73 million trees to be planted in largest reforestation project ever

October 31, 2017 by  
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Conservation International aims to plant 73 million trees in the Brazilian Amazon as part of the largest ever undertaking of its kind. In what is being called the “arc of deforestation” in the Brazilian states of Amazonas, Acre, Pará, and Rondônia, as well as throughout the Xingu watershed, trees will be planted as part of a project that, in the short-term, aims to restore 70,000 acres of tropical forest. “If the world is to hit the 1.2°C or 2°C [degrees of warming] target that we all agreed to in Paris, then protecting tropical forests in particular has to be a big part of that,” said M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, in an interview with Fast Company . “It’s not just the trees that matter, but what kind of trees ,” said Sanjayan. “If you’re really thinking about getting carbon dioxide out of atmosphere, then tropical forests are the ones that end up mattering the most.” Ceasing deforestation would allow for the absorption of 37 percent of the world’s annual carbon emissions yet scientists worry that 20 percent of the Amazon may be deforested in the next two decades, in addition to the 20 percent that was deforested in the past 40 years. To combat this rapid pace of destruction, Conservation International is utilizing new, efficient planting techniques that could be applied worldwide. “This is not a stunt,” said Sanjayan. “It is a carefully controlled experiment to literally figure out how to do tropical restoration at scale, so that people can replicate it and we can drive the costs down dramatically.” Related: Hurricane Maria ravaged the only tropical rainforest in the United States The planting method used in the project is known as muvuca , which is a Portuguese word to describe many people in a small place. In  muvuca, hundreds of native tree seeds of various species are spread over every inch of deforested land. Natural selection then allows the most suited to survive and thrive. A 2014 study from the Food and Agriculture Organization and Biodiversity International found that more than 90 percent of native tree species planted using the  muvuca method germinate and are well suited to survive drought conditions for up to six months. “With plant-by-plant reforestation techniques, you get a typical density of about 160 plants per hectare,” said Rodrigo Medeiros, Conservation International’s vice president of the Brazil program and project lead, according to Fast Company . “With muvuca, the initial outcome is 2,500 species per hectare. And after 10 years, you can reach 5,000 trees per hectare. It’s much more diverse, much more dense, and less expensive than traditional techniques.” Via Fast Company Images via Depositphotos (1)

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73 million trees to be planted in largest reforestation project ever

Climate change and volcanic eruptions could lead to years without summer

October 31, 2017 by  
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Scientists warn that if climate change continues at its current pace, oceans may lose their ability to reduce atmospheric effects from volcanic sulfur and aerosols as they have done in the past. This means that volcanic eruptions in the future may lead to “years without summer,” as occurred in 1815 after the April eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia . New research led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in the US both confirms that specific eruption’s role in altering the global climate and the role that future eruptions might play if the ocean’s temperature continues to be affected by melting sea ice and rising global temperatures. The researchers used data from Community Earth System Model’s (CESM) Last Millennium Ensemble Project, which provides simulations of Earth’s climate based on the geological record from 850 through 2005, to determine that the Mount Tambora eruption caused a notable cooling event on the global climate. Sulfur dioxide sent into the atmosphere became sulfate particles known as aerosols and reflected light away from the Earth. This resulted in a so-called “year without summer,” in which crops across North America and Europe suffered tremendous losses due to cold temperatures and blocked sunlight. Related: Two giant volcanic eruptions formed Yellowstone’s iconic caldera The oceans played an important role in returning the climate to relative normalcy through a process in which the colder water of the ocean sinks while warmer water rises to the surface, helping to warm the surrounding land and atmosphere . However, due to changing ocean temperatures resulting from climate change, if an eruption similar to Mount Tambora were to occur in 2085, the ocean would be less able to bring about climate stabilization. Study author Otto-Bliesner wrote, “The response of the climate system to the 1815 eruption of Indonesia’s Mount Tambora gives us a perspective on potential surprises for the future, but with the twist that our climate system may respond much differently”. + Nature Communications Via Alphr Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Climate change and volcanic eruptions could lead to years without summer

