Facial deformities in Uganda apes linked to pesticide use

August 29, 2017 by  
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Our pesticides may be harming animals that live nearby, according to new research. A group of 10 scientists led by Paris’ Musée de l’Homme and the Great Ape Conservation Project at Kibale National Park in Uganda found baboons and chimpanzees with facial deformities near an agricultural area where they were told around eight pesticides had been used. 25 percent of chimpanzees the researchers monitored displayed abnormalities like reduced nostrils, reproductive issues, hypopigmentation, cleft lip, or limb deformities. Kibale National Park is close to industrial tea plantations and gardens growing maize, which are often raided by the chimps and baboons, according to the researchers. But it appears pesticides in the crops they’re taking are harming them. Related: Bee-killing pesticides have been found in US drinking water The researchers asked people in tea factories and villages what pesticides were being used, and were told of eight: glyphosate , cypermethrin, profenofos, mancozeb, metalaxyl, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos , and 2,4-D amine. They took samples from soils, fresh maize stems and seeds, and river sediments near where chimpanzees reside between 2014 and 2016 and discovered mean pesticide levels were above recommended limits. They also found the pesticides imidacloprid and DDT, as well as its metabolite pp’ -DDE. And it appears these pesticides may be affecting the animals. Out of 66 chimpanzees monitored, 16 had deformities. The scientists also photographed 35 baboons, and at least six had severe nasal deformities. The researchers said in the abstract of their paper they think “excessive pesticide use…may contribute to facial dysplasia in chimpanzees and baboons.” The suggestion that our agricultural practices are physically altering animals is horrifying; the researchers noted the International Union for the Conservation of Nature lists chimpanzees as endangered . The animals are also of economic importance in Uganda as they draw in ecotourists. The researchers said it may be a conservation priority to minimize threats to their survival, as the use of pesticides may be. The journal Science of The Total Environment published the research online earlier this year. Scientists from institutions in France, Uganda, Canada, and the United States collaborated on the work. Via ScienceDirect Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Facial deformities in Uganda apes linked to pesticide use

Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

August 3, 2017 by  
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An anonymous official revealed two weeks ago that Trump intends to decimate the “crown jewel” of the national refuge system in order to build his border wall. Now, the Department of Homeland Security has announced it would disregard dozens of environmental rules in order to rush construction, which could start as soon as January. Workers have already been on site to prepare for building. The government is allowed to waive environmental requirements in order to build infrastructure, including skirting the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act. In order to avoid dealing with private land owners, Trump’s wall is slated to start in the Santa Ana refuge, and while building in any refuge would be awful for the environment, the Sant Ana refuge is particularly devastating because it is home to the endangered ocelot, jaguar and jaguarondi. It is also one of the most cherished bird refuges in the US. “The lower Rio Grande is a national treasure for birds,” said Michael J. Parr, President of American Bird Conservancy . Related: “Crown jewel” wildlife refuge to be decimated as Trump starts building border wall Funding for the wall has already been approved by the House and now it is heading to the Senate for approval. It includes a provision for rebuilding the wall in San Diego, which was built just a decade ago. “Replacing the San Diego border wall only a decade after it was built shows that the border wall has always been stupid, ineffective and incredibly expensive,” Brian Segee, attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity said. “Trump’s border wall would compound this travesty by dividing and destroying more communities, wildlife and wild places.” Meanwhile, one of the most incredible bird watching refuges in the US stands to be split in half by the wall unless the Senate is convinced to kill funding. Via Grist Images via Flickr , Wikimedia and Wikimedia

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Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

