Believed tomb of Jesus Christ is far older than previously thought

December 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Scientists have discovered that the tomb in which Jesus Christ is believed to have been buried after his crucifixion is significantly older than previously known. According to results given to National Geographic , archaeologists tested a sample of mortar taken from a limestone tomb beneath the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem and found the cave dates back 345 CE. Previous evidence had indicated that the cave, the oldest architectural structure on site, was built during the Crusader period, around 1000 CE. According to historical records, the tomb is thought to have been rediscovered, after a period of obscurity, by the Romans in 326 CE. This rediscovery occurred during the reign of Constantine, the Roman leader who converted the Empire to Christianity. The recent discovery was made possible by the tomb’s opening on October 26, 2016. Within the tomb, scientists were surprised to discover an older, fractured marble slab, which rested on the original limestone surface of the “burial bed,” where it is believed that Jesus’s body was placed. Some researchers suspected that this older marble may have been placed during the Crusader Period, while others believed that the slab may have been even older. Upon further testing, it was determined that the slab dated back to Constantine-era Jerusalem. In order to determine the tomb’s age, scientists analyzed chemicals found within the slab to determine how long it is has been since they were last exposed to light. It was also discovered that a significant portion of the tomb remains sealed off. Related: Pope Francis Officially Endorses Evolution and The Big Bang Theory The Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the caves below it have undergone great changes over the millennia. Following the discovery and reconstruction of the tomb in the 4th century, the Church was completely destroyed in 1099, then subsequently rebuilt. This destruction led scientists to question whether the site could ever be conclusively identified as the location, as determined by the Constantine-era Romans, of Christ’s tomb. While there is no archaeological evidence to suggest that the historical Jesus of Nazareth was buried in the tomb, the recent discoveries help to clarify the complex history surrounding Christianity’s holiest shrine. Via National Geographic Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Believed tomb of Jesus Christ is far older than previously thought

IBUKU unveils modular bamboo homes for garbage collectors in Bali

December 7, 2017 by  
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Bali-based IBUKU explores the fantastic potential of bamboo as a sustainable building material – and we’ve featured several of their beautiful buildings in the past. The team’s most recent undertaking is a series of modular bamboo homes for garbage collectors in Denpasar, the capital of Bali and the main gateway to the island. IBUKU was commissioned to develop healthy, well organized homes that would provide a means for social transformation. The project is designed for people who earn their livelihood by collecting and selling recyclable waste . Related: Ibuku founder Elora Hardy on creating incredible buildings with bamboo The project comprises 14 housing units of 193 square feet, and it also includes bathrooms, storage, kitchens and common areas to meet the needs of its inhabitants. Each house is modular, with main living spaces on the first floor and a mezzanine sleeping area above. Room for the safe storage of recycled materials was also integrated into the design. Related: Brilliant bamboo house uses ground water for natural cooling The floors and walls are made of bamboo and prevent wind from penetrating the building. Recycled bottles and tetra pack packaging was used for the roofing and insulation . The houses are meant to provide temporary shelter so that their occupants can increase their income and return to their hometowns. + IBUKU Via Archdaily

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IBUKU unveils modular bamboo homes for garbage collectors in Bali

France is the world’s most sustainable food country

December 7, 2017 by  
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Thanks to proactive measures put in place to curb food waste, France now ranks #1 in the world when it comes to food sustainability . In 2016 , the country became the first globally to require supermarkets to donate unsold food to charity, and for restaurants to provide doggy bags when requested, or be subject to fines of up to €75,000 ($82,324) and two years in jail. The  Economist Intelligence Unit graded 34 nations based on food waste, environment-friendly agriculture, and quality nutrition as part of a newly launched Food Sustainability Index . Several other European countries broke the top five, including Germany, Spain, and Sweden, while Japan ranked second. Despite being a highly developed country (high-income countries tend to rank better) the U.S. sits in a much less desirable 21st place, thanks to its over-consumption of meat, sugar, and saturated fats. Poor management of soil and fertilizer in agriculture were additional reasons it was downgraded further. Related: Study finds that cutting food waste could feed one billion hungry people Interestingly, the very wealthy United Arab Emirates ranked last. Food waste in the country is nearly 1,000 kilos (2,205 lbs) per person per annum. The UAE is experiencing an increase in obesity rates and an agriculture sector that is straining water supplies. Vytenis Andriukaitis, EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, called the waste “unethical and immoral” in a statement, especially since hundreds of millions of people go hungry each day. According to Reuters , 815 million people are afflicted by global hunger, which is more than one in 10 persons on the planet. Food waste also produces incredible amounts of greenhouse gases in landfills, making it the third largest source of emissions after China and the U.S. As Inhabitat previously reported , over 1.4 billion tons of food is thrown out across the globe each year, which the World Bank estimates to be  between one-quarter and one-third of all food produced . In France alone, 7.1 million tons were being trashed before the 2016 food waste bill was passed. Now it loses just 1.8 percent of its total food production annually, and there are plans to half that figure by 2025. Via Reuters Images via Pixbay

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France is the world’s most sustainable food country

Classic Eichler gets a tasteful renovation and expansion in the heart of Silicon Valley

December 7, 2017 by  
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Klopf Architecture has refurbished and expanded a classic Eichler home in the San Mateo highlands while keeping its mid-century modern charms intact. Working in collaboration with Outer Space Landscape Architects and Coast to Coast Construction , the updated single-family home was enlarged into a 2,285-square-foot dwelling with four bedrooms and two baths with the help of 3D modeling. Set in the heart of Silicon Valley , the Eichler renovation was commissioned by a young couple with two small children, who, as evidenced by their choice in furnishings, sought to maintain the modernist and minimalist look of their home in the upgrade. “The goals were to maintain the Eichler style while bringing in high quality, more current materials and updating what was already there,” wrote the architects. The clients also desired a new addition that would be used as an office and guest room. Using 3D modeling , the architects determined that the most suitable location for the addition would be in the side yard, rather in the rear due to set back limitations. “The addition needed to be transparent so it would not appear massive and take up the side yard,” added Klopf Architecture. Like the rest of the existing home, the addition features post-and-beam construction, Eichler profile siding, and dark bronze door frames. Related: Vintage Eichler home receives open and airy remodel that preserves its roots The bathrooms, entry, and storage were also enlarged. The interior is lined in timber paneling—some of which new to replace damaged paneling—all of which was re-stained to bring out the wood’s rich colors. The leaky steel radiant heating tubes were replaced with a new radiant floor heating system beneath concrete slabs and new flooring installed throughout the home. + Klopf Architecture Images ©2017 Mariko Reed

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Classic Eichler gets a tasteful renovation and expansion in the heart of Silicon Valley

How to keep your head during a U.S. presidential transition

December 8, 2016 by  
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Watch these four indicators, and remember four words from Ancient Rome.

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How to keep your head during a U.S. presidential transition

Why IBM sees blockchain as a breakthrough for traceability

December 8, 2016 by  
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The tech giant is behind two intriguing supply chain projects, with more to come.

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How Dow Chemical is taking on the SDGs

December 8, 2016 by  
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The chemical company formulates plans for “redefining the role of business in society.”

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How Dow Chemical is taking on the SDGs

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