarctica.” If melting happens more often, the ice sheet would deteriorate faster, he said. The journal Nature Communications published the research online this week. Via The Ohio State University and The Washington Post Images via Colin Jenkinson, Australian Bureau of Meteorology and Julien Nicolas, The Ohio State University

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Scientists report enormous Texas-sized melting in Antarctica

London could be getting its first ultra-green, tidal-powered school

June 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

London-based Curl la Tourelle Head Architecture just unveiled plans for what could become London’s greenest building – a tidal powered school situated on the banks of the Thames River. The five-story building would be entirely powered by energy harvested from a series of large turbines built underneath the waterway. According to the proposal, the school’s location is key to the tidal power project. Currently, the proposed site is being used as a city trash collection center where boats pick up and transport the city’s refuse to a landfill outside of the city. However, this exact site happens to be located on the narrowest section of the Thames – the point in the river with the highest velocity of tidal surge. Related: Is tidal power finally coming of age? “As far west as Teddington, the power of the coastal tides is felt twice daily along the Thames, with a rise and fall of as much seven metres of water,” said Wayne Head, one of the studio’s two directors. “The movement of water due to tides represents an untapped source of power that it’s high time London harnessed for good,” he told Dezeen . “The site is located directly at the narrowest section of the Thames – meaning that the velocity of the tidal flow at this point will be the highest in the river. The plan is to capture this four-times daily energy through submerged tidal turbines as the primary means to supply the building with carbon neutral power.” The proposal, which will be built to meet the Passivhaus standard as well as the BEEAM Outstanding rating, calls for using the building’s natural environment of clean air and cooler temperatures to create a pleasant microclimate on the interior. The school would also be installed with a number of carbon monitoring systems that would help the occupants limit their carbon footprint as much as possible. Additionally, the various renewable materials used in the structure would be left exposed to serve as an example for future architecture projects. Although the proposal is at its very early stages, the architect envisions the carbon neutral project as not only the city’s greenest building, but also a beacon for future of sustainable architecture in the city, “The Thames Tidal Powered School is potentially London’s greenest public building,” he said. “The design is conceived as an exemplar of low embodied energy and carbon construction technologies, using natural and bio-renewable materials sourced through local supply chains.” + Curl la Tourelle Head Architecture Via Dezeen Renderings by Forbes Massie

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London could be getting its first ultra-green, tidal-powered school

New Study of Giant Antarctic Ice Core Sheds Light on Thousands of Years of Climate History

August 24, 2012 by  
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Antarctica Photo from Shutterstock Published this week in Nature Magazine , a new study by an international group of polar scientists offers the first comprehensive reconstruction of thousands of years of the Earth’s climate history. The chemical analysis of a 364m long ice core collected from James Ross Island in the Antarctic Peninsula reveals likely causes of the recent ice-shelves break-up and accelerating glacier mass loss. Read the rest of New Study of Giant Antarctic Ice Core Sheds Light on Thousands of Years of Climate History Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: antarctica melting , British Antarctic Survey (BAS) , Climate Change , climate study , global warming , James Ross Island , melting glaciers , melting ice caps , Nature Magazine , polar expedition , Robert Mulvaney , scientific research

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New Study of Giant Antarctic Ice Core Sheds Light on Thousands of Years of Climate History

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