Cecil the lion’s son shot and killed by trophy hunter

July 20, 2017 by  
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In 2015, Cecil the lion was reportedly lured out of Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park to be slaughtered by American dentist Walter Palmer. But lion hunting in the area hasn’t stopped. A group that calls themselves Lions of Hwange National Park recently said Cecil’s son, Xanda, was shot on a trophy hunt . Xanda was just over six years old and was the father of multiple cubs. Lions of Hwange National Park said Xanda was shot a few days ago. Professional hunter Richard Cooke of RC Safaris was part of the shoot, and Lions of Hwange National Park said Cooke killed Xanda’s brother around two years ago, when the brother around four years old. Related: U.S. dentist will not be prosecuted in Zimbabwe for killing Cecil the lion Cooke’s hunt was legal, according to researcher Andrew Loveridge of Oxford University , who is part of a team that monitored the national park’s lions with electronic collars. Cooke apparently returned the collar, cluing researchers in to Xanda’s demise. Loveridge told The Telegraph, “I fitted it last October. It was monitored almost daily and we were aware that Xanda and his pride was spending a lot of time out of the park in the last six months, but there is not much we can do about that. Richard Cooke is one of the ‘good’ guys. He is ethical and he returned the collar and communicated what had happened. His hunt was legal and Xanda was over six years old so it is all within the stipulated regulations.” He said he hopes for a five kilometer, or 3.1 mile, exclusion zone around the park so collared lions that wander out won’t be shot by hunters anymore. The Telegraph reported Cooke did not answer his phones the day they published their article. It’s unclear who his client was, although the publication said most lion shooters hail from the United States, United Kingdom, South Africa, or Germany. The client could have forked over around £40,000, or close to $52,000 for the hunt and the lion’s head for mounting where they live. Via Lions of Hwange National Park and The Telegraph Images via Bert Duplessis/Lions of Hwange National Park on Facebook

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Cecil the lion’s son shot and killed by trophy hunter

INTERVIEW: Dr. Tamsin Woolley-Barker on how biomimicry can improve happiness and creativity in the workplace