Plant-based water filtration system works like a small Amazon rainforest

July 12, 2017 by  
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We take water for granted far too often. Whole civilizations have fallen as a result of over-exploiting water sources, according to Royal College of Art (RCA) graduate student Pratik Ghosh , so it’s imperative that we treat what we have with care. So Ghosh designed Drop by Drop , a plant -based water filtration system that explores more sustainable methods of obtaining water. The system is capable of cleansing home wastewater , and growing herbs at the same time. Drop by Drop filters water much like transpiration processes in the Amazon rainforest . According to Ghosh, his prototype is a mini biosphere that operates by keeping four factors crucial for transpiration – humidity, light, heat and wind – at optimal levels. “The moisture-laden air is strategically pulled out of the system and condensed to form pure distilled water,” Ghosh said on his website. Related: 6 ways to purify water without expensive technology A glass dome covers a plant in Drop by Drop, and greywater can be added to the system via pipes. Then, purification is up to the plant itself: a light in the system sets off photosynthesis , and the plant gives off water vapor that can ultimately be condensed to become distilled water. A pump controls airflow and helps speed up the process. Added salt can turn the distilled water into drinking water. The system doesn’t require much maintenance. If the owner’s away, Drop by Drop becomes a self-sustaining biosphere after pipes are stoppered thanks to microbes in the soil and insects providing carbon dioxide. The system puts oxygen into the surrounding air. Right now, the prototype takes 12 hours to filter one glass of water. But Ghosh said the system could be scaled up to cover a typical home rooftop, and could then filter around 42 gallons in 12 hours. Ghosh told Dezeen, “The idea is to change the way we procure and consume water at a larger level. In order to do that, there needs to be a change in the value system and what better place to start than the home? One can pour dirty water collected from the kitchen or even the bathroom into the system and the plants help you filter it.” Drop by Drop is his final year project and was recently on display at the RCA Show 2017 in London. + Pratik Ghosh Via Dezeen Images via Pratik Ghosh

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Plant-based water filtration system works like a small Amazon rainforest

Plant-based water filtration system works like a small Amazon rainforest

July 12, 2017 by  
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We take water for granted far too often. Whole civilizations have fallen as a result of over-exploiting water sources, according to Royal College of Art (RCA) graduate student Pratik Ghosh , so it’s imperative that we treat what we have with care. So Ghosh designed Drop by Drop , a plant -based water filtration system that explores more sustainable methods of obtaining water. The system is capable of cleansing home wastewater , and growing herbs at the same time. Drop by Drop filters water much like transpiration processes in the Amazon rainforest . According to Ghosh, his prototype is a mini biosphere that operates by keeping four factors crucial for transpiration – humidity, light, heat and wind – at optimal levels. “The moisture-laden air is strategically pulled out of the system and condensed to form pure distilled water,” Ghosh said on his website. Related: 6 ways to purify water without expensive technology A glass dome covers a plant in Drop by Drop, and greywater can be added to the system via pipes. Then, purification is up to the plant itself: a light in the system sets off photosynthesis , and the plant gives off water vapor that can ultimately be condensed to become distilled water. A pump controls airflow and helps speed up the process. Added salt can turn the distilled water into drinking water. The system doesn’t require much maintenance. If the owner’s away, Drop by Drop becomes a self-sustaining biosphere after pipes are stoppered thanks to microbes in the soil and insects providing carbon dioxide. The system puts oxygen into the surrounding air. Right now, the prototype takes 12 hours to filter one glass of water. But Ghosh said the system could be scaled up to cover a typical home rooftop, and could then filter around 42 gallons in 12 hours. Ghosh told Dezeen, “The idea is to change the way we procure and consume water at a larger level. In order to do that, there needs to be a change in the value system and what better place to start than the home? One can pour dirty water collected from the kitchen or even the bathroom into the system and the plants help you filter it.” Drop by Drop is his final year project and was recently on display at the RCA Show 2017 in London. + Pratik Ghosh Via Dezeen Images via Pratik Ghosh

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Plant-based water filtration system works like a small Amazon rainforest

Beautiful co-working space takes over a former industrial factory in Mexico City

July 12, 2017 by  
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An old factory in Mexico City has been gutted and repurposed into a modern co-working space with an industrial chic edge. Mexican architects Estudio Atemporal designed the adaptive reuse project, which takes advantage of the existing sawtooth roof and tall ceilings to create airy, light-filled spaces. Bright pops of color, timber surfaces, and an abundance of greenery go a long way in softening the heavy appearance of concrete columns and cinderblocks. Located in the Anáhuac neighbourhood, the co-working space, called Guateque , spans an entire city block with a 722-square-meter footprint. The building comprises two joined volumes: a two-story volume with a sawtooth roof and a three-story volume with a flat roof. The former comprises a greater diversity of co-working spaces , while the latter houses parking, communal kitchen and dining, and an open workshop-style space. Related: Tom Dixon transforms a 17th-century London church into a chic co-working space Natural light floods the building through clerestory windows. The architects installed glazed divider walls to delineate spaces within the building without obstructing the light. A mezzanine level was installed to create intimate work areas with low ceilings. Ping-pong tables with yellow boards also punctuate the co-working area. + Estudio Atemporal Via Dezeen

