Dramatic fountain and plaza define Foster + Partners newest Apple Store in Milan

July 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dramatic fountain and plaza define Foster + Partners newest Apple Store in Milan

Foster + Partners has unveiled images of Milan’s newest Apple Store—and it’s just as strikingly gorgeous as we expected. Building off of Apple’s “Town Square” retail store concept and the city’s legacy of impressive public piazzas, the Apple Piazza Liberty Store features a new public plaza where locals and visitors can gather and enjoy views of a new dramatic fountain. The store is sunken below grade and includes a spacious, light-filled interior with mature live trees set in raised planters. Located off of Corso Vittorio Emanuele, one of the most popular pedestrian streets in the city, Apple Piazza Liberty grabs attention with its stunning fountain made up of two rectilinear pools and vertical water jets. Visitors can observe the fountain from the broad stone steps of the Amphitheater leading down to the sunken Apple Store or enter the fountain through the 26-foot-tall glass-covered entrance enveloped by dramatic views and sounds of cascading water. “[It’s] an immersive recreation of the childhood game of running through fountains, the experience changes throughout the day as sunlight filters through the water, while at night the glass ceiling creates a kaleidoscopic effect, with the water falling down the walls, and its reflections travelling infinitely up the sky,” explain the architects in their press release. Stefan Behling, Head of Studio at Foster + Partners, adds: “The fountain is an expression of child-like excitement that speaks to each one of us. In its simplicity, it echoes the idea of walking into a big fountain without getting wet, and the joy of being alive.” Related: Foster + Partners-designed Apple Store glows like a paper lantern in Macau The fountain’s waterfall effect can be seen below-grade in a second wall of water at the base of the Amphitheater . The Amphitheater steps and surrounding plaza were paved with Beola Grigia, a luminous local stone from Lombardy, and flanked by 21 new Gleditisia Sunburst trees. Inside, the interior is “metaphorically carved from the same stone as the plaza above,” with a stepped ceiling and skylights that let in natural light. + Foster + Partners Images by Nigel Young/ Foster + Partners

Read the rest here:
Dramatic fountain and plaza define Foster + Partners newest Apple Store in Milan

Timber wedding venue in China mirrors the mountainous landscape

July 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Timber wedding venue in China mirrors the mountainous landscape

When charged with adding a multi-functional building to a mountain resort in China, Shanghai-based firm  AIM Architecture used the stunning landscape as inspiration. Located slightly away from the resort’s existing buildings, MuWeCo stands out for its dramatic vaulted roofs that mimic the outline of the mountain range in the background. The Fushengyu Hot Springs Resort is tucked into the remote foothills of the Luo Fu Shan range in Sichuan, China. The resort has multiple buildings, including the main spa building  and various villas and small apartments that cater to guests looking to enjoy the picturesque setting. Related: Elegant Japanese wedding chapel mimics curved leaves The resort management wanted a new building on-site to provide extra space for practical uses such as a wedding hall , exhibition area or conference rooms. However, the building’s design was completely inspired by nature. According to the project description, the architects’ concept aimed to create an open space that put the focus on the majestic, mountainous landscape. To blend the building into this stunning backdrop, the architects created a series of striking sloped roofs that evoke the feeling of being under a tent. The dramatic design continues throughout the interior, where the curved ceiling panels dotted with tiny lights create a vibrant atmosphere. The walls of the building are clad almost entirely with glass panels, allowing optimal natural light to flood the interior while providing endless views of the surrounding scenery. The interior is spacious and open, with warm timber and cork paneling and flooring made out of local river stones, again creating a strong connection with nature. To really soak in the surroundings, guests are invited to enjoy the views from the large open-air deck, which provides 360-degree views of the mountain range in the background. According to the architects, they drew inspiration for MuWeCo’s design from the resort ‘s incredible setting and from the desire to ensure complete and total relaxation for guests: “People visit spas for rest and relaxation, and this design opportunity allowed us to re-imagine nature and landscape as public spaces, and our relationship to both. The architecture provides a contrast for the stunning scenery, and has proven to be a lasting and beautiful space for wellness.” + AIM Architecture Via Archdaily Images via AIM Architecture

Read the original here:
Timber wedding venue in China mirrors the mountainous landscape

After a makeover, this local shack becomes the envy of the neighborhood

July 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on After a makeover, this local shack becomes the envy of the neighborhood