July 12, 2017 by  
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If you’ve ever admired the work ethic of an art colony and wished you could apply those principles to your company, you’ll do well to check out Dr. Tamsin Woolley-Barker’s newest book. In ‘TEEMING: How Superorganisms Work to Build Infinite Wealth in a Finite World,’ Dr. Woolley-Barker describes the many ways companies can learn from animal societies, as well as sensible ways to to apply those principles. A combination of sociobiology, biomimicry , and organizational theory, this book is a practical yet entertaining guide on how to make organizations of all scales thrive – in a sustainable way. Read on for our interview with Dr. Woolley-Barker – and enter our raffle below for a chance to win one of 25 copies of TEEMING: How Superorganisms Work to Build Infinite Wealth in a Finite World ! a Rafflecopter giveaway Inhabitat: Can you talk about your background and what inspired you to write this book? Woolley-Barker: When I started writing it, I was really struggling––there was never enough time, enough money, enough hope. I’d lost a daughter, a husband, a business, my self-respect, my career, and I had three little boys to care for on my own. Some friends of mine got me to try one of those 21-day meditation series. It’s not typically my kind of thing, but I figured I might as well. The first day began with this goofy mantra– “I come from a place of infinite abundance” or something like that. But then the guide talked about sunlight and cosmic stardust streaming down. As a botanist, that clicked for me. Sunlight is the source of most of the value on Earth––plants use it to create sugar, and every animal lives on plants or other animals that do. At the end of the meditation, I thought––“I’m going to write a book about this. Infinite abundance is real” and immediately started writing. I scribbled 50 pages longhand on the spot, and TEEMING was born. The second day made no sense to me at all, and I quit the program, but I kept on writing. I’ve been into biology my whole life, and that’s one of the themes of the book––if you follow your childhood passions, you can do what you love for a lifetime. I studied Botany as an undergrad, backpacked the Hawaiian backcountry, the California redwoods and mountains and deserts. Bob Trivers, who kind of invented Sociobiology––the science of social evolution––was one of my first mentors, and I instantly knew that was what I wanted to study. I got my PhD in Biological Anthropology at NYU, studying baboons in Ethiopia. I was into the relationship between behavior, social structure, and evolutionary change in primates––our relatives. Then my career took a major detour. 12 years, 3 kids, some medical and economic trauma and one divorce later, I found myself trying to get back in the workforce. That’s not easy to do––science doesn’t wait around for you. I was obsolete. Somehow I managed to get work as a corporate facilitator, doing sustainability and executive coaching, and I was always fascinated in the biological anthropology of innovation, organization, cooperation, leadership, and sustainability. Once a geek, always a geek! One day, I was driving down the freeway and a piece played on the radio about something called biomimicry—innovation inspired by nature. I had a full religious epiphany. That was it. I read everything I could, networked with anyone who seemed vaguely connected, and helped out with the San Diego Zoo’s foray into the subject. I started writing a blog, BioInspired Ink. I did an incredible biomimicry workshop in Mexico, got certified as a biomimicry professional through Biomimicry 3.8, and was among those earning the first Masters degree in Biomimicry from Arizona State University’s Biomimicry Center, where I’m now an adjunct. Today I mostly work as a Biomimicry Consultant, helping companies develop biologically-inspired solutions. We look for deep patterns––strategies that stand the test of time––and help translate them into workable solutions in everything from material science to automotive design, packaging, cosmetics, medical devices, business models, algorithms, cybersecurity—and everything else. If you can ask ”how would nature do it?” I can probably find some surprising innovations for you to play with. Inhabitat: A major focus of your book is “superorganisms.” What is a superorganism? Woolley-Barker: Superorganisms are colonies of genetically distinct individuals that work together as one creature––like ants or honeybees. Different workers specialize in different tasks, the same way our skin cells and neurons do. Every colony has a dedicated caste of reproductives, and the rest support them in that. No individual can survive and thrive alone, but together, the colony does all kinds of complex tasks––like building, farming, hunting, fighting, or gathering. All of them are aligned around future success for the colony as a whole. Basically, if it takes a village, it’s a superorganism. Humans are superorganisms too. We all have different jobs and personalities, and contribute to society whether we’re reproductive or not, and we can’t survive on our own. I mean, if you go all the way back to growing the beans, how many people did it take to get your latté this morning? Or the clothes on your back? As a primatologist, I think of humans as “ant-like apes”––with little iPhone antennae. Inhabitat: What are some surprising or favorite discoveries you’ve made about the animal kingdom in your research for TEEMING? Woolley-Barker: Nature is crazy. Set it loose and check on it in 4 billion years, and you’ll find 30 million or more unbelievable designs. You’ll never get bored studying it, that’s for sure. I mean, platypus? Go home evolution, you’re drunk. Octopuses blow my mind. They are about as smart as baboons, but they have little brains about the size of a lizard’s. The rest of their neurons are in their skin, along with photoreceptors like the ones in our eyes. Basically, they are inside-out brains covered in cameras. They can even pass a Mirror Self-Recognition Test, which is the test biologists use for sentience. They let the animal get to know itself in the mirror, then anaesthetize it and put a dot of paint on its forehead (or genitals for dolphins, because they’re into that). Most animals get aggressive when they wake up thinking they are looking at a competitor. But some do something totally different: chimps pick their noses in the mirror, dolphins check out their privates, and elephants and magpies try to wipe off the dot. Octopuses feel their forehead. Picture that for a second and try not to laugh. The most mind-blowing thing is the fungal networks underground. They are like a subterranean brain, sensing our footfalls and everything that goes on nearby. Nearly all the plants on Earth depend on them to gather water and fertilizer, move sugar from parent trees to shaded seedlings, and to deliver chemical alarms when insects attack. Scientists have found that the fungi will move specific nutrients long distances to feed one particular tree while ignoring others around it. These guys are literally farming our world. Maybe they see us as irritating pests, who knows? Inhabitat: What’s a common mistake or challenge that modern companies face that’s addressed in your book? Woolley-Barker: Darwin has been paraphrased saying it’s not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change. That’s true for