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Beautiful co-working space takes over a former industrial factory in Mexico City

Scientists warn Amazon jungle faces death spiral

March 14, 2017 by  
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A new study reveals that the Amazon rainforest may face a “death spiral” of deforestation and drought over the next century. The data comes from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany, and while the entire forest is unlikely to disappear from the face of the Earth, large parts of the region are currently considered to be at risk. The study explores what might happen as climate change causes the region to experience more frequent and more intense dry seasons. While it may seem obvious that reduced rainfall causes trees to die off and forests to shrink, it’s also been shown that forest loss intensified regional droughts as well. When these two factors occur together, it can cause a self-reinforcing feedback loop that could wipe out large portions of forest. Related: A student-designed drone is hunting illegal loggers in the Amazon Rainforest It’s unclear exactly how much of the Amazon is at risk – computer models show this type of forest dieback could threaten up to 38 percent of the Amazon basin. However, researchers stress that eventually most of the Amazon forest could potentially be at risk. The future isn’t completely without hope, however: the study also found that the more diverse an area’s vegetation is, the less susceptible it is to the effects of the feedback loop. So increasing biodiversity could be a vital tool in protecting the Amazon – and other vulnerable regions – from the worst effects of climate change . The full study has been published in the journal Nature Communications . Via The Independent Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Scientists warn Amazon jungle faces death spiral

Amazon deforestation leaps 16 percent in 2015

December 14, 2015 by  
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The Brazilian government has released some disturbing news : despite years of progress combatting deforestation , 2015 saw a 16 percent increase in the number of trees destroyed. In total, 2,251 square miles (5,830 square kilometers) of forest were lost between July 2014 and August 2015, an area about half the size of Los Angeles. Read the rest of Amazon deforestation leaps 16 percent in 2015

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Amazon deforestation leaps 16 percent in 2015

A student-designed drone is hunting illegal loggers in the Amazon Rainforest

June 9, 2015 by  
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Technology has brought the reality of deforestation in the Amazon into a whole new light: Images from the Landsat satellites have provided us a look at the sheer scale of the devastation there and Google has created a time lapse video of 40 years of destruction in the region. Now, those working to preserve the region’s diverse ecosystem have turned to drones to help stop illegal logging and mining activities. Using $5000 dollar wing drones, custom designed by a Wake Forest University graduate student, the Amazon Basin Conservation Association in Peru is catching deforestation as it happens—giving them a greater shot at stopping loggers in their tracks. Read the rest of A student-designed drone is hunting illegal loggers in the Amazon Rainforest Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: amazon conservation , amazon rainforest , deforestation , drones amazon , drones conservation , environmental destruction , illegal logging , illegal mining , los amigos , uavs , wake forest

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A student-designed drone is hunting illegal loggers in the Amazon Rainforest

Floating gold roof tops BIG’s proposal for a new transportation hub in Västerås

June 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Floating gold roof tops BIG’s proposal for a new transportation hub in Västerås Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: big , Bjarke Ingels Group , Build Away the Barriers , redevelopment plan , Vasteras , Västerås Transit Hub by BIG

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Floating gold roof tops BIG’s proposal for a new transportation hub in Västerås

Monkey Magic Eco Art Raises Awareness of Environmental Issues in the Peruvian Amazon

October 31, 2014 by  
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Peru’s region of Madre de Dios is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth–but the lush Amazonian area is under serious threat by deforestation and illegal gold mining. Although Peru is home to the second-largest amount of rainforest in the world, the rise of gold mining has devastated nearly 370,000 acres of the country’s Amazon . To raise awareness of these environmental issues and spark dialogue on how best to balance resource conservation with the economic needs of the community, the nonprofit Eco Art Installations created inspiring eco art from locally sourced leaves, flowers, seeds, and trash. The artists involved include Sue, an orphaned howler monkey; Gypsy Voyager’s Char Evans, Christine Ashley Guckert, and Anthony Zaccone; and KamranJon’s Kamran Pakseresht. Prints and photos of the artwork can be purchased at Saatchi Art . + Eco Art Installations The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Amazon , amazon rainforest , Art , deforestation , eco-art , eco-art installations , gold mining , gypsy voyager , howler monkey , kamranjon , madre de Dios , monkey magic eco art , peru , Peruvian Amazon , reader submitted content

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Monkey Magic Eco Art Raises Awareness of Environmental Issues in the Peruvian Amazon

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