Research suggests humans emerged 2.8M years ago amid major climate change event

May 18, 2017 by  
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Mystery still shrouds much of the story of our origins, but new Arizona State University (ASU) research sheds new light on why we first emerged where and when we did. Around 2.8 million years ago our genus, Homo , could have emerged in a valley in Ethiopia . It was a time of change on that Earth long ago; it appears forest landscapes altered into grassy ones where our ancient ancestors lived. Back in 2013 an ASU team discovered a jawbone with teeth at Ledi-Geraru, and the incredible find is the oldest evidence of Homo we’ve yet found and dates back around 2.8 million years. The find was 400,000 years older than other fossils we’d discovered to that point. Building on that discovery, ASU scientists hoped to answer two questions: why did humans emerge in Ethiopia’s lower Awash Valley, and why did they emerge at that point in time? Related: New ‘Hobbit’ fossils provide a glimpse into human relative Animal fossils help scientists recreate the conditions of the past – what they ate help indicate the environment in those days. Scientists discovered that the animals found with the 2.8 million-year-old Homo fed on grass, seeming to support the guesses of many in the scientific community humanity emerged as grassy environments were spreading in a period of global cooling. According to IBTimes UK, the landscape in which early humans lived would have been similar to today’s Serengeti region. Scientist Joshua Robinson said evidence had hinted at the connection between the emergence of humans and the spread of those grassy, open environments, “but, until now, we had not direct environmental data for the origins of Homo now that it’s been pushed back in time.” The 2.8 million date is also incredibly important for the fossil record. The famous Lucy fossil ( Australopithecus ), which dates to around 3.2 million years ago, was found just around 18 miles west of ASU’s 2013 discovery. But the geological sequence ended around 2.95 million years ago, until the recent findings. ASU researcher John Rowan said although Lucy’s species endured many environmental changes, it appears they didn’t last through the ancient climate change as open environments spread. The diet of early humans was still very similar to what Lucy would have consumed, however. The ASU research was published online this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution . Four ASU scientists worked on the study with one geoscientist from the University of South Florida . Via Arizona State University and IBTimes UK Images via Kaye Reed/Phys.org and Josh Robinson/Arizona State University

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Research suggests humans emerged 2.8M years ago amid major climate change event

Researchers discover 14,000-year-old Canadian village, one of North America’s oldest

April 13, 2017 by  
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The discovery of a 14,000-year-old ancient village in Canada could forever alter our understanding of early civilization in North America. Researchers estimate the settlement is way older than the Giza pyramids, and have found artifacts dating all the way back to the Ice Age . The village is one of the oldest human settlements we’ve ever uncovered in North America – and lines up with the oral history of the Heiltsuk Nation. Researchers from the Hakai Institute and University of Victoria , with local First Nations members, unearthed revealing artifacts on Triquet Island, around 310 miles northwest of Victoria, Canada. They’ve found fish hooks, spears, and tools to ignite fires. Thanks to the discovery of the ancient village last year, researchers now think a massive human migration may have happened along British Columbia’s coastline. Related: World’s oldest fossils discovered in Canada – and they’re 4 billion years old According to IFL Science, archaeologists once thought humans might arrived in North America via a land bridge between Russia and Alaska, and then moved forward on foot. But the recent discovery suggests people moved down the coast possibly in boats instead; the coastal route likely came before the inland route. University of Victoria PhD student Alisha Gauvreau, who was part of the excavation, told CTV News Vancouver Island, “I remember when we get [sic] the dates back and we just kind of sat there going, holy moly, this is old. What this is doing is just changing our idea of the way in which North America was first peopled.” The find fits right in with the oral history of a First Nations government in British Columbia, the Heiltsuk Nation. For generations they’ve told stories of ancient coastal villages. William Housty of Heiltsuk Nation told CTV News Vancouver Island, “To think about how these stories survived all of that, only to be supported by this archaeological evidence is just amazing.” Via CTV News Vancouver Island , The Independent , and IFL Science Images via screenshot and Hakai Institute Twitter

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Researchers discover 14,000-year-old Canadian village, one of North America’s oldest

Newly discovered ancient human species in South Africa had a tiny brain

September 10, 2015 by  
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The recent discovery of a previously unknown humanoid species has researchers scratching their heads. Although every new piece of evidence of ancient human history helps to redraw the picture of our past, the discovery of this species in South Africa, named Homo naledi , is perplexing in new ways, as it possesses a curious mix of features. It was also found alongside evidence of more modern burial practices. What will this new evidence tell us about where we come from? Read the rest of Newly discovered ancient human species in South Africa had a tiny brain

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Newly discovered ancient human species in South Africa had a tiny brain

This stunning passive home in Seattle is 51% more energy-efficient than its neighbors

September 10, 2015 by  
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Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human?

January 29, 2015 by  
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Researchers recently discovered a fossilized jawbone that could have belonged to a new type of prehistoric human. The jawbone, originally found by fishermen in the Penghu Channel near Taiwan, has features which suggest it predates previously discovered hominids. Taiwanese fishermen found the fossilized jawbone and sold it to a local antique shop. Researchers later discovered the mandible, and were amazed when they realized what the bone could indicate. Read the rest of Did scientists just discover a new kind of ancient human? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient hominids , ancient humans , ancient man , asia , bones , discovery , early man , evolution , fossilized human jawbone , fossils , history , human bones , News , prehistoric , research , science , Taiwan

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Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA

January 29, 2015 by  
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After the State of the Union  Address and the touting of the abundance of our natural resources , you’d probably think that our natural gas game in the U.S. is strong. Meanwhile, the big environmental organizations are going off about the Keystone XL Pipeline , and smaller grassroots non profits are fighting eminent domain (not to mention exploding ) pipelines like the Penn East and the Atlantic Sunrise, along with the air-polluting compressor station infrastructure that accompanies them. While all that’s going on, hundreds of thousands of abandoned oil and gas wells throughout the country are leaking extraordinary amounts of methane and being ignored by political leaders who continue to support “clean-burning” natural gas. Read the rest of Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: abandoned , air , Air quality , ban fracking , carbon dioxide , Climate Change , dangerous , DEP , department of Environmental Protection , Environment , environmental protection agency , epa , fossil fuels , fracking , gas , gas wells , government , greenhouse gases , health effects , leaking , McKean county , methane , natural gas , no frack , oil and gas , oil wells , PA , pennsylvania , Policy , princeton , regulations , renewable energy , research , shale gas , stanford , studies , united states , university , water issues

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Abandoned oil and gas wells are leaking methane across the USA

Nendo’s new Chocolatexture lets you taste the meaning of Japanese words

January 29, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Nendo’s new Chocolatexture lets you taste the meaning of Japanese words Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Chocolatexture , Designer of the Year , geometric , Japanese design , Maison&Objet , Nendo , textured chocolate

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How Nature Inspired the Alphabet

March 14, 2010 by  
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32,000 years, ancient humans gathered in a cave in Lascaux, France, where, by firelight, they created the first hand-drawn forms–scenes depicting man’s relationship with the natural world . The favorite subject in those first drawings was the ancient ox , so impressive in stature and strength, that it was deified by our earliest ancestors. This reverence for nature remained as civilizations formed, and with it, written language

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