companies as well, and yet we design them like machines, filled with standardized, rigid cogs. Thinking happens at the top, doing at the bottom. Departments and jobs are fixed and static, and management has to penetrate many layers to tell the front lines what to do––and then the front line information has to filter all the way back up to the brain. We’ve designed all the adaptability right out of our organizations. Living things aren’t like this––life organizes as it goes, sensing and responding to change in the moment. Of course, most living things don’t work together that much, as they are just out to maximize their own reproductive fitness (though that usually requires cooperation because everything is connected). They don’t have much in the way of specific goals either. We can’t work this way because it‘s too slow and random. Companies would go broke. But ancient superorganisms societies have worked together on complex, specific goals for 500 million years. They know how to find the sweet spot between bottom-up chaos and top-down control to compound their wealth from one generation to the next. They know what works. We don’t have to reinvent the wheel here. How do they do it? For one thing, they don’t rely on hierarchies to adapt. Hierarchies in nature are used to prevent change. A hierarchical system of cells stops cancer cells from proliferating in our bodies, and separates signals from noise in our brains. Hierarchies are important—but they aren’t the right structures for adapting to change. As hierarchies grow, the costs of management rise, along with the risk of error. Decisions get bigger as you move up the chain of command, and the number of people making them gets smaller. The most powerful managers are those furthest from the frontlines—and they are overwhelmed with meetings because all the report lines converge. Vertical just doesn’t scale. It’s a recipe for instability, and you have to constantly restructure and issue more top-down directives to keep things standardized. We call it quality control and Standard Operating Procedures, but they prevent each of us from taking effective action in our sphere of influence. We feel powerless, and disengaged––70 percent of workers don’t really care about or even like the work they do. We live for the weekend. We all know we could do things better if we had the decision-making authority to do it. What a miserable waste of our creativity and intelligence. Superorganisms have a lot of unexpected lessons to teach us about leadership as well. Every ant and honeybee team has a “leader,” but they don’t give orders. There is no single leader either—one-third of all ants act as leaders. Their role is to gather information and distill it into patterns, which they spread among and across teams. They provide the social glue that knits bottom-up local information into a global vision. They also nurture the colony two most important assets––diversity and independence. Without those two things, the colony can’t access collective intelligence or swarm creativity, which are essential to nimbly responding to changing conditions. Without them, the colony will go extinct. Inhabitat: Do you have a favorite biomimicry principle for improving happiness and creativity in companies? Woolley-Barker: Other superorganisms build their compounding wealth with infinite things—sunlight and carbon, diffuse specks of water and nutrients, complexity, diversity, connection, and trust. Their teams grow from the edges out, in modular, self-managed units that seek and respond to opportunity and risk on the front lines, and they leverage symbiotic partnerships to unlock value. They focus on their shared purpose, build with infinite stuff, and spill the value they create out into the larger ecosystems they inhabit, feeding the life that feeds them. That’s regeneration––my favorite principle. As for individual happiness and creativity, superorganisms have a great recipe for it. They self-organize, and every individual simply does whatever it thinks is best at that time. The thing that keeps the system working is shared purpose, mechanisms of trust and mutual accountability, an ethos of sharing and fairness, diversity and personal independence, transparent information flows, and careful distributed prevention of the parasites who are always trying to deceive and steal from them. No meetings, targets, bosses, or performance reviews. Inhabitat: Your book is aimed at companies, but do you think the lessons from TEEMING could be applicable elsewhere? Woolley-Barker: Absolutely! TEEMING isn’t just a new way to do business. I think of it as a new way to organize our entire global society as we adapt to a finite Earth. Networks are built from the bottom up, one person at a time––individual hearts and minds have to connect to one another to make this kind of change. So it’s useful on every level, every time we interact with each other. Really, it’s an old story, and one that only a superorganism would tell––Stone Soup! You probably remember it. A hungry stranger enters a starving village, and knocks on doors to beg for a meal. The people hide in their homes, miserable behind their closed doors–– no one will share. Finally, the stranger makes a fire in the town square, takes a pot from his pack, pulls some water from the well, and puts it on to boil. Then he adds a simple stone. A few curious children come out to see what he’s doing. “I’m making Stone Soup,” he says. “You’re welcome to join me. But it needs a little something.” They bring little things—an old potato, a shriveled carrot—and their parents come too. Soon, a delicious aroma fills the air, and everyone can smell the soup. All who shared eat, everyone who trusted is full. That’s how superorganisms thrive in landscapes of scarcity that exclude other species. They pool tiny scraps of value that aren’t worth the effort for other creatures, like splinters of wood, bits of chopped up leaves, specks of pollen, and molecules of water and fertilizer. We’re superorganisms too, and it feels natural to us. It’s the way we work best. Inhabitat: Do you have another sociobiology topic you’re itching to write about? Woolley-Barker: I’m fascinated by parasites, which all superorganisms are plagued by, because a colony offers a juicy collective target, and because the colony relies on trust. Parasites try to penetrate superorganism networks through deception and mimicry. For instance, there’s a spider that mimics the scent of ant larva. When an ant comes across it, it picks up the spider and takes it down to the larval chambers, where it devours the young. Other ants practice slavery—another kind of parasitism. They raid the colonies of closely related species, and steal their eggs, putting them to work for themselves. Some species can’t even eat without these slaves. Parasites are everywhere, trying to get in, but superorganism societies have been evolving protection and detection mechanisms for hundreds of millions of years. We have a lot to learn in this department––our social media networks are pretty much wide open to predators right now, and we readily spread fake news to serve others at our expense. The same is true for cybersecurity and airport screening. The answers are already out there. + TEEMING: How Superorganisms Work to Build Infinite Wealth in a Finite World Images of leafcutter ant , elephants , octopus , people at work , bees , and parasite via Depositphotos