Nearly everyone has strolled through a darling neighborhood and suddenly come across an orphan house. Sitting silently, often in the shadows of the prettier houses, there’s a neglected home that once had dignity. A family of four discovered such a home in an Iowa City neighborhood, and with some TLC and help from Neumann Monson Architects , they transformed it into a star of the community. Seeking a tranquil neighborhood near the University of Iowa campus, the family found the unpolished jewel, built in the ’60s, on a quiet street lined with lovely modest homes. It was a smaller, 1,300-square-foot home, and years of high-turnover renters had left their mark, earning the abode the local moniker of “ The Shack .” Related: O2 Studio renovated an old Netherlands home into a gorgeous energy-neutral villa Determined to change that image, the family embarked on a mission of a cosmetic makeover that would also embrace the home’s carbon-neutral potential. After commissioning Neumann Monson Architects for the project, the family wanted to create a guest room and recreation room in the formerly unfinished 500-square-foot basement. Then, the team expanded the ground floor from 1,300 square feet to 2,500 square feet with a slab-on-grade modification. All these upgrades used standard post and beam construction coupled with steel wood framing and steel columns. To sustain the eco-friendly theme, the home’s walls and ceilings were lined with insulated sheathing and foamed-in-insulation, creating R-24 walls and an R-40 roof. Upgraded windows take full advantage of natural light without sacrificing the mid-century spirit. A new tongue-and-groove bleached cedar ventilated rain screen beautified the home’s exterior. Energy-saving renovations also included new super-efficient climate control systems, such as LED lighting , EnergyStar appliances and a closed-loop, horizontally-bored geothermal system with fresh air energy recovery. An 8.4kW photovoltaic array powers the LED lighting, mechanical systems and energy-efficient appliances. The family enjoys the credit they receive from the utility company for their home’s surplus energy, but they love the homey ambiance of the neighborhood even more. A nearby property is undergoing a similar overhaul, so their success appears to be contagious. + Neumann Monson Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Integrated Studio

Excerpt from: 
After a makeover, this local shack becomes the envy of the neighborhood

Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home

July 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home

At first glance, this house in Prague may look like a fanciful and whimsical work of art with little regard for practicality, but a deeper inspection reveals that careful computer modeling and budgeting actually informed its unusual design. Czech architect and co-founder Jan Šépka of the local practice Šépka Architekti designed this organic abode, called the House in the Orchard, as one of his latest experimental residences in the country. Raised on a stalk like a mushroom, the modernist three-story home was crafted in response to the steeply sloped site and comprises a living area of 861 square feet. Designed for one of Šépka’s old friends on the outskirts of Prague, the House in the Orchard is raised on a concrete pillar to mitigate the steep slope and to avoid the high construction cost of a traditional foundation. The three-story dwelling’s asymmetrical shape was conceived through  computer modeling and is split into triangular spaces for stability. To create the home’s concrete-like appearance, the architect layered a gray, waterproof skin atop polyurethane sprayed on top of plywood sheets; the final effect gives the structure its deceptively heavy look. A ramp on the upper part of the slope leads to the entrance and the first floor, which consists of the living area, kitchen and dining room with a wood-burning stove and a large window that frames views of the landscape to the north. Modernist furniture is mixed with custom plywood furnishings designed by Šépka. Related: Sprawling Villa H in Prague adapts to a steep plot with a creative 3-level layout A plywood staircase with open treads and a metal railing leads up to the second floor where the bedrooms and bathroom are located. The study can be found on the top floor. A large skylight in the study draws natural light deep into the home. + Šépka Architekti Via Wallpaper* Images by Tomáš Malý

View post: 
Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home

This breezy bamboo amphitheater pops up in just 25 days

February 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This breezy bamboo amphitheater pops up in just 25 days

