Cutting Down on Lawn — Alternatives to Grass

August 13, 2019 by  
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Lawns are green in color only, and the odds are … The post Cutting Down on Lawn — Alternatives to Grass appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Cutting Down on Lawn — Alternatives to Grass

We Earthlings: The Average Commute Produces 23.05 Lbs. of CO2

August 13, 2019 by  
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What connects us all? Nature and our shared relationships through … The post We Earthlings: The Average Commute Produces 23.05 Lbs. of CO2 appeared first on Earth911.com.

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We Earthlings: The Average Commute Produces 23.05 Lbs. of CO2

Guide to Plant-Based Milk Alternatives

April 3, 2019 by  
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Even if you are not one of the 30 to … The post Guide to Plant-Based Milk Alternatives appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Guide to Plant-Based Milk Alternatives

We tried the new Impossible Burger at CES heres what we thought

January 8, 2019 by  
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The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2019 is in full swing in Las Vegas. While smart home technology, televisions and wearable tech takes center stage, many surprising innovations are grabbing media attention. Take, for instance, the latest iteration of an Inhabitat favorite — the Impossible Burger. We tried the newest recipe from Impossible at this year’s CES ; keep reading for our thoughts. Delicious in tacos or served as a classic burger, the Impossible Burger has become a favorite for vegetarians and vegans since its inception in 2016. Now, the company is debuting a new and improved recipe that boasts a flavor and texture identical to meat with a smaller impact on our planet than its animal-based counterpart. Related: Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019 The new recipe is gluten-free and remains free of animal hormones or antibiotics. The kosher-and halal-certified “meat” will please a wide array of people with dietary restrictions. In addition to its striking resemblance in taste and texture to meat, a serving of the new Impossible Burger offers the same amount of bioavailable protein and iron as a serving of traditional ground beef. It also boasts 30 percent less sodium and 40 percent less saturated fat than the original recipe. The original recipe used wheat in its ingredients, while the new burger is made with soy. We tasted the first round of patties made with the new recipe at Las Vegas ’ Border Grill. Executive chef Mike Minor praised the meat substitute, mentioning the smell and flavor of the new Impossible Burger is “addicting” to himself and his fellow chefs. With this in mind, we couldn’t wait to dig in. Our burger was cooked medium well and looked shockingly identical to a real beef patty cooked the same way. We could already see the juiciness and charred bits before taking a bite, but we were still surprised with how delicious the burger was. It tasted like a high-end burger made from animal protein — it was juicy, tender and full of flavor. As we all know, meat has a huge carbon footprint . With a meat alternative that mimics real meat so closely, the Impossible Burger could transition hardcore meat eaters to a plant-based alternative that saves water, energy and animal lives without compromising the distinct flavor and texture that so many other alternatives miss the mark on. The new recipe is rolling out to select restaurants starting Jan. 8, 2019 and will hit grocery store shelves later this year . + Impossible Images via Impossible

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We tried the new Impossible Burger at CES heres what we thought

FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

July 20, 2018 by  
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In a potential blow to almond and soy milk producers, the FDA plans to crack down on the usage of the term “milk” to refer to nondairy products. Current federal standards regarding the term’s usage were changed in April 2017 in an attempt to boost sales of dairy products, but the standards have not been strictly enforced. Now, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb is saying that “plant-based dairy imitators” popular among vegetarians and health-conscious individuals violate the organization’s official definition of milk: “the lacteal secretion, practically free from colostrum obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy cows.” According to the Gottlieb, “an almond doesn’t lactate.” The FDA has moved forward with the change despite the fact that several lawsuits are expected. Those protesting the distinction argue that various dictionary definitions cite milk as coming from both nuts and animals , with the earliest records that contain the name ‘almond milk’ dating back to the 16th century. The Food and Drug Administration has argued that it is protecting consumers who may be misled into buying the alternatives while in search of a dairy product. Related: Unreleased internal FDA emails show glyphosate weedkiller residue in almost every food tested Dairy manufacturers have been losing business to their counterparts in the nut industry, which might explain why they’re happy about the change. The worth of the dairy-alternative industry is projected to grow to over $34 billion in the next five years, while dairy producers have been facing falling prices and global oversupply. Chris Galen, a spokesperson for the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), expressed the group’s support for the FDA’s tightening of the reins on “dairy imitators (who) violate long standing federal standards.” While the FDA will have to take public comment and develop guidelines before it enacts the change, it seems that big dairy may already have gotten what it wanted. Via Treehugger Images via Shutterstock

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FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives

July 9, 2018 by  
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Food wrap choices have long focused on petroleum-base options, but … The post Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives

Infographic: Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Bottles

May 27, 2018 by  
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So you want to ditch your single-use plastic bottles, but … The post Infographic: Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Bottles appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Infographic: Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Bottles

Get Unstuck! 7 Nonstick Cookware Alternatives

May 21, 2018 by  
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Unless you’ve been living under a pile of perfluorochemical-coated pots … The post Get Unstuck! 7 Nonstick Cookware Alternatives appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Get Unstuck! 7 Nonstick Cookware Alternatives

9 Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Straws

April 24, 2018 by  
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Single-use plastic straws are an environmental problem that few people think … The post 9 Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Straws appeared first on Earth911.com.

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9 Alternatives to Single-Use Plastic Straws

Installing solar power and paying it forward

September 20, 2016 by  
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GRID Alternatives brings solar energy to low-income households by using volunteers to cut labor costs. I joined the volunteer crew at VERGE 16.

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Installing solar power and paying it forward

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