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INTERVIEW: Dr. Tamsin Woolley-Barker on how biomimicry can improve happiness and creativity in the workplace

The sixth mass extinction is killing off wildlife 100 times faster than normal

July 11, 2017 by  
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For years, scientists have warned that Earth is entering it sixth mass extinction — an era in which three-quarters of all species die off within only a few centuries. However terrifying this notion may be, nothing compares to a recent finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which paints a full picture of “biological annihilation.” According to the study, which was conducted by Gerardo Ceballos, an ecology professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, hundreds of species are disappearing at a faster-than-expected rate. And, believe it or not, even humans are at-risk. The researchers wrote that numerous species around the world are experiencing an “extremely high degree of population decay.” Findings from the study support this. For instance, nearly one-third of the 27,600 land-based mammals, bird, amphibian and reptile species are shrinking in terms of territorial range and their numbers. After looking at a well-documented group of 177 mammal species, the researchers also determined that all had their territories reduced by at least 30 percent between the years of 1900 and 2015. Furthermore, more than 40 percent of the species lost at least 80 percent of their geographic range during this time. As a result of these findings, the study authors wrote that “Earth’s sixth mass extinction is more severe” than previously believed. Additionally, the major event is “ongoing.” Scientists have already established that 50 percent of the Earth’s wildlife has been wiped out in the last 40 years alone, but no one really comprehended the extent to which the numbers have declined. According to Anthony Barnosky, executive director of the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve at Stanford University, this is because conservationists and researchers are “not constantly counting numbers of individuals.” He added, “it doesn’t take complicated math to figure out that, if we keep cutting by half every 40 years, pretty soon there’s going to be nothing left.” Related: Vanishing land snails signal the 6th mass extinction is happening now Perhaps the most terrifying discovery is that species are going extinct at roughly 100 times the rate which could be considered normal. In fact, within twenty years, the African elephant may go extinct. Barn swallows, giraffes , rhinos, pangolins, and jaguars, as well, may only be preserved in zoos if their populations continue to decline. With 37 percent of the Earth’s land surface now farmland or pasture (according to the World Bank), and humans utilizing polluting resources at a faster rate than they can be replenished, the whole world is in jeopardy unless sustainable initiatives are introduced and implemented. Fortunately, there’s still time, according to Ceballos. He wrote, “The good news is, we still have time. These results show it is time to act. The window of opportunity is small, but we can still do something to save species and populations.” + PNAS Via CNN Images via Pixabay

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The sixth mass extinction is killing off wildlife 100 times faster than normal

Living green bridge keeps wildlife safe from a busy highway

June 28, 2017 by  
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This stunning green bridge creates a natural connection between two mountain peaks near Seoul in Korea . Blending seamlessly into its surroundings, the bridge provides safe passage for wild animals and references the traditional Korean garden pavilion. The sides of the undulating structure simulate an organic mountainside path, while the center provides a more linear experience for humans. The bridge acts as an extension of two existing mountain slopes separated by a busy highway. It is positioned at an optimal altitude in order to create a safe separation for traffic and wildlife. Related: Living Growing Root Bridges Are 100% Natural Architecture The architectural language of the structure reminds of the rhythmic nature of the traditional Korean garden pavilions which were used as a way of establishing a stronger connection with nature. The central core of the bridge forms a straight path for humans, while the suspended segments on its sides create a gently undulating slope used by animals. Offering an experience similar to that of walking on a side of a mountain, the gradually opens up toward expansive vistas of Seoul and the north. The structure, designed by team KILD –architects Ivane Ksnelashvili , Petras Išora and Ona Lozuraityt? – received first prize at the Yang Jagogae Eco-Bridge Design Competition. + Ivane Ksnelashvili + Petras Išora + Ona Lozuraityt?