A beautiful bamboo amphitheater has risen in the lush tropics of Rio de Janeiro. Brazilian studio Bambutec Design crafted the 2,150-square-foot structure with the help of computer modeling in addition to old-fashioned model making by hand. The Bamboo Amphitheater Space Structure was built for the green campus of the Pontifical Catholic University and was assembled in 25 working days. Set on the banks of the Rainha River and screened in by bamboo, this bamboo structure complements its verdant surroundings with its dark green roof and exposed bamboo frame. The 1.4-ton amphitheater was built atop a foundation previously designed by architect Carlos Pingarrilho. Low landscape impact was emphasized throughout the design and build process, which made use of mobile prefabricated modules, pantographic grids, textile membranes, and a mobile lifting device. The ultra-lightweight dome is anchored to the ground with reinforced concrete and six touch-down pylons. Related: Dumping ground reborn as a bamboo and rammed-earth community space in Vietnam “The dome employs a textile hybrid space structure formed by self-supporting treated bamboo bipods, tensile pantographic gridshells and self-stressed active bending beams, avoiding buckling of the structural members,” wrote the design team. “Gridshell modules were disposed discontinuously in overlapping steps 0.5m apart, allowing air circulation and natural lighting. Active bending beams and pantographic gridshells were subjected to prescribed external loads in a process of elastic deformation during assembly.” The project was inaugurated in 2014 and used to host events, shows, and lectures. + Bambutec Design Via ArchDaily Images via Bambutec Design

Read more here: 
This breezy bamboo amphitheater pops up in just 25 days

Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

January 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

A newly opened youth hostel in Bayreuth, Germany offers much more than just a clean bed and shower—the 180-bed Y-shaped building embraces community, holistic sustainability, and a passion for sports. Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA) designed the hostel as an extension of the landscape with natural materials and a curvaceous form that’s organic and contemporary. Commissioned by DJH Bayern, the eye-catching youth hostel takes on a distinctive Y shape chosen “because it cleverly generates a connective central space and interweaves the interior and exterior spaces, offering expansive views and multiple accessible openings to the sports fields and gardens.” Sports are a major focus of the design and the hostel is equipped with sports fields, adventure playgrounds and volleyball terraces. The building’s universal design makes it accessible to all kinds of users for optimum use of the facility. Related: Nha Trang’s first hostel built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Vietnam A central atrium at the heart of the hostel serves as the social hub with a light-filled amphitheater that branches out to the reception, seminar rooms, bistro, kitchen, sport facilities, and bedrooms spread out across two floors. Natural, locally sourced materials are used throughout and were built with local techniques. Renewable energy powers the hostel and pollution reduction is integrated in the design. A highly flexible modular wooden wall system with modular custom built-in furniture was used for the hostel’s 45 rooms. The use of modular, replaceable walls also allows for future reuse of the building as a kindergarten, school or retirement home. + Laboratory for Visionary Architecture Images by HN?fele Huber

View original here: 
Y-shaped German hostel looks at sustainability from all angles

OMAs MPavilion 2017 with a floating roof opens today in Melbourne

October 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on OMAs MPavilion 2017 with a floating roof opens today in Melbourne

Melbourne is heating up for the summer with a new OMA-designed amphitheater. OMA founder Rem Koolhaas and colleague Daniel Gianotten just completed MPavilion 2017, a temporary pavilion that opened today in Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens. Commissioned by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation, MPavilion 2017 is the fourth annual architect-designed summer pavilion for the city and is OMA’s first Australian commission. The multifunctional amphitheater will host hundreds of free events throughout the four-month season. OMA designed MPavilion 2017 as a 19-by-19-meter aluminum-clad steel structure that transforms to accommodate a variety of unexpected programming. Surrounded by an artificial hill landscaped with native plants , the adaptable amphitheater comprises one fixed tiered grandstand and one moveable grandstand that rotates to open up to the park. The floating translucent roof is built with a two-meter-deep gridded, machine-like canopy with embedded advanced lighting technology. Related: Studio Mumbai unveils handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo “Our design for MPavilion 2017 is intended to provoke all kinds of activities through its configurable nature and a materiality that relates to its direct surroundings,” said Rem Koolhaas and David Gianotten of OMA. “We are happy that MPavilion can perform as a theater of debate around the city and its development, and contribute to the ongoing civic discourse of Melbourne.” MPavilion will be open everyday from 9AM to 4PM until February 4, 2018. At the end of the four-month season MPavilion will be moved to a permanent new home within Melbourne’s Central Business District. + OMA + MPavilion 2017 Images by Timothy Burgess and John Gollings

Original post:
OMAs MPavilion 2017 with a floating roof opens today in Melbourne

Spiraling treetop walkway gives visitors a birds eye view of a Danish forest

June 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Spiraling treetop walkway gives visitors a birds eye view of a Danish forest

