Surprise wasps and bacterium complicate butterfly study

September 15, 2021 by  
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The introduction of new species to other territories could have unforeseen consequences. According to a study published in  Molecular Ecology , introducing new species to an area could bring along other organisms and pathogens. One such case dates back three decades when caterpillars of the Glanville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) butterfly were introduced to the tiny island of Sottunga in the Åland archipelago. Scientists hoped that introducing the butterflies would foster an understanding of how they spread. What the scientists did not realize is that they were introducing at least three other species. Related: Season’s first ‘murder hornet’ nest destroyed in Washington It was later discovered that some of the caterpillars contained a parasitic wasp known as Hyposoter horticola. This wasp usually hides inside the caterpillar and bursts out before it can become a butterfly. But that’s not all. Inside the wasps were tinier, rarer “hyperparasitoid” wasps, known as Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. The hyperparasitoid wasps kill the original wasps shortly after the wasps kill the caterpillar. The study’s lead author, Dr. Anne Duplouy of the University of Helsinki, says that scientists must learn more about species before introducing them to new territories. “The reintroduction of endangered species comes from the heart, a good place, but we have a lot to learn about the species we are reintroducing and the habitat where we want to reintroduce them before we do so,” said Duplouy. One additional visitor, the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, came along with the wasps. Despite these surprising developments, each species continues to survive on the island. Since the butterflies were introduced along with the accidental parasites , they have spread further to other islands. The wasps are parasites and have consequently affected the other species of butterflies that existed on these islands. According to Duplouy, when such species are introduced, they crash over time and may not last long. However, with the Glanville fritillary, the case has been different.  “The Glanville fritillary population has had amazing crashes at times over the last 30 years and we were expecting there to be very low genetic diversity in the years following those crashes,” Duplouy said. “But this butterfly somehow seems to recover from isolated population crashes, and the genetic diversity in Åland is still impressively high, despite all the bottlenecks the butterfly has been through,” she added. These results could serve as a warning for future studies exploring the possibility of introducing new species. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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Surprise wasps and bacterium complicate butterfly study

Potty-trained cows: A new approach to reduce emissions

September 14, 2021 by  
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In a recent study, scientists “potty-trained” cows in an attempt to reduce the animals’ greenhouse gas emissions. The study, published in  Current Biology , included 16 calves trained to defecate in one spot. After several weeks of training, 11 out of 16 calves successfully learned to use the spot. Researchers suggested the calves that didn’t pick up the habit may just need more training to master the process.  These efforts are an attempt to reduce agriculture-based emissions . Currently, farming is the largest source of ammonium pollution, with livestock farming contributing over 50% of the waste. While ammonia from cow urine itself does not contribute to greenhouse gases, when it leaches in the soil, it is converted into nitrous oxide. This oxide is the third most prevalent greenhouse gas after methane and carbon dioxide. Related: Organic and conventional meat production cause equal amounts of emissions Researchers say that if all cattle could be trained to defecate in designated areas, treating the urine could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions by over half. There haven’t been significant attempts to train cows like this before, so the recent attempt helps gauge whether cows can learn and hold on to the training for a meaningful amount of time. The calves were trained using a system known as MooLoo, which directed them to defecate in a designated area in their barn . This was achieved by rewarding those that urinated in the right place and gently punishing those that did not. Jan Langbein, an animal psychologist at the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in Germany, said cows can be trained much like dogs and other animals . “Cattle, like many other animals, are quite clever and they can learn a lot,” said Langbein “Why shouldn’t they be able to learn how to use a toilet?” The team is now working on creating a system that automates cattle potty training. They say that the system should be able to help train calves with minimal intervention from the farmers . “We want to develop some kind of sensor technology which is all-inclusive,” said Langbein. “In a few years all cows will go to a toilet.” Via The Guardian Lead image via Pexels

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Potty-trained cows: A new approach to reduce emissions