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Living green bridge keeps wildlife safe from a busy highway

Biodegradable PawPods: a better way to bury your pet

June 26, 2017 by  
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Burying a beloved pet is never easy. But PawPods offers a thoughtful, biodegradable option for burying deceased animals with their bamboo and rice husk pods. Similar to eco burials for humans, PawPods allow pets to return to the earth with dignity. PawPods CEO Ben Riggan had a terrible experience after he had to put down a cherished dog. His pet was given back to him in what he called a glorified plastic bag, and Riggan said the experience bothered him and he couldn’t let go of it. He was determined to create an alternative so others wouldn’t have to experience what he did. On his website he said, “I decided to create a company to provide a better way for pets to come home, whether they will be buried or cremated.” Related: Space Burial Service Will Launch Your Pet’s Remains into Outer Space The result was PawPods. These pet caskets are made of bamboo powder, corn starch, and rice husks, and will fully break down in three to five years. They’re sturdy – Riggan said he didn’t want to offer flimsy paper caskets like others on the market. PawPods are also designed to be painted and decorated so families can grieve through art, and have a therapeutic experience as they say goodbye. PawPods offers several different sizes, from a $9.99 fish pod to a $149.99 large pod designed for medium dogs or large cats . The products have a seeded wildflower leaf on them so a pet grave can be adorned with color in the spring. They also come with a sympathy card. The company also offers two $39.99 urns – a heart-shaped one and traditional one. The urns are designed to hold ashes and will biodegrade as the pods do or can be displayed. These come with a seeded sympathy card that can be buried in place of an urn if the family wishes. + PawPods Via TreeHugger Images via PawPods Facebook

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Biodegradable PawPods: a better way to bury your pet

Brilliant woodland pavilion pushes the envelope of timber in tension

June 26, 2017 by  
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Architectural Association students of the Design & Make program are pushing the envelope on lightweight timber construction. In the program’s most recent annual project, students completed the Sawmill Shelter, an experimental pavilion that uses tension to hold the structure together and create a sturdy roof resistant to snow loads and wind uplifts. Located in Hooke Park of Dorset, England, the sculptural structure’s roof was built from locally sourced Western Red Cedar. The Sawmill Shelter was designed and built by students En-Kai Kuo, Evgenia Spyridonos, Eleni McKirahan, Rolando Madrigal, Trianzani Sulshi, Paolo Salvetti, and Diego Saenz Penagos. In addition to serving as the 2016-2017 Design + Make project, the experimental pavilion is also a prototype for structural systems planned for the new campus lecture hall and library. The structure was built atop an existing 50-square-meter concrete slab on which the campus sawmill is placed. The students built the Sawmill Shelter using 38-by-38-millimeter laths of Western Red Cedar sourced from Hooke Park and assembled from shorter sections held together with glued finger-jointed scarfed splices. “The structure adjusted, each lath carries up to two tonnes of tension, demonstrating the remarkable strength of wood under tension,” reads the project description. The laths were tensioned to create a “stiff net of wood” clad in CNC-milled aluminum panels for a striking and lightweight anticlastic timber net roof spanning nearly 11 meters. Related: Super-local energy-efficient Caretaker’s House is built from locally grown and felled timber Student En-Kai Kuo also helped lead the large-scale steam bending of whole tree to create unusual structural columns. Eighteen bent trees, made of Douglas fir and larch, support one end of the Sawmill Shelter. + Design + Make Via Dezeen Images by Valerie Bennet, Evgenia Spyridonos and Kevin Kim

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Brilliant woodland pavilion pushes the envelope of timber in tension

132-year-old lobster returned to ocean after living in tank for 20 years

June 22, 2017 by  
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Did you know it’s National Lobster Month? Residents in Hempstead, New York are celebrating the occasion by releasing a captive lobster back into the ocean . Louie the Lobster is 132 years old, but he has spent the last couple of decades living at Peter’s Clam Bar in Long Island . Louie, who could’ve fetched a fair sum at 22 pounds, will get to live out the rest of his life in the wild. Louie lived in a tank at Peter’s Clam Bar for around 20 years. Owner Butch Yamali obtained the lobster when he bought the restaurant four years ago. He says a customer recently tried to purchase Louie for $1,000 for a Father’s Day dinner, but Yamali couldn’t take the money, saying Louie has become like a pet to him. Related: 95-year-old lobster saved from the supermarket gets to live out his days in an aquarium And apparently he’s happy to see Louie find a new home in the sea. Hempstead held a pardoning ceremony for the lobster as he was lowered into his new home in the Atlantic Ocean . In a ceremony for Louie, Hempstead Town Supervisor Anthony Santino said, “Today I’m announcing an official pardon for Louie the Lobster. Louie may have faced a buttery fate on a seafood lover’s plate, but today we are here to return Louie to a life that is better down where it’s wetter.” While sending animals to the wild from captivity right away isn’t always the best idea, Louie did live in the ocean for over 100 years before he was caught. Lobster Institute executive director Robert Bayer said, “He’ll be just fine. There aren’t many predators who want to eat a big old lobster like that. Hopefully, he finds a mate – and lives happily ever after.” Around a year ago Larry, another incredibly old lobster who’d been living at Peter’s Clam Bar, also found a new home in the ocean. Via TreeHugger and Fox 5 New York Images via Peter’s Clam Bar Facebook