A stunning new adventure park in Denmark is taking visitors to new heights—literally. Architecture studio EFFEKT designed the Camp Adventure Treetop Experience, a unique destination that aims to reconnect people to nature by elevating them high above the treetop canopy. Located in the preserved forest Gisselfeld Klosters Skove, the Treetop Experience aims improve accessibility to the forest while minimizing landscape disturbance. EFFEKT unveiled their designs for the Treetop Experience this year as part of an expansion to Camp Adventure, an existing sports facility with treetop climbing and aerial zip-lines located one hour south of Copenhagen , Denmark. A wide variety of landscapes are found in Gisselfeld Klosters Skove, including various forest types, lakes, creeks, and wetlands. To show off environmental diversity, EFFEKT designed a winding 600-meter-long treetop walk that sensitively passes through the landscape. The treetop walk is divided into a higher and lower walkway with the former located in the oldest parts of the forest, while the latter is situated in the forest’s younger areas. The walk begins at Camp Adventure Farmhouse and is punctuated with educational features and activities such as an aviary , suspended amphitheater, walkway loops for tree observation, and a variety of viewpoints. Related: Sinuous Boomslang Walkway Gives Kirstenbosch Visitors a Taste of the Treetops in Cape Town The walkway culminates with the star built attraction, a 45-meter-tall observation viewpoint platform with an accessible spiraling ramp. The tower’s hourglass shape gives visitors an up-close look at the tree canopy, and is wrapped with a structural skeleton made up of 120-degree rotated steel elements. “The geometry and spacing of the ramp fluctuates according to the changing curvature, write the architects. “The ramp becomes a sculptural element in itself making the journey to the top a unique experience.” The observation platform offers 360-degree panoramic views of the preserved forest. + EFFEKT

See more here:
Spiraling treetop walkway gives visitors a birds eye view of a Danish forest

Nature-inspired Chrysalis pavilion pops up in a Maryland forest

May 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nature-inspired Chrysalis pavilion pops up in a Maryland forest

New York-based architecture studio MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY completed an experimental amphitheater that “provides an experience around the clock.” Located in Merriweather Park of Columbia, Maryland the organic, nature-inspired venue, called The Chrysalis, comprises cascading green arches that give it a sculptural appearance. In addition to their eye-catching beauty and structural support, The Chrysalis’ arches also vary in size and function. The largest arch frames Stage A, the main area for events located next to the smaller Stage B. Other arches frame a truck loading dock, a grand staircase entrance, and balconies with views to the city. The digitally designed amphitheater was created with a self-supporting shell with an exoskeleton of steel tubing. Despite the 12,000-square-foot venue’s lightweight appearance, the sturdy structure can sustain 2,000 pounds of equipment on each of its 70 point loads. Nearly 8,000 aluminum shingles fabricated by Zahner clad The Chrysalis. Related: MARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY’s ultralight informal amphitheater in France looks like an opening chrysalis “Each shingle is painted one of four shades of green that is taken from nature and pushed to the point of artificiality,” write the architects. “Together they amount to a subtle green gradient that renders The Chrysalis an iconic signal at the same time that it is camouflaged into its natural surroundings.” + MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Images via MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY and Zahner

More here:
Nature-inspired Chrysalis pavilion pops up in a Maryland forest

Floating ring-shaped memorial celebrates Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai

February 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Floating ring-shaped memorial celebrates Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai

This ring-shaped memorial dedicated to internationally renowned Kenyan environmental political activist and Nobel laureate Wangari Maathai, celebrates human rights and environmental conservation. Boogertman + Partners architects designed the circular form to emphasize the notion of “walks and talks”, solidifying Wangari’s enduring legacy. A long timber-decked route leads visitors over a body of water to the main entrance of the memorial located beneath the structural floating ring. The underside rests on the terrain which envelops an auditorium at the rear. The simple circular form unfolds the life of Wangari as a conversation en route, referencing her legacy and a childhood sense of wonder. Related: Inhabitat talks with NYC’s 9/11 Memorial designer Michael Arad The building houses the main exhibition space , library, conference centre and functional areas. The courtyard , enveloped by the ring, contains an amphitheater , a mausoleum and a subterranean space. + Boogertman + Partners  Via v2com

View post:
Floating ring-shaped memorial celebrates Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Maathai

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1340 access attempts in the last 7 days.