New images show greenery engulfing Singapores tropical skyscraper

August 30, 2018 by  
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When we last saw local design practice WOHA Architects’ 30-story Oasia Hotel Downtown in Singapore, the tropical skyscraper had only begun to sprout the lush landscaping that would later overtake the building’s facade. Now, a little over a year-and-a-half later, we’ve been treated to new images of the high-rise that has become increasingly enveloped in creeping vines. This combination of nature and architecture is continued into the building’s embrace of indoor-outdoor spaces, particularly in the sky gardens designed by Spanish architect Patricia Urquiola , that feature verdant landscaping and spacious pools. Located in Singapore’s central business district, the Oasia Hotel features a sealed-off, air-conditioned tower sheathed in red aluminum mesh cladding. More than 20 species of creepers and vines grow on the facade and will envelop the exterior in a process largely helped along by the country’s humid tropical climate. The plants were also selected for low-maintenance and ability to withstand strong winds, particularly at the top of the tower. The vertical garden set against a vibrant red backdrop not only serves a striking visual component for the building, but it also helps reduce the urban heat island effect and clean the air of pollutants. Rising to a height of over 600 feet, the tropical skyscraper comprises four large outdoor spaces. Three massive verandas occupy the 6th, 12th and 21st floors, while a luxurious roof terrace can be found on the 27th floor. The roof terrace is protected from solar heat gain and noise pollution by a 10-story-tall screen constructed from the same material as the building’s red mesh aluminum cladding. Greenery also grows over the screen to give the rooftop terrace the impression of a hidden oasis. Related: This plant-covered Singapore skyscraper is the tropical building of the future Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola led the design of the outdoor spaces as well as the hotel interior. To give each of the outdoor locations an oasis-like appeal, she introduced verdant greenery and — on the 21st and 27th floors — added swimming pools lined with beautiful AGROB BUCHTAL tiles. + WOHA Architects Images via Infinitude

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New images show greenery engulfing Singapores tropical skyscraper

Off-grid Glass Cabin is built of recycled materials on reclaimed Iowan prairie

August 30, 2018 by  
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Indianapolis-based architecture and design studio atelierRISTING recently completed the Glass Cabin, a family retreat that operates off the grid with minimal site impact. Designed and built by the architects on land belonging to a sesquicentennial farm in northeastern Iowa, the property is elevated off the ground to minimize disturbance of the grasslands and floodplain. Built in the shape of a wood-framed pole barn, the low-maintenance building is powered with solar energy. Set in a clearing in the woods next to the Wapsipinicon River, the Glass Cabin derives its name from  full-height low-E insulated glazing that wraps around its northern facade. Barn-inspired timber doors slide over the northern glass front for security when the retreat isn’t used. Flanked by outdoor terraces, the elevated home includes two bedrooms, one bathroom with a composting toilet, a great room, kitchenette and screened porch within 1,120 square feet. Indoor-outdoor living is embraced throughout the light-filled abode, as is natural ventilation. Natural and reclaimed materials were used throughout the off-grid home. Western Red Cedar was used for the structural framing, barn doors, exterior and interior siding and exterior decking because of its natural resistance to moisture, insects and fire. The timber was left untreated and will develop a silvery gray patina over time to match the aged barns nearby. Natural cork was used for the flooring, while the wall cabinets were custom-built from cedar. “While primarily a three-season retreat, a Norwegian designed wood stove provides warmth for the holidays,” the architects added. Related: A net-zero modern farmhouse kicks off a sustainable community in Texas To minimize construction waste, standard lumber sizes were used. The Glass Cabin, oriented on a north-south axis, relies on passive solar strategies to keep its energy footprint at a minimum. Energy efficiency is also secured with highly efficient mineral wool and rigid insulation, achieved by using R-30 floors, an R-20 roof and R-15 walls. The white metal roof also helps to minimize heat gain. + atelierRISTING Via ArchDaily Images by Steven & Carol Risting

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Off-grid Glass Cabin is built of recycled materials on reclaimed Iowan prairie

A charming net-zero cottage in Cornwall asks $845K

August 30, 2018 by  
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A sweet English cottage that has been treated to a sustainable transformation has recently hit the market for £650,000 (approximately $845,000 USD). Set within 11 acres of a private nature reserve in the small town of Lostwithiel in Cornwall , England, this beautiful retreat offers an idyllic return to nature with a minimized environmental footprint. Updated by Guy Stansfeld Architects , the zero-energy home is powered by solar energy as well as a ground-source heat pump for heating and hot water. Spanning an area of 2,100 square feet, the home was renovated by the current owner Guy Stansfeld, who breathed new life into the historic yet decaying estate cottage over the course of four years. The house, dubbed Rosedale, has been restored in white stucco and re-organized to follow an open-plan, double-height layout spread out across a single level with four bedrooms. Completed in 2015, the updated home’s modern interiors are filled with natural light and views of the outdoors, which includes vistas of wetlands, woodland, a garden and a pond. Blonde wood paneling, vaulted ceilings and white surfaces help create an airy atmosphere. Stansfeld added an extension built with SIPs for speed of construction and superior insulation. There’s also a kitchen garden area and ample parking for cars. Related: This dream job lets you live on a Cornish island with a medieval castle All the fixtures and lighting in the home were selected for their low energy consumption. Radiant floor heating also keeps energy bills to a minimum. Since Rosedale is powered with photovoltaic panels , Stansfeld has tapped into the local feed-in tariff to recoup his electricity costs by selling surplus energy to the National Grid. This effectively brings the well-insulated dwelling to net-zero energy status. The Rosedale property is now on the market and listed through Savills with the real estate agent Ben Davis for £650,000. + Guy Stansfeld Architects Images via Savills

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A charming net-zero cottage in Cornwall asks $845K

Pitched Blanco Oostduinkerke Residence conceals parking under dune grasses in coastal Belgium

April 30, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Pitched Blanco Oostduinkerke Residence conceals parking under dune grasses in coastal Belgium Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aluminum cladding , belgium , Blanco Oostduinkerke Residence , BURO II & ARCHI+I , coastal architecture , contemporary coastal architecture , Daylighting , dune grasses , green design , marionettes , minimalist design , pitched house , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials , vernacular

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Pitched Blanco Oostduinkerke Residence conceals parking under dune grasses in coastal Belgium

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