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132-year-old lobster returned to ocean after living in tank for 20 years

7 eco-friendly and conservation-minded safari lodges across Africa

June 14, 2017 by  
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Gallivanting across Africa in search of majestic and fascinating wild animals is at the top of many people’s bucket lists, and thankfully, there are more ways than ever to safari with an eco-friendly and socially conscious mindset. We found seven safari lodges that were created with heavy consideration for conservation and community: the only heavy footprint left is that of a gentle, gigantic elephant as he passes by. Chem Chem Safari Lodge This Tanzanian lodge , located within the Burunge Wildlife Management Area, prides itself on a “slow safari” ethos, with options including wilderness picnics, walking safaris with a private guide, and lessons in identifying wildlife tracks, as well as meetings with the lodge’s anti-poaching team . The tent-style suites and main house toe the line between rustic and glamorous and were crafted to bring to mind vintage safari lodges. A pool, spa , gourmet restaurant, and viewing tower make returning after a day of flamingo watching and safari-going a little easier. Greystoke Mahale Operated by Nomad Tanzania , one of East Africa’s original safari companies, Greystoke Mahale will make visitors feel as if they have ventured to a magical place where beaches, forests, and mountains exist in harmony. The native chimps are the main attraction here, but with the beach of Lake Tanganyika at your feet and Mahale Mountains behind you, it’s an ideal location for exploring waterfalls, swimming, and having kayaking adventures. Image © Exploring Tourism Zimbabwe Pamushana Lodge Pamushana Lodge , part of the conservation-focused Singita resorts family, has won multiple Leading Safari Lodge awards, and this Zimbabwe retreat gives back in a major way. As the ecotourism arm for a 130,000-acre reserve, Singita manages the lodge on behalf of an environmental trust: all proceeds from the lodge benefit conservation and community partnership efforts. The local culture is honored in small ways, such as the beaded and adorned throw pillows , as well are more dramatic ways, including the preservation of a diversity of habitats from grasslands to broad-leaf forests. Related|Solar-powered safari lodge is a gorgeous green retreat in Botswana Grootbos Private Nature Reserve Not that you could ever get tired of seeing the usual suspects (giraffes, elephants, rhinos, lions, etc.) in real life, but the Grootbos Nature Reserve in South Africa offers alternate experiences including a marine safari to see the marine Big 5, a botanical 4 x 4 tour, or shark cage diving. The land is home to 791 plant species , including 100 endangered plant species, and milkwood forests that are over 1000 years old. Duba Plains Part of the Great Plains Conservation Camps, Duba Plains opened in March 2017, but it is already gaining a following for both its conservation and environmental stewardship as well as its proximity to plentiful wildlife (lions and buffalo are common sights). The rooms at the camp, located in Botswana ’s Okavango Delta, were built on recycled railway sleeper decking to provide prime and varied animal viewing access. Campi Ya Kanzi The only safari lodge on a 283,000 Maasai -owned reserve, Camp Ya Kanzi (aka Camp of the Hidden Treasure) shouldn’t remain hidden to you or your fellow safari adventurers: the expansive view of Kilimanjaro is reason enough to plan your visit. Stay in a tented cottage or tented suites or rent an entire private villa with a swimming pool supplied by rainwater . Image © SteppesTravel UK Camp Nomade Camp Nomade , located in Zakouma National Park in Chad , is exclusive in more ways than one: it’s only available from mid-December to mid-April each year when the park dries up, and can only host a maximum of eight visitors per week. With 360-degree views and the feeling of being plopped down in the middle of all the safari action, lucky visitors can look for buffalo, elephants , lions, leopards, baboons, and more. Lead image via Camp Nomade

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7 eco-friendly and conservation-minded safari lodges across Africa

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