20 livestock firms emit more greenhouse gas than Britain, France or Germany

September 8, 2021 by  
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What produces 14.5% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide? The animal agriculture sector. According to a new report by animal campaigners, 20 livestock companies contribute more emissions than Britain, France or Germany. And  governments  subsidize them to do so. About 2,500 banks, pension funds and investment firms financed global meat and dairy companies to the tune of $478 billion between 2015 and 2020, according to the  Meat Atlas . And the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development predicts meat production will rise by another 40 million tons a year by 2029. China, Brazil, the United States and some European Union members produce the most  meat . But lower-income developing countries are trying to get their piece of the shepherd’s pie. Poultry is growing especially fast, with experts predicting that it will account for 41% of all meat protein globally by 2030. Related: Air pollution from US meat production causes 16,000 deaths annually Food and agriculture campaigner Stanka Becheva, who works with Friends of the Earth, said, “we need to begin reducing the number of food animals on the planet and incentivise different consumption models,” as reported in The Guardian. Meat industry regulations need to be beefed up, too, “to make sure companies are paying for the harms they have created throughout the supply chain and to minimise further damage.” Banks and investors financing large, intensive projects to produce more animal  protein  also pose a problem. Paolo Patruno, deputy secretary general of the European Association for the Meat Processing Industry, minimized having such a meaty role in emissions. “We don’t believe that any food sector is more or less  sustainable  than another. But there are more or less sustainable ways to produce plant or animal foods and we are committed to making animal protein production more sustainable,” Patruno said, according to The Guardian. “We also know that average GHG [greenhouse gas] emissions in the EU from livestock is half that of the global average. The global average is about 14% and the EU average is 7%.” Meanwhile, the National Farmers’ Union in England and  Wales  is going for net-zero emissions by 2040. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pexels

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20 livestock firms emit more greenhouse gas than Britain, France or Germany

Climate change-induced tuna migration may wreck island economies

September 2, 2021 by  
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Ocean warming may cause small states in the Pacific Islands to struggle economically due to fish loss. A recent study published in the journal   Nature Sustainability  has found that tuna caught in 10 Small Island Developing States (SIDS) will decline by an average of 20% by 2050. The study also found that all the 10 islands will be affected and may struggle economically as a result. As waters closer to the equator warm, tuna and other sea species move out in search of a favorable environment. According to Johann Bell, the lead author of the study and a senior director at  Conservation International’s Center for Oceans, fish can only live in conditions that suit their physiology. Related: Mysterious fish deaths in Mar Menor Spain prompt investigation “All fish have preferred water temperatures, i.e., temperatures that suit their physiology best and which provide optimum conditions for growth and reproduction,” Bell said. Conservation International’s Center for Oceans is a nonprofit organization that works to protect nature through science. The organization uses scientific data to show changes in nature and urge policymakers to make critical choices.  Bell explains that tuna follow other species favorable for prey. He says when the ocean warms, other species may move outward in search of cooler waters. Tuna have to follow such species, or they may fail to find food and experience stunted growth. The study looked at two key species of tuna: skipjack and yellowfin. These are the main target species for large-scale fishers in the Pacific Islands region. Researchers found that these species will progressively continue moving eastwards as the waters get warm . As a result, the species will only be available in high seas and regions outside the jurisdiction of SIDS. Most states in the Pacific Islands depend on fishing as a main economic activity. If the most popular fish species moves away from the area, locals will struggle economically.  For a long time, scientists have warned that the effects of global warming will be more economically costly than any amount invested in combating climate change. The tuna conundrum is just one example of how this issue manifests. Via EcoWatch Lead image via Pexels

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Climate change-induced tuna migration may wreck island economies

The generational divides on climate anxiety

September 2, 2021 by  
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Different generations suffer from different anxieties, and those anxieties influence economic models. While Baby Boomers worry about rising inflation draining their retirement funds while they’re still aboveground, Gen Z is terrified that  climate change  means there will soon be no safe air to breathe nor water to drink. Older Americans suffer from price growth, which is the fastest it’s been for more than a decade. In a  Bankrate.com  survey published Wednesday, three-quarters of Baby Boomers said inflation has negatively impacted their  finances . Contrast that with 54% of Millennials and Gen Zers. Related: Biden unveils $2 trillion infrastructure and green economy plan Meanwhile, 37% of Gen Z called climate change a “top concern,” according to a Pew  Research  Center study. A third of Millennials agreed, while only 29% of Baby Boomers were as worried. Gen Zers are likelier to push for a green economy, inflation be damned. In that scenario, climate-friendly ventures would be rewarded, and those contributing to global warming, penalized. A  carbon  tax and a shift toward domestic production would have environmental upsides but could add to inflation. A new mental  health  issue, eco-anxiety, may further drive the green economy. While there’s not yet an official clinical diagnosis or definition, a team of clinicians is working on it. “The symptoms of clinical anxiety are the same,” said Navjot Bhullar, a professor of psychology at the University of New England in Australia, as reported by Verywell. “There’s a sense of dread or doom and not being able to concentrate, with a physical side of heart palpitations.” Of course, Gen Z is hardly the first generation to suspect the world was about to end. People have been predicting apocalyptic disasters throughout recorded history. Ever since World War Two, people have lived in fear of atomic bombs ending life on Earth. Generations who attended school between the 1950s and 1980s may remember practicing duck and cover drills, and some suffered from a mental health condition called nuclear anxiety. The difference this time? Well, the world does seem in more peril than ever, and we see the pollution, suffering, death and devastation on social media 24/7. That’s enough to spur climate dread in any generation. The green  economy  isn’t perfect. But it might be all we have. Via Business Insider , VeryWell Lead image via Ittmust

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After 40 years, blue whales are returning to Spain

August 25, 2021 by  
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Blue whales have started returning to the coast of Spain 40 years after they vacated. The world’s largest mammals have been spotted on the coast of Galicia in northwest Spain several times since 2017. First, marine biologist Bruno Díaz spotted a blue whale in 2017, the first sighting of a blue whale in Galicia since the 1980s. In 2018, a different whale was spotted, followed by another in 2019. In 2020, two whales were spotted and identified by marine biologists as the ones from previous years. Just a week ago, a different blue whale was spotted off the Islas Cíes. Díaz says that blue whales vacated the coast of Spain due to human actions. Related: Humpback whales in Alaska thrive in absence of cruise ships “I believe the moratorium on whaling has been a key factor,” Díaz said. “In the 1970s, just before the ban was introduced, an entire generation of blue whales disappeared. Now, more than 40 years later, we’re seeing the return of the descendants of the few that survived.” Spain enjoyed one of the most robust whaling industries for over a century before the ban. Unfortunately, by the time the ban arrived in 1986, blue whales in Spain were virtually extinct . The return of the blue whale to Spain may sound like good news to many, but some experts remain skeptical. Alfredo López, a marine biologist at a Galician NGO, says the whales’ return is likely due to climate change. “I’m pessimistic because there’s a high possibility that climate change is having a major impact on the blue whale’s habitat,” López told the newspaper La Voz de Galicia. López worries that if the mammals are pushed further north of the equator due to global warming, they may run out of habitat in the future. Díaz has a different school of thought, arguing that other factors may influence blue whale migration . He notes that recent studies indicate whales migrate based on their memory of places they have been to before. He speculates that they may have remembered their ancestral home. “In recent years it’s been discovered that the blue whale’s migration is driven by memory, not by environmental conditions,” Díaz said. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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After 40 years, blue whales are returning to Spain

After 40 years, blue whales are returning to Spain

August 25, 2021 by  
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Blue whales have started returning to the coast of Spain 40 years after they vacated. The world’s largest mammals have been spotted on the coast of Galicia in northwest Spain several times since 2017. First, marine biologist Bruno Díaz spotted a blue whale in 2017, the first sighting of a blue whale in Galicia since the 1980s. In 2018, a different whale was spotted, followed by another in 2019. In 2020, two whales were spotted and identified by marine biologists as the ones from previous years. Just a week ago, a different blue whale was spotted off the Islas Cíes. Díaz says that blue whales vacated the coast of Spain due to human actions. Related: Humpback whales in Alaska thrive in absence of cruise ships “I believe the moratorium on whaling has been a key factor,” Díaz said. “In the 1970s, just before the ban was introduced, an entire generation of blue whales disappeared. Now, more than 40 years later, we’re seeing the return of the descendants of the few that survived.” Spain enjoyed one of the most robust whaling industries for over a century before the ban. Unfortunately, by the time the ban arrived in 1986, blue whales in Spain were virtually extinct . The return of the blue whale to Spain may sound like good news to many, but some experts remain skeptical. Alfredo López, a marine biologist at a Galician NGO, says the whales’ return is likely due to climate change. “I’m pessimistic because there’s a high possibility that climate change is having a major impact on the blue whale’s habitat,” López told the newspaper La Voz de Galicia. López worries that if the mammals are pushed further north of the equator due to global warming, they may run out of habitat in the future. Díaz has a different school of thought, arguing that other factors may influence blue whale migration . He notes that recent studies indicate whales migrate based on their memory of places they have been to before. He speculates that they may have remembered their ancestral home. “In recent years it’s been discovered that the blue whale’s migration is driven by memory, not by environmental conditions,” Díaz said. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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After 40 years, blue whales are returning to Spain

Great Lakes fish found to be full of microplastics

August 13, 2021 by  
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A  Great Lakes  fish set a new record, and not in a good way. The brown bullhead had 915 particles in its body. This mind-boggling fish was hauled out by researchers in 2015, but their study has just been published in  Conservation Biology . Before being yanked out of the  water  in the name of science, the bullhead was swimming at the western end of Lake Ontario in Hamilton Harbor. The 915 particles included dyed cellulose fibers, microplastics and synthetic materials containing plasticizers and flame retardants. Related: Warming in deepest parts of the Great Lakes could be irreversible “In 2015 we knew a lot less about  microplastics  and contamination in fish. I was expecting to see no particles in most fish,” said Keenan Munno, then a graduate student at the University of Toronto, as reported by EcoWatch. And while the bullhead won the trophy, all the other sampled fish also contained ingested particles. For the study, researchers gathered 212 fish from three locations in Lake Ontario, Lake Superior and the Humber River, a Lake Ontario tributary. They found a whopping total of 12,442 particles. Even little minnows, most of which don’t even measure eight inches, contained up to 68 particles. Munno searched the  fish’s  digestive tracts for particles and counted them by hand. The health problems microplastics cause in humans are still not entirely known. Researchers have connected them to cancer, neurotoxicity and immunity and metabolism disruption. Once the fish are full of microplastics, that  pollution  quickly expands its reach. Whether the fish are spread as fertilizers, served to Fluffy and Fido or turned into a fish fillet, the microplastics move beyond the aquatic ecosystem. The University of Toronto Trash Team is trying to mitigate Lake Ontario’s plastic pollution. The team installed filters on washing machines to catch microfibers before they escape from the laundry room. They’ve also put sea bins in the  lake  to capture additional microplastics. Via EcoWatch Lead image via Pixabay

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Humpback whales in Alaska thrive in absence of cruise ships

August 12, 2021 by  
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The COVID-19 pandemic has allowed humpback whales in Alaska to enjoy some peace, according to a new study. Researchers say that reduction in noise caused by cruise ships is to thank for the positive changes being witnessed in whales’ social lives.  Before the pandemic, humpback whales stuck together and expressed themselves less. According to National Park Service biologist Christine Gabriel, this behavior has changed since the dawn of the pandemic. With fewer cruise ships disturbing their habitats, the whales have been observed to spread out and communicate more expressively. Mothers have also been seen giving their young ones more freedom. Related: Human actions are causing endangered whales to shrink in size Cruise ships play a key role in Alaska’s tourism industry, but they make life harder for sea animals. The ships generate loud noise that interferes with whales’ communication and hunting. At the peak of the pandemic , cruise ships became major transmission zones, forcing government restrictions. Tourists also started avoiding cruise ships, a situation that benefited whales. According to a BBC  report , traffic to Glacier Bay in Alaska decreased by about 40%. Decreased cruise ship activities also presented the perfect opportunity for biologists to study marine life . Thanks to the lack of human activity, researchers from the University of Alaska and other institutions have been traversing the coast to observe the behavior of whales.  Jason Gedamke of NOAA fisheries’ ocean acoustics program told NPR that more has to be done to protect whales since they rely on sound for communication. “When you have animals that for millions of years have been able to communicate over vast distances in the ocean, and then once we introduce noise and have increased sound levels and they can’t communicate over those distances, clearly there’s going to be some impact there,” Gedamke said. Although the pandemic has been a nightmare for humans, animals like these whales have enjoyed some benefits. A different  study  by the University of California , Davis has shown a significant drop in the number of wild animals being hit by cars over the pandemic. Wild animals have also been seen widely roaming areas they would otherwise never venture into due to human interference. Via HuffPost Lead image via Pixabay

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In Our Nature delves into animal life from the Serengeti to US

August 11, 2021 by  
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“In Our Nature,” a new six-episode digital series, takes viewers to settings in  Tanzania  and the U.S. and features gorgeous animals and fascinating info about their lives. And you can watch it free on YouTube. Three of the hosts talked to Inhabitat about their new series — favorite moments, what they learned and why viewers should care. Joe Hanson is a biologist and the creator and host of PBS Digital Studio’s  It’s Okay to Be Smart ; Trace Dominguez is a science communicator, and the producer and host of PBS Star Gazers, Uno Dos of Trace; and Emily Graslie is a  science  communicator who worked as the Field Museum’s chief curiosity correspondent, for which she created more than 200 episodes for the natural history-themed YouTube channel The Brain Scoop. Here’s what they have to say about “ In Our Nature .” Related: Los Angeles is the largest US city to be certified as a biodiversity haven Inhabitat: How did “In Our Nature” come about, and how did you get involved? Joe Hanson: The project came about originally as a digital program alongside PBS’ broadcast series  “Life at the Waterhole”  and I was involved in developing our series from the outset. During pre-production we embraced the opportunity to create a top-quality nature  education  series designed specifically for audiences that primarily watch YouTube and other digital video platforms rather than TV or streaming services. I worked with my production team from It’s Okay to be Smart to create a format and story approach that would feel native to YouTube but allow us to present top-quality nature filmmaking at the same time. We immediately thought of Emily Graslie and Trace Dominguez as co-hosts thanks to their awesome track record making creative and high-quality educational videos.  Emily Graslie: Joe Hanson approached me about this series back in January and I was immediately hooked on the premise of looking at ecosystem  health  in such a holistic manner. And, it’s not very often a YouTube channel gets the opportunity to film an international, high-quality nature series, so being a part of this has been really special and rewarding. Trace Dominguez: “In Our Nature” came about when Joe Hanson reached out to me about working on a new kind of  nature  show. I’ve known Joe and Emily for years yet, incredibly, the three of us had never worked together! We all agreed that nature documentaries are incredible, but needed a bit of a refresh. Traditionally, documentaries try to bring attention to individual animals, or single ecosystems. They often eschew discussion of human influences or exploring the wider parallels across continents, or the delicate web of connections running across different species. I was super interested in the challenge and thanks to our group of admirable nerds I think it worked out swimmingly (pun intended). Inhabitat: What have been the most exciting parts of making this show? Hanson: Filming a nature series in the Serengeti ecosystem is as good as it gets. This was my first time in Africa , and even though I knew I would see some awesome things, I wasn’t prepared for just how MUCH awesome stuff we would see. I was simply blown away by the richness of life, at scales big and small, in this place. We also saw herds of wildebeest that stretched to the horizon and over 100 elephants in one grassy clearing. There was just so much of everything. I think it speaks to just how valuable wild places like this really are, not just for the life they contain, but also for the effect they can have on us. Graslie: Filming for  Episode 3  in the Andrews Forest in  Oregon  came with all sorts of adventures — but ascending 140 feet up a Douglas fir to examine how scientific instruments stories in the canopy can teach us about things happening on the forest floor was the most thrilling. Getting into a drysuit to snorkel in the forest’s streams to follow that cycle into the water was a close second. It was freezing!! Dominguez: The most exciting part, for me, has been working with Joe and Emily; full honesty! Plumbing the depths of the collections at the  California  Academy of Sciences is great and all (that place is an amusement park of nerdery), but this business is often pretty solitary. Getting to work with such excellent science communicators has been a privilege. Inhabitat: What about the most challenging parts? Graslie: I’ve helped coordinate plenty of filming shoots, but this was the first time doing it during a global  pandemic . Lots of decisions and potential ideas were up in the air because there was so much uncertainty around vaccinations and travel. At the same time, everyone else – our crews and filming partners – were more or less in the same boat, so we all just learned to go with the flow and support one another as best as possible. Dominguez: The most challenging part of “In Our Nature” is the hardest part of  any  science project: the execution. We can have ideas and plans to tell giant stories, but actually capturing  animals , ecosystems, and humans all together  at the same time and in the same place  is extremely challenging. Inhabitat: What’s your favorite episode and why? Hanson: It’s hard to pick just one! Our episode about  animal culture  is a real favorite. Scientists are starting to appreciate how widespread and varied  culture  is across animals. And my hope is that will change how people look at conservation. Because it’s teaching us that we aren’t only saving animals themselves, or even just the places they live. We are also preserving their ways of existing and surviving in those places. And those ways of existing are often irreplaceable if the animals were to disappear, even temporarily. Graslie: I’m really proud of the work we put into  “Are some species more important than others?”  – in part because of the partnerships we developed with the Intertribal Buffalo Council, and Oglala Lakota Parks & Recreation. The ITBC is doing critical work to reintroduce  bison  to tribal lands across the country for reasons that are environmental, cultural, and spiritual. Oglala Lakota Parks & Recreation welcomed us to participate in a sacred buffalo dance ceremony they usually only hold once a year, and later invited us to film their herd. Dominguez: I think my favorite episode might be Emily’s episode about  nutrient recycling . When you get enough bio-nerds together they will inevitably start to geek out about  whale  falls, carrion eaters, and decay. With both Joe and Emily together on this show it was inescapable that we’d see a decomposition chapter in this series too; I was riveted! So many different organisms benefit when one huge African animal kills another, or when an ancient  tree  comes crashing to the ground. The parallels between these massive herds of wildebeest and the rotting of giant ancient trees were through-lines I never would have made without help, but once they were side-by-side they were so similar! Inhabitat: I’m especially intrigued by animal culture. What were the most surprising examples you found? Hanson: This example didn’t make it into the episode, but I was really surprised to learn just how deep and significant whale culture is. It may even be influencing speciation. Groups of orcas possess culture in how and where they  hunt , as well as how they vocalize. They specialize to such a degree that they only mate within these cultural groups, which some scientists believe is or already has led to the creation of several subspecies of orcas. So culture and behavior are capable of driving evolution, which is pretty special. Dominguez: Animal culture is something I’ve spent a lot of time learning about. I studied behavioral psychology in undergrad, and find intelligence, social interaction and the culture that comes out of that fascinating (in both humans and non-humans). Ultimately, the story of white-crowned sparrows passing on their song cultures won out. Not just because of the story itself and how it affects the lives of the sparrows, but it’s also kind of a meta-cultural story on top of that. There are stories about the  researchers  carrying on Baptista’s legacy, the story of Baptista himself, and the exploration of how human noise impacts other species. Inhabitat: Tell us a couple of memorable things you learned from “In Our Nature.” Hanson: Dung beetles navigate by the  sun  and stars. They are tiny, smelly astronomers. That will never not blow my mind. Graslie: I love Trace’s story in “Are humans the only animals that have culture?” on the white-crowned sparrows in  San Francisco , especially how fast those birds changed their songs during the times when traffic noise was lessened during the COVID-19 shutdowns. I was also completely blown away by Joe’s facts in  “This is the REAL circle of life”  episode about dead wildebeest providing, like, 10 blue whales’ worth of nutrients when they die crossing the Mara River. Dominguez: One of our goals for this series was to help people see that ecosystems don’t exist in a vacuum; instead  ecosystems  across the world have parallels and even influence each other. I don’t typically cover a lot of these huge biology and environmental stories so working with Emily and Joe really opened my eyes in how to tell these stories and really emphasized their importance.  Inhabitat: Why is it important that the world knows about Serengeti animals? Hanson: This area is the cradle of humanity, and our species has been interacting with this ecosystem for tens of thousands of years. But today, humans impact the  Earth  to such a degree today that there really is no corner of the world that we haven’t changed in some way. But the Serengeti ecosystem is proof of just how rich and beautiful wild nature can be if we protect it, let it be, and minimize our impact and influence wherever possible. That’s a hefty challenge, but it’s hard to work to save what we don’t know about. That’s why we share stories like these. Dominguez: Giraffes, zebras,  lions , elephants and hyenas have been the protagonists, antagonists and everything in between in stories across the world, but even though people know these beautiful animals exist — they rarely understand the ecological nuances that they fit into. We’ve all seen incredible videos of giraffes lumbering across the savannah, but they’re rarely depicted holistically, or as a complete story of the animal. Inhabitat: What else should readers know about “In Our Nature”? Graslie :  I promise it’s some of the best science/nature content on all of  YouTube !!! Seriously, it doesn’t get any better than this. Dominguez: “In Our Nature” is one of the best projects I’ve ever worked on; I’m really proud of what we’ve done with it. Watching it will open your eyes to stories you might have missed before, and while it’s great on a phone, the footage just sings* on a giant screen. That said, no matter where you watch, you’re going to see stories you’ve never seen before! * just like the white-crowned sparrow! + In Our Nature Images by Joe Hanson, David Schulte, Emily Graslie, In Our Nature

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In Our Nature delves into animal life from the Serengeti to US

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