Americans, especially millennials and Gen Z, are embracing plant-based meat products

November 11, 2019 by  
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More consumers than ever are trying alternative proteins. But will they make them part of their diets?

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Americans, especially millennials and Gen Z, are embracing plant-based meat products

Impossible Burger is now available in grocery stores

September 23, 2019 by  
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Previously found only at high-end restaurants and fast-food chains, the famous plant-based Impossible Burger now lines grocery store shelves in Southern California. Not from the West Coast? Don’t worry. Impossible Foods will, in the next few weeks, announce when their cutting-edge meatless burger shall debut in East Coast grocery stores. By mid-2020, the Impossible Burger is expected to be available in every region nationwide. Related: Beyond & Impossible alternative meats: are they actually healthier than the real thing? The success of the retail rollout is thanks to two reasons. For one, Impossible Foods has partnered with food provider OSI Group to expand operations. But, more importantly, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finally approved the company’s “secret ingredient.” According to Impossible Foods CEO, Dr. Patrick Brown, the secret to Impossible products centers around the heme protein, which is naturally found in soybean roots . This key ingredient mimics meat’s texture, even “bleeding” to simulate beef. Because the burger is plant-based, it does not taste exactly like a beef patty. Yet, it is a different type of delicious flavor, accented further with a crunchy coating. Also, with only 20 grams of protein per serving, it is a healthier choice. For now, Gelson’s Markets is the sole retail grocery chain selling the Impossible Burger with only 10 packages allowed per customer visit. Just earlier this year in May, while Impossible Foods raised $300 million in venture capital funding, its competitor, Beyond Meat , went public and has found stock valuation steadily increasing. Not to mention, when a single KFC franchise in Atlanta offered Beyond Meat’s meatless chicken on its menu a couple of months ago, it sold out almost immediately. Tyson and Smithfield are jumping in on the alternative meat trend. Similarly, Kellogg’s and Nestle are in the midst of research and development so that they, too, can partake of the meatless sector. Plus, Kroger is reportedly set to launch a line of meatless products later this year. Many environmentally -conscientious folks, determined to counteract global warming, are likewise singing the praises of alternative meat. Going meatless ultimately helps taper the methane-producing cattle population as well as scale back the amount of grazing land, which all translates into a smaller environmental footprint. Moreover, with no accompanying hormones nor antibiotics, the meatless burger patty is certain to delight health-minded enthusiasts everywhere. Via Gizmodo Image via

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Impossible Burger is now available in grocery stores

Why chicken producers Perdue and Tyson are going flexitarian

July 1, 2019 by  
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Blended meat won’t save the world, but it’s a huge step in the right direction.

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Why chicken producers Perdue and Tyson are going flexitarian

Tyson’s plant-based nuggets could disrupt and dominate the market

June 17, 2019 by  
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Major meat corporation Tyson Foods is planning to join the alternative meat industry with two new products launching this year. Nuggets and burgers made of pea protein will hit grocery stores in the summer and fall, and more products are in development. With billions of dollars in profits and more factories than any alternative meat competitor, Tyson could potentially disrupt and dominate the growing market. In response to rising concerns about the environmental and ethical impacts of the meat industry, more people are seeking alternative or plant-based protein sources. The so-called ‘ alternative meat ‘ industry is predicted to grow by 78 percent in the next four years, according to one report. By 2023, the industry is expected to be worth $2.5 billion in the U.S. and up to $23 billion globally. Companies like Impossible Foods have a number of products in stores and restaurants around the world. Related: Impossible Burgers are such a success, they might run out Despite dominating the animal-based meat industry and pushing to prohibit plant-based companies from using the term “meat,” Tyson executives saw a huge opportunity to invest in the growing industry. In 2016, Tyson owned 5 percent of Beyond Meat, and this year it is releasing its own products under brand name Raised and Rooted. Tyson’s alternative nuggets are made from peas, eggs, flaxseed, bamboo fiber and other plant-based ingredients. The company is also experimenting with sausages and meatballs that contain less meat products and mix in alternative proteins such as chickpeas and quinoa. “It became apparent we had the capability not only to compete but to lead in this space,” said Justin Whitmore, lead for Tyson’s alternative protein brand. Based on Tyson’s size and profits, many are fearful it will take over the industry. Nestle and Perdue also announced that they will be launching plant-based proteins in the near future, and they are in a position to be potential challengers to Tyson, given their large-scale operations and profit margins. + Raised and Rooted + Tyson Foods Via NBC Image via Shutterstock

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Tyson’s plant-based nuggets could disrupt and dominate the market

Katharina Unger’s Farm 432 Breeds Edible Bugs at Home

July 26, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Katharina Unger’s Farm 432 Breeds Edible Bugs at Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alternative protein , eco design , Farm 432 , green design , insect eating , Katharina unger , raising larvae , sustainable design        

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Katharina Unger’s Farm 432 Breeds Edible Bugs at Home

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