Steelcase takes the long road towards circularity

May 16, 2017 by  
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“Sustainability has been a good trip, but it’s going to get better,” says its Director of Global Sustainability Angela Nahikian about moving the furniture company towards a circular economy strategy. 

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Steelcase takes the long road towards circularity

From Here to Circularity

February 23, 2017 by  
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Hear from Steelcase Director of Global Sustainability Angela Nahikian and Director of Global End-of-Use Services Dan Dicks on how the company has partnered with influencers beyond the sustainability department to develop and implement its circular economy strategy.

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From Here to Circularity

John Hardy and Angela Lindvall Launch Luxury Recycled Jewelry Collection (Photos)

May 7, 2011 by  
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John Hardy Creative Director Guy Bedarida and supermodel Angela Lindvall in Bali. Photos: courtesy John Hardy Jewelry designer John Hardy is teaming up with supermodel and Alter Eco star Angela Lindvall to launch ” Hijau Dua ,” a handcrafted collection of jewelry made with recycled st… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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John Hardy and Angela Lindvall Launch Luxury Recycled Jewelry Collection (Photos)

Small Fish May Be More At Risk Than Big Ones

May 7, 2011 by  
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Sardines are tasty — but are they sustainable? Photo: Naotake Murayama / Creative Commons

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Small Fish May Be More At Risk Than Big Ones

MIT Researchers Harness Viruses to Split Water

April 12, 2010 by  
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A team of researchers at MIT has just announced that they have successfully modified a virus to split apart molecules of water, paving the way for an efficient and non-energy intensive method of producing hydrogen fuel . The team engineered a common, harmless bacterial virus to assemble the components needed to crack apart a molecule of water, yielding a fourfold boost in efficiency over similar processes

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MIT Researchers Harness Viruses to